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Travels in Arabia Deserta, Vol. 1 ePub download

by T. E. Lawrence,Charles Montagu Doughty

  • Author: T. E. Lawrence,Charles Montagu Doughty
  • ISBN: 0486238253
  • ISBN13: 978-0486238258
  • ePub: 1588 kb | FB2: 1418 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Asia
  • Publisher: Dover Pubns (January 1, 1980)
  • Pages: 674
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 910
  • Format: lit azw doc lrf
Travels in Arabia Deserta, Vol. 1 ePub download

Travels in Arabia Deserta, originally published in 1888, is a two-volume . In the 1920's, it was discovered by British Army Officer . Lawrence, who spurred the book's republication, this time with an introduction from Lawrence

Travels in Arabia Deserta, originally published in 1888, is a two-volume set which describes English poet Charles Doughty's extensive travels through the Arabian deserts and the discoveries he made there. The work became well-regarded for its beautiful prose as well as its extensiveness, which made it a benchmark of ambitious travel writing in the early 20th century. Lawrence, who spurred the book's republication, this time with an introduction from Lawrence.

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Travels in Arabia Deserta, originally published in 1888, is a two-volume set which describes English poet Charles Doughty's extensive travels through the Arabian . has been added to your Cart.

Travels in Arabia Deserta, originally published in 1888, is a two-volume set which describes English poet Charles Doughty's extensive travels through the Arabian deserts and the discoveries he made there. The work became well-regarded for its beautiful prose as well as its extensiveness.

Travels in Arabia Deserta. For some reason there is no indication on the title page or the electronic record.

He is best known for his 1888 travel book Travels in Arabia Deserta, a work in two volumes that . T. E. Lawrence rediscovered the book and caused it to be republished in the 1920s, contributing an admiring introduction of his own.

T. Since then, the book has gone in and out of print. The book is a vast recounting of Doughty's treks through the Arabian deserts, and his discoveries there.

Start by marking Travels in Arabia Deserta, Volume 1 as Want to Read .

Start by marking Travels in Arabia Deserta, Volume 1 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Charles Doughty () spent two years among various nomad tribes and wrote in 1888 what would be the first Western exploration of the Arabian Desert began in the mid-eighteenth century, but it was not until the nineteenth century that the British officers of the Indian colonial government undertook surveys of the areas remote from the major pilgrimage routes.

Travels in Arabia Deserta, originally published in 1888, is a two-volume .

Download books for free. Travels in Arabia Deserta. Charles Montagu Doughty. Download (epub, . 9 Mb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Travels in Arabia Deserta Volume II by Charles Doughty and a great selection of related books, art and .

