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Come Back to Afghanistan ePub download

by Said Hyder Akbar

  • Author: Said Hyder Akbar
  • ISBN: 0747583668
  • ISBN13: 978-0747583660
  • ePub: 1232 kb | FB2: 1504 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Asia
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC; UK ed. edition (July 3, 2006)
  • Pages: 432
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 179
  • Format: lrf txt rtf azw
Come Back to Afghanistan ePub download

Come Back to Afghanistan. This is a book that leaves dust in your hair and blows sand into your teeth. San Francisco Chronicle Raw, honest and unnerving, the book is a grim reminder of Afghanistan's ongoing political struggles

Come Back to Afghanistan. San Francisco Chronicle Raw, honest and unnerving, the book is a grim reminder of Afghanistan's ongoing political struggles. USA Today Said Hyder Akbar is currently a junior at Yale University in New Haven, CT.

Come Back to Afghanistan - Said Hyder Akbar. I told Matin I was coming back to California soon, in just a little more than a week. Matin said that they were planning a hiking trip to Tahoe for right around then and that I should come along. But I hoped I'd get back in time to go with them anyway.

Come Back to Afghanistan book. The intimate and riveting chronicle of an extraordinarily.

Come Back to Afghanistan:. has been added to your Cart. The book's title was intriguing and it did not disappoint! In fact, I kept turning to the back cover to check the photo of the teenager, Said Hyder Akbar, in amazement. I found his writing profound for a boy of seventeen

Come Back to Afghanistan:. I found his writing profound for a boy of seventeen. That he had the ability to record in such detail the events he experienced during summers as his father's trusted companion within the fledgling Hamid Karzai Government of Afghanistan was amazing.

Said Hyder Akbar is currently a junior at Yale University in New Haven, C.

Said Hyder Akbar is currently a junior at Yale University in New Haven, CT. He is also codirector and founder of his own nongovernmental organization, Wadan Afghanistan, which has rebuilt schools and constructed pipe systems in rural Kunar province.

Come Back to Afghanistan : Trying to Rebuild a Country with My Father, My Brother, My One-Eyed Uncle, Bearded . I just finished 'Come Back to Afghanistan: My Journey from California to Kabul' written by Said Hyder Akbar, a 20-year old college student in California.

Come Back to Afghanistan : Trying to Rebuild a Country with My Father, My Brother, My One-Eyed Uncle, Bearded Tribesmen, and PR. by Susan Burton and Said Hyder Akbar.

Said Hyder Akbar (born 1984 in Peshawar, Pakistan) is an American writer and an entrepreneur in Afghanistan. Akbar, a citizen of both Afghanistan and the United States, attended Diablo Valley College and transferred to Yale University

Said Hyder Akbar is a student at Yale and author of the 2005 memoir Come Back to Afghanistan: A California . His book about his time there, Come Back to Afghanistan: A California Teenager's Story, will be published in paperback by Bloomsbury in November

Said Hyder Akbar is a student at Yale and author of the 2005 memoir Come Back to Afghanistan: A California Teenager's Story. Oh, and his dad is good buddies with Hamid Karzai. Akbar talks about the state of Afghanistan in this exclusive G. om interview. His book about his time there, Come Back to Afghanistan: A California Teenager's Story, will be published in paperback by Bloomsbury in November. Here, Hyder speaks to Randy Hartwell for G. om. Why do you think you heard the "Come back to Afghanistan" call so loudly. I think that for a lot of people, when they left Afghanistan, it was for good.

Said Hyder Akbar's ordinary suburban Californian life was turned upside-down after September 11th. Hyder's father, a scion of an Afghan political family, left for Afghanistan to become the new president's chief spokesman and later the governor of Kunar, a rural province.

Come Back to Afghanistan" is the story of the country's reconstruction effort over the last three years, as told by Said Hyder Akbar, a teenager whose father, Said Fazel Akbar, is a prominent member of the new Afghan government. Fazel was close to several mujahedeen commanders during the Soviet war in the 1980's and ran Afghanistan's official radio station, Kabul Radio, which was an early target of the Soviet invasion.

