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Among the Isles of Shoals ePub download

by Celia Thaxter

  • Author: Celia Thaxter
  • ISBN: 1110824718
  • ISBN13: 978-1110824717
  • ePub: 1254 kb | FB2: 1231 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: United States
  • Publisher: BiblioLife (May 31, 2009)
  • Pages: 194
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 592
  • Format: lrf rtf mobi mbr
Among the Isles of Shoals ePub download

Celia Laighton Thaxter (June 29, 1835 – August 25, 1894) was an American writer of poetry and stories. For most of her life, she resided with her father on the Isles of Shoals at his Appledore Hotel.

Celia Laighton Thaxter (June 29, 1835 – August 25, 1894) was an American writer of poetry and stories. How she grew up to become a writer is detailed in her early autobiography (published by St. Nicholas), and her book entitled Among the Isles of Shoals.

An American writer of poetry and stories, Celia Laighton Thaxter, was one of the most popular authors of the late nineteenth century. She is best known today for her non-fiction books An Island Garde. n and Among the Isles of Shoals. Celia grew up in the nine small Isles of Shoals, ten miles off the coast of New Hampshire. In her essays, devoted native land, she gives vivid descriptions of the isles, allowing readers, who have never even been there, to imagine the views, landscapes, flora and fauna of the area. Besides, the stories are fascinating, haunting and humorous.

Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tp. I only did to make it last longer. Celia totally loved her garden. She wrote about the flowers she planted, the birds who came to visit, and her battle with slugs

Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tp. She wrote about the flowers she planted, the birds who came to visit, and her battle with slugs. How I pulled for her to defeat those slugs!

Among her best-known poems Celia Laighton Thaxter was an American writer of poetry and stories. Thaxter grew up in the Isles of Shoals, first on White Island, where her father, Thomas Laighton, was a lighthouse keeper, and then on Smuttynose and Appledore Islands.

Among her best-known poems Celia Laighton Thaxter was an American writer of poetry and stories. Among her best-known poems are The Burgomaster Gull, Landlocked, Milking, The Great White Owl, The Kingfisher, and especially The Sandpiper. Books by Celia Laighton Thaxter.

Book digitized by Google from the library of the University of Michigan and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb.

J. R. Osgood and company. ark:/13960/t9j38wf0w.

Стр. 25 - The first place I set my foot upon in New England, was the Isle of Shoulds, being islands in the sea, about two leagues from the main. Upon these islands, I neither could see one good timber tree, nor so much good ground as to make a garden. Встречается в книгах (25) с 1792 по 1994.

Celia Thaxter was already a popular poet when she began to publish the essays of Among the Isles of Shoals in the Atlantic Monthly in 1869; they were an immediate sensation. Charles Dickens called Thaxter’s essays admirable and Horace Greeley declared.

Celia Laighton Thaxter was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire on June 29th, 1835 and spent her childhood years on the Isles of Shoals, initially on White Island, where her father, Thomas Laighton, was a lighthouse keeper, and then the wonderfully named Smuttynose and Appledore Islands. At sixteen, she married Levi Thaxter, her father’s business partner, and moved to the mainland, residing first in Watertown, Massachusetts, at a property his father owned. In 1854, they moved to a house in Newburyport and later, in 1856, acquired their own home near the Charles River at Newtonville.

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.
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Originally written as a series of newspaper articles the text appears as one long narrative for some reason which is a bit disconcerting at first but once you get used to it you find endless treasures both elegant and hilarious. Thaxter grew up on Star Island and is known both as an artist and for her fabulous flower gardens. She lived most of her life on the Isles of Shoals, those jewel like islands that glitter on the horizon nine miles off the coast of New Hampshire. Some years back I took a ferry out to Star Island and then across to Appledore Island but have never been to the rest. There are nine of them altogether. Nine made into eight by a connecting breakwater or seven when the tide is low and land connects two more.

The islands are home to the Star Island Hotel which is now a convention center owned by the Unitarian/Universalism Church (whose earliest known cemetery is my backyard) but which was once a popular resort managed by Celia Laighton Thaxter's father.

Her book is wonderful. She opens by describing the islands, both their geography and their history and then goes on to cover every aspect of life there. She rails quite furiously at how modern technology is ruining life there and how the newly built homes of settlers are an eyesore and destroy the charm of the ancient cottages. Since she wrote this in 1873 it is quite amusing to imagine how she would she her beloved islands today. Her love of the islands is on every page.

She amuses the reader with descriptions of the people, many of whom have lived their all their lives never stepping foot on the mainland. She describes their peculiar speech patterns, the odd, rolling gate that many of the men have developed from spending most of their time aboard ships. The discusses their habit of giving one another nicknames and odd local colloquialisms, rails against the drunkenness that has blighted the islands, and praises the women who seem to keep busy when the men are drinking. "Blessed be the man who invented knitting," she writes, "It is the most charming and picturesque of quiet occupations, leaving the knitter free to read aloud or talk or think while steadily, surely beneath the flying fingers the comfortable stocking grows."

In discussing mating rituals she recounts the native custom when a young man is besotted by a young lady he hides behind a tree and chucks rocks at her as she passes. If she turns to look at him that means she is interested. She tells of violinists who think that possessing a violin is all that is needed to make music and thus squawk out the most ear-splitting noise and give it pretentious, high-faulting names. In one charming passage she rhapsodizes about the sight of fishermen "Saxon-bearded, broad-shouldered, deep-chested, and bronzed with shade on shade of ruddy brown" and goes on to say "the neutral blues and grays of the salt-water make perfect backgrounds for the pictures these men are continually showing one in their life aboard the boats. Nothing can be more satisfactory." Celia! You naughty girl!

But amid the ghost stories, stories of wrecked ships, lost treasures, and amazing rescues are her descriptions of nature and there she is at her very best. She writes of storms and squalls, seals and snowy owls, songbirds and butterflies, the brilliant colors of island vegetation, and the beauties of the islands through the months from bleakest winter to sparkling summer.

This is a beautiful book - one that I'll keep and read again when I need a break from the mainland and the 21st century. It is a lovely little vacation in another era among the Isles of Shoals.
Purestone
Well written. had to keep reminding myself this was written in the 1800's. Good overview of the islands and reflections of life in those times.
Llathidan
I've read a lot of poorly edited kindle books but this is one of the worst. Whoever converted this from a printed item to ebook mangled it. The formatting is crazy and it results in a book that's hard to follow.

The book itself is an interesting series of articles that are at times interesting. At other times it bores you to tears but I think some of that is a result not knowing where one article begins and another ends.

I'd like to see a cleaned up version of this book. I think it would be a much more enjoyable read.
Thorgahuginn
This book was another visit to a previous century, and I loved reading it. Very poetic and also interesting to read someone's observations of their world, and compare it to how we live today!
Cashoutmaster
Loved it!!
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