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The Rough Guide to Iceland 3 (Rough Guide Travel Guides) ePub download

by James Proctor,Rough Guides,David Leffman

  • Author: James Proctor,Rough Guides,David Leffman
  • ISBN: 1843537672
  • ISBN13: 978-1843537670
  • ePub: 1859 kb | FB2: 1645 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Europe
  • Publisher: Rough Guides; 3rd edition (April 16, 2007)
  • Pages: 368
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 424
  • Format: azw mobi txt lrf
The Rough Guide to Iceland 3 (Rough Guide Travel Guides) ePub download

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Pocket Rough Guide Reykjavik Rough Guide to Canada. Get your dream travel planned & booked by local travel experts. About Rough Guides: Rough Guides have been inspiring travellers for over 35 years, with over 30 million copies sold. Synonymous with practical travel tips, quality writing and a trustworthy ‘tell it like it is’ ethos, the Rough Guides’ list includes more than 260 travel guides to 120+ destinations, gift-books and phrasebooks. Book Your Trip To Iceland. At Rough Guides, we understand that experienced travellers want to get truly.

James Proctor has been with Rough Guides since 1995, and is. .Rough Guides used to be good

James Proctor has been with Rough Guides since 1995, and is the company's original Nanook of the North. Rough Guides used to be good. This Iceland book is nothing more than a glorified 200-something page travel brochure, full of mediocre photos and the same kind of info you can get for free on the web or in official tourist brochures. A total waste of money.

James Proctor has been with Rough Guides since 1995, and is the company's original Nanook of the North. One of his more obscure talents is speaking fluent Swedish-something that never fails to impress and bemuse Swedes (and most other people) he meets. Having lived and worked in Stockholm during the mid-1990s as the BBC's Scandinavia correspondent, James now returns to Sweden at frequent intervals to commune with nature at his log cabin.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. The Rough Guide to Thailand's Beaches & Islands 3 (Rough Guide Travel Guides). Paul Gray, Lucy Ridout, Rough Guides. Категория: География, Краеведение, Туризм.

Rough Guide to Iceland book. The Rough Guide to Iceland 2 (Rough Guide Travel Guides). 1858285976 (ISBN13: 9781858285979). This guide to Iceland gives information on hotels, farmstays, hostels and camping, providing coverage of sites and stories of Viking sagas. There is advice on swimming in hot springs, climbing volcanoes, and tackling the icefields of Europe's largest glacier. It also details nightlife in Reykjavik.

We’ve brought you the guide book to Iceland, and now we can take you there with Rough Guides Trips! We offer stimulating cultural journeys packed with personality and adventure with local, on-the-ground experts. Rough Guides Roadtrip: Selma, Alabama. 18K views · 9 October.

by David Leffman, James Proctor. Books related to The Rough Guide to Iceland. The Rough Guide to Fiji (Travel Guide eBook). The guide also looks at Iceland's rich Viking history and its extraordinary geology and wildlife. The Rough Guide to Iceland (Travel Guide eBook). 12,02 €. The Rough Guide to Thailand's Beaches and Islands (Travel Guide eBook). 11,40 €. Bangkok (Thailand) Travel Guide - Tiki Travel.

Now is the time to explore Iceland - tourism is booming and your kroona will go further than you think

Now is the time to explore Iceland - tourism is booming and your kroona will go further than you think. Come eye to eye with the giants of the deep on a whale watching tour, take a dip in the geothermal waters of the Blue Lagoon, or hike to the isolated highland valley of THorsmoerk.

The Rough Guide to Istanbul is the ultimate travel guide with clear maps and detailed covera. The Rough Guide to Portugal is your ultimate handbook to one of Europe''s most beautiful countries. The Rough Guide to Portugal 12 (Rough Guide Travel Guides). 34 MB·480 Downloads·New! The Rough Guide to Portugal is your ultimate handbook to one of Europe''s most beautiful countries. The Rough Guide to Hindi & Urdu Dictionary Phrasebook 3. 242 Pages·2010·8. 4 MB·6,038 Downloads The Rough Guide to Swahili Dictionary Phrasebook 3 (Rough Guide Phrasebooks).

The Rough Guide to Iceland is your complete handbook to uncovering the delights of Europe’s largest glacier. From Reykjavik’s nightlife to the dramatic Western Fjords and table-top mountains to the rich birdlife of Lake Myvatn, the full-colour introduction highlights all the ‘things-not-to-miss’. For every town and village there are insider reviews of the all best places to stay, eat and drink, both on and off the beaten track, with the new ‘Author’s Pick’ feature highlighting the very best options. There is plenty of practical advice for a host of outdoor activities, from skiing on the Vatnajökull glacier to whale-watching and viewing the Northern Lights. The guide also looks at Iceland''s rich Viking history and its extraordinary geology and wildlife.

The Rough Guide to Iceland is like having a local friend plan your trip!