Said Hyder Akbar's ordinary suburban Californian life was turned upside-down after September 11th. Hyder's father, a scion of an Afghan political family, left for Afghanistan to become the new president's chief spokesman and later the governor of Kunar, a rural province. Obsessed since childhood with a country he had never visited, seventeen-year-old Hyder convinced his father to let him join him. Working alongside his father at the presidential palace and in Kunar gave Hyder a unique perspective on the creation of democratic government in Afghanistan. In "Come Back to Afghanistan," Hyder interweaves his personal journey - that of a teenager struggling to find his identity in his parents' homeland - with his travels, which take him from palaces to prisons and from Kabul to the borderlands, to give a dramatic account of political and civilian life in post-Taliban Afghanistan.
Lailace
I was intrigued after hearing the author as a special correspondent on NPR's Morning Edition. His insightful recorded journal was riveting. To encourage my 79 year-old mother to keep mentally active, I often buy a second copy of a book for her to read simultaneously and then we discuss the book as we read it. She and I were both very impressed by the maturity and skill of this young author. We had both just finished reading the novel The Kite Runner which is set in Afghanistan. Said does a masterful job of viewing Afghanistan from both the perspective of an American and of a native son which makes the read both enjoyable and enlightening. My mother, who has very limited experience with other cultures and is very conservative, was quite moved by the dilemma of the people of Afghanistan. I think this is a must-read for anyone who wants to have a better global perspective than they are given by the evening news.
lolike
The book's title was intriguing and it did not disappoint!
In fact, I kept turning to the back cover to check the photo of the teenager, Said Hyder Akbar, in amazement. I found his writing profound for a boy of seventeen.

That he had the ability to record in such detail the events he experienced during summers as his father's trusted companion within the fledgling Hamid Karzai Government of Afghanistan was amazing.

While reading this book, I could easily put myself in his place, a young American who fit into two worlds well.
He was an insider with the US Army, and with his father's Pashtun People, trusted by both, believing the best about both.

This story shows life as it is in Kunar Province and Kabul, often disappointing, dangerous, full of infighting, distrust.

It is a wonderful way to learn about history from the perspective of one young American boy.
Its point of view is mostly postive about the Karzai Govt.,
Lost Python
I wish I would have read this book prior to going to Afghanistan my first time...on my sixth trip over, and this book is still very educating. Do not expect this book to make you feel better about your political views. However, it will give you a better understanding of the Pashtun culture as well as an insider's view into the tribes and civilization that makes up Afghanistan. After working with Pashtun's day in and day out this book definitely helped me to have a better understanding of where they are coming from. A must read for anyone that may work in Kunar, or any area around Kunar. Thanks Said for opening my eyes a little more, I will use this information for this, and any other trip to Afghanistan.
Akinohn
I've read so much of the Afghan war from the American perspective that this was such an eye opening read. He is one of the few people that can explain some critical differences in Afghan culture that cause unnecessary friction as the US tries to work to rebuild and stabilize the country. A must read.
Cildorais
Very good insight into afghan-American life after 2001. Also presents a very good perspective on the challenges for karzai once he assumed his leadership role. The author provides a view of us soldiers from an afghan perspective. A great book to read.
Gavinranara
I was there at same time and knew the author and he makes himself dramatically self important. His father did try to make things better, but he was discounted by the local people because he had lived the last several decades in the U.S. and had past ties with the U.S. government. Want to read a book that captures the culture of the people in Afghanistan through the reign of the Taliban? Then buy the Book Seller of Kabul.
Vudozilkree
Hyder is a most exceptional teenager. He speaks English, Dari and Pashtu, and spends his summer vacations helping his father rebuild Afganistan. That he will meet his college language requirement by studying French... as though the world is crying for French translators... is only one anomaly of his eventful young life.

Hyder describes the dangerous, grinding work of rebuilding Afganistan. I hope Young (and Senior)Akbar can keep enthusiasm because their country needs them and they are in a unique position to serve.

I believe there is more consensus in the US for Afgan assistance than almost any issue out there, but Hyder doesn't encounter much reconstruction. Everytime we see the US, it's a military presence, and the encounters are less than desireable.

Failures on the micro level - Soldiers give a village a pipe so that they can build a water supply - Karsai's US bodyguards contradict him in front of others - Hyder's dad, governor of a province, close personal friend of Karsai, father of American citizens, has to be searched to enter a US military base.

On the macro level is the fate of Abdul Wali. It's unclear why he's presumed to have information or to be guilty of something. But, Adbul Wali, father of 15 children, (29 years old?) can't tell us why or how he died in US custody, setting back credibility for the US and Karsai. We meet people who lose loved ones in what is commonly called "collateral damage" or "friendly fire".

We drive with Hyder through roadless places and climb surreptitiously into Pakistan. He recounts the nuances of the first post Taliban Loya Jirga (missling the big point the female reps). We get insight into how a tiny country manages an international media, the appointment processes, how UN workers will accept triage in its voting registration process if local officials let them, the legacy of the comminist era, warlords and notables.

We learn how opportunitsts like Malik Zarin play the US troops like a fiddle... just call your enemies Taliban!

Afganistan only makes headlines when there is an explosion. Where is our tax money going? What do we have to show for the post-Taliban dollars and human lives that have been spent? HOW do we support Karsai, his cabinet and his governors? In this book, the only Americans are in the military or with the press. WHAT are they doing over there?

This book should be required reading for any soldier or official in Afganistan or Iraq and be highly recommended for anyone even thinking about nation building anywhere in the world.
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