Two amazon reviews: An excellent, though challenging read, May 27, 1999 By A Customer Doughty wrote in a relatively laboured, archaic style which demands patience from the reader. Initially on that account it was hard going for me (and I would image, for most people), but the book, wherein he presents an account of his solitary travels and tribulations during a period of nearly two years between 1876 and 1878, has long been widely regarded as a classic. It rewards persistence, and I found it quite spell-binding. Doughty was not without an ironic sense of humour as you can see from what he wrote about an Arab he encountered; "...his strength lay in his stubborn brawns and large breast, and little in his brains which indeed were not very well settled." And something of his style as he wrote about pilgrams he fell in with on the way to Mecca: "... peasants for the most part, as the richer and delicate livers are ever less zealous to seek hallows than poor bodies with small consolation in this world." Fantastic freaky style of Charles Doughty, May 29, 1998 By A Customer Convinced in the late 1800s that the English language had become hopelessly corrupt, Charles Doughty attempted in Arabia Deserta (and, less successfully, in his epic poems) to graft Victorian English onto Elizabethan syntax. The result was a beautiful, sometimes obscure, entirely original style that had a great deal of influence on the English modernists, particularly Henry Green. I recommend it to anyone with a modicum of patience and taste.
Xwnaydan
A new edition of this perhaps the most beautifully written book in English is long overdue. Recommend reading a bio of CM Doughty, "God's Fugitive", and Henry Green's essay on CM Doughty and Arabia Deserta. Worth the expense. Henry Green wrote that this is not a book to be read straight through, but in and out from time to time as you are moved to go to it. The prose is complicated and reflects the author's admiration for Edmund Spenser. If you like Spenser, this book is for you. Heck, if you like "Moby Dick", Boswell's biograph of Dr. Johnson, or even The Great Cham of Literature himself, this book is for you. I first came to it from reading Robert Graves' autbio, "Goodbye to All That", and Penguin years ago published "Passages from Arabia Deserta", but that was just enough to begin an acquaintence. You can zip through a short story in a magazine over two shots of espresso while sitting in Starbucks, and that's fine, but I don't find that challenging or even fun, nor do I learn anything much. Might as well read the Sporting News. I might get twenty minutes of entertainment value reading "clean prose". I don't improve my rhetoric skills by reading something that simple. Doughty will "kick you in the pants", but once you start to get his signal, you'll be delighted, I'm sure.
The Apotheoses of Lacspor
I had read about this renown book in the "By The Book" piece in the NYT when an author mentioned how much she liked it and returned to it over and over. This edition is beautiful with its print and illustrations. I intend to read parts at a time for the history and color of the region in the 19th C.
Cenneel
After reading this work detailing the 1870s [mis]adventures of the legendary Charles M. Doughty, one comes to understand much better why T.E.Lawrence so admired the Bedu and mistrusted the Arab city dweller. Doughty's "travels" really amounted to being "driven" through hostile lands occupied by "fanatics," continuously handed off from one group of outlaws and thieves to another. "I found in them an implacable fanaticism," wrote Doughty. "All their life is passed in fraud and deceipt." Sacred oaths, swearing in the name of God out of mere habit, traditional mores of protecting the fellow-traveller in one's charge honored mostly in the breach. One friendly Arab acquaintance along the tortured path tells Doughty, "I hope that your life may be preserved: but they will not suffer you to dwell amongst them! You will be driven from place to place. As many among them as have travelled, are liberal; but the rest, no." Abdullah el-Kenneyny advised Doughty, "I am even now in amazement! that in such a country, you openly avow yourself to be an Englishman; but how may you pass even one day in safety. You have lived hitherto with the Bedu; but it is otherwise in the townships."

Early on, the strange language seemed humorous and distracting, but it soon grows on you. "Give me a hand" becomes "Lend me a grip of thy five." Robbed, stripped, insulted, the intrepid Doughty gives the evil-doers the back of his hand as often as he dared, many times with his hand on a revolver hidden under his robes. One bluff carried off successfully against fellow travellers, who were sworn, of course, to defend him -- "By the life of Him who created us, in what instant you show me a gun's mouth, I will lay dead your carcasses upon this earth."

Occasionally some paragraph seems to be the obvious inspiration for a like passage in Lawrence's "Seven Pillars of Wisdom," an exquisitely detailed description of how a camel comes to a halt and lies down being one of the most obvious examples.

A major feature of this work is the great care taken by the author to use and then explain the Arabic vocabulary for places and things unique to the Arab culture. Each and every page is peppered with these terms. There is a fine glossary, praise God, the Merciful One!

The first half of this collection of selected passages from the massive original work will give readers warm feelings for the Bedouin and sweet dreams of wandering amongst them at peace with God and nature. The second half will likely wipe out any such urge. Civilizations still clash, 130 years later. Extremists rear their ugly heads on both sides of a vast chasm. Will the next 130 years bring much fundamental change?
Zulkishicage
Dodgy digital transcription compounded by at times impenetrable style of expression - accordingly marked down from 7 stars.
Not everyone's cuppa, I'm sure.
Riavay
Very badly formatted for the kindle.
Mikale
A Genie in the House of Saud: Zubis Rises (A Genie in the House of Saud)

A bit arachaic in language and cultural approach, but the narrative pictures Doughty draws are fascinating; submersion into a little known cultural and time. Great for anthropological studies.
Peles
This is a book I need for research. It's a ponderous 19th century treatise on travel and archeology. I have little else to write.
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