Mautaxe
This is a great map for planning your trip to Iceland. However, there are so many errors on it in terms of route numbers, campgrounds, etc., that I would avoid it when actually traveling there. One evening, my wife and I planned to stay at one of the marked campgrounds on the map, only to find it didn't exist. As we continued down the road, we thought we'd look at another marked campground. It also didn't exist. As a result, it was a *very* long day and we pulled into a campground far down the road and at 10 o'clock at night. It wasn't just campgrounds that were marked incorrectly, but the route numbers as well. As nice a map as it is, there are far too many errors on this to justify it as an in-country map. Use it to plan your overall trip, then pick up one of the regional tourist maps (free of charge at the info booth in Keflavik) or purchase a good road map/atlas for the actual driving.
Fegelv
Traveling in Iceland using this new edition of the Rough Guide gave me and my wife the impression that the author did not like Iceland. Simply put, there was ample evidence that most of what was written was obtained by an online search or word-of-mouth. There were a number of inaccuracies and omissions that would be unimaginable if the author had actually spent time in Iceland. In all likelihood, it was written from a three-day stay in Reykjavik during July (the height of tourist season). Here are some examples of the lazy writing that caused us MANY headaches:

-It is assumed that everyone in Iceland (locals and tourists) has a cellphone. There are rarely any phones available in hotel rooms or B&B's, and many times the phone number listed for a B&B is the cellphone of the owner. This was not mentioned in the book.
-Some towns are simply not mentioned. While the towns in Iceland tend to be very small and would not rate a mention in most guidebooks, this is true of 90% of the towns. There are only 320,000 people in Iceland - their towns can all be listed. For example, try finding Suðureyri in the guidebook. Not there. The town is a fairly substantial fishing village near Ísafjörður.
-Puffins: it is no secret that Iceland is home to many nesting grounds for puffins. We traveled to Iceland in the second half of August expecting to find puffins. According to the guidebook, the puffins can be found from April to Mid-September. Good luck with that. Any local can tell you (and will, if you ask them) that the puffins all leave by Mid-August. After August 15, you can only expect a few isolated puffins anywhere around Iceland. You might get lucky and find a group stopped at a southerly stop for a while (we did), but don't count on it. Where we saw a flock of puffins (at Vestmannaeyjar), none had been spotted a week prior. Yet another example of lazy, inaccurate writing that could have been corrected by some cursory research.
-Opening hours: we found more than one attraction with incorrect hours listed. Don't trust any times that say open after 18:00.
-Laugavegur: Everything written about the laugavegur lists it as a four-day hike from Landmannalaugar to Þórsmörk, with no other options. The author clearly pulled all of his information about this trek from other sources and did not try it himself nor talk to someone who had. While it is a full four days from start to end, there are buses that can be hired that reach Álftavatn (and Emstrur), which cut the walk in half - something useful if you wish to go elsewhere. Taking a bus either in or out of Álftavatn also avoids all of the potentially treacherous river fordings. The hike from Landmannalaugar to Álftavatn is also, by far, the most scenic portion of the hike.
-Buses: The only bus routes mentioned in the book start and end in Reykjavik. While those routes certainly exist and are useful, there are many other routes that start and end elsewhere. Bus tickets start at ~$50 a ride/person. Knowing all of the possibilities will help with planning more interesting excursions into the interior of Iceland without losing days on a bus.
-Roads: the road conditions and experience of driving in Iceland is quite different from the U.K. (including Skye) or mainland Europe. Doable, but be ready for very rough terrain (even the "good" roads). Not mentioned in this book.

I leave these bits of advice as examples of why you should find a different guidebook and as helpful tips to those wishing to go to Iceland (which is GREAT!). Good luck!
Qumenalu
Rough Guides used to be good. This Iceland book is nothing more than a glorified 200-something page travel brochure, full of mediocre photos and the same kind of info you can get for free on the web or in official tourist brochures. A total waste of money. Go instead for Andrew Evans's Bradt guide to Iceland, which has the in-depth perspective and cultural information you need to make your trip truly memorable.
Qane
We took a 2-week vacation to Iceland in May 2010, and spent most of the time driving around in a rental car. This map was essential. We drove along the south coast from Reykjavik to Jokulsarlon Bay, then up to the Snaefellsness Peninsula. The map shows all towns and several farms as well, so it's easy to track your progress. It also has little icons for gas stations, camp sites, churches, and museums (note: outside of Reykjavik, gas stations are a good place to get food). The map labels major mountain peaks, glaciers and glacial tongues, lakes, and lava flows.
This map does not contain a close-up of any towns. For Reykjavik details, we used our guidebook. We also ended up buying a regional map of the Snaefellsness peninsula, though this map would have been adequate for our travels there.
The cover fell off after about a week and a half, but the paper itself is very durable, and can tolerate a lot of folding and re-folding. The cover is really not important.
Overall, I would recommend this map if you plan on doing a lot of driving outside of Reykjavik.
Perius
I don't know what these other reviewers were looking at. This map may be ok if all you do is drive around the ring road but it lacks any sort of detail once you get off the ring road. And if you are only going to use it for the ring road... why even have a map? it goes in a circle. Afraid of getting lost on the circle?

The scale is too small to be useful, there are no detail maps of towns or cities including Reykjavik which is crazy. And dozens of roads in my experience were simply not on this map. I drove the southwest, south and west portions of the country. It would be nice if they included some landmarks or attractions or features on the map too. They have a legend with icons for some geological features but what is actually marked is unclear and small.

There must be better maps than this. I found it virtually useless to be honest and wound up using maps I grabbed at visitor centers.
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