» » Aunt Maria

Aunt Maria ePub download

by Diana Wynne Jones

  • Author: Diana Wynne Jones
  • ISBN: 0064473589
  • ISBN13: 978-0064473583
  • ePub: 1507 kb | FB2: 1963 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Science Fiction & Fantasy
  • Publisher: Greenwillow Books (September 1, 2003)
  • Pages: 288
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 411
  • Format: azw mbr doc docx
Aunt Maria ePub download

Illustrated by Paul Hess. This book is for Elly. We have had Aunt Maria ever since Dad died. If that sounds as if we have the plague, that is what I mean.

Illustrated by Paul Hess. Chris says it is more like that card game, where the one who wins the Queen of Spades loses the game.

Diana Wynne Jones (16 August 1934 – 26 March 2011) was a British writer of fantasy novels for children and adults. She wrote a small amount of non-fiction

Diana Wynne Jones (16 August 1934 – 26 March 2011) was a British writer of fantasy novels for children and adults. She wrote a small amount of non-fiction. This list follows the Internet Speculative Fiction Database in grouping many works in five fiction series. Some other classifications differ from ISFDB. There is some overlap in listings. Changeover (1970) - reissued 2004, London: Moondust Books, with a new introduction by Jones, "The Origins of Changeover".

Diana Wynne Jones once again has created a fantastic, magical world. Her brilliant storytelling and wonderful sense of humor totally involve the reader in the lives of a lovable young heroine and a villainess readers will love to hate.

It seems centuries since I wrote the last bit. It is only three days. It’s going to take ages to write down. Saturday was the day of the hunt. All the time we were getting Aunt Maria dressed. she was saying, over and over, Now, Betty, you’re to stay here with me, dear. I always do, don’t I?. Mum said, a bit sourly. What about the kids?. I’ll let little Naomi go with Elaine and Larry, if she promises to be very good and careful, Aunt Maria said. Nobody mentioned Chris, I noticed.

In Cranbury-on-Sea Aunt Maria rules with a rod of sweetness far tougher than iron and deadlier than poison. In Cranbury-on-Sea Aunt Maria rules with a rod of sweetness far tougher than iron and deadlier than poison. Strange and awful things keep happening in Cranbury. Why are all the men apparently gray-suited zombies? Why do all the children-if you ever see them-behave like clones? And what has happened to Mig's brother, Chris? Could gentle, civilized Aunt Maria, with her talk and daily tea parties, possibly have anything to do with it?

Diana Wynne Jones once again has created a fantastic, magical world. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus Читать весь отзыв.

Diana Wynne Jones (16 August 1934 – 26 March 2011) was a British author who wrote the book Howl's Moving Castle. Studio Ghibli later adapted the book into an animated film. Diana was born in London, the daughter of Marjorie (née Jackson) and Richard Aneurin Jones, both of whom were teachers. When war was announced, shortly after her fifth birthday, she was evacuated to Wales, and thereafter moved several times, including periods in Coniston Water, in York, and back in London.

Diana Wynne Jones first conjured up the enigmatic and embroidered dressing-gowned enchanter Chrestomanci in 1977. The adventures in his magical worlds - for, as every budding sorcerer knows - there are many series of parallel worlds - continue to enthral readers all over the world. Charmed Life, the first book in the Chrestomanci series, won the 1977 Guardian Award for Children's Books. Diana was runner-up for the Children's Book Award in 1981, and was twice runner-up for the Carnegie Medal. Why are all the men apparently gray-suited zombies? Why do all the children - if you ever see them - behave like clones? And what has happened to Mig's brother, Chris? Could gentle, civilized Aunt Maria, with her talk and daily tea parties, possibly have anything to do with it? Diana Wynne Jones once again has created a fantastic, magical world.

While visiting and caring for Great-Aunt Maria in Cranbury-on-Sea, Mig and Chris discover that their "helpless" relative has frightening powers. Simultaneous.
Berenn
I don't know why reviewers persist in synopsizing the story for you - do they think they are retelling it? (Doesn't it bother you to have your own experience spoiled a bit by that?) Do they think the author didn't do a good enough job, that someone wants the Cliff's Notes' version?
Do they think (do you think) that a good story is just plot?
Well, fans of this great writer, Diana Wynne Jones, know she puts enough twists in each of her plots to fill a dozen lesser writers' books. What Jones always brings are qualities of character and inventive storytelling. (Her epic Dalemark Quartet leaves me spellstruck, still, decades later.) And you get that here, in spades. She deals with themes most other writers would treat as horror, melodrama.
Readers of her books know they will subtly learn something about the way the world works - call it psychology, philosophy, or call it magic. In "Aunt Maria," we explore broken families and how it goes over kids heads (& straight to the heart). It looks at the subjective differences between men & women, and how exploitation of both is surely taught. And, mostly, how we learn manipulation... and how that can be dealt with. Heavy things for "simple fantasy," eh?
That's Jones, for you. She always, ALWAYS gives more than you expect, more than she has to in a story. She works harder than anyone I know to put so much so carefully into a story. It's like reading a prismatically colorful Persian rug or Medieval tapestry, getting caught up in the workings of the threads. Watching the world unravel around you and then be woven whole again. You're in new cloth when you come to.
Read Diana Wynne Jones to learn what REAL magic is all about. Amazingly, one finishes a book of hers with ones' own magic increased. You might shrug it off as just the sense of wonder, the imagination. No matter, it's still powerful stuff to be passing on to us. Thanks, Diana.
Jogas
Although the book is written for young readers, I'm an adult and I loved it. I'm a big fan of Diana Wynne Jones, This story starts out as a girl's tale of a seemingly never-ending visit, with her mother and brother, to stay with the horribly passive aggressive and controlling Aunt Maria after the loss of her father, but gradually blends in fantasy elements including magic and time travel. Told with much humor throughout. Romps to a very satisfying conclusion without being a saccharine happy ending. I highly recommend it for all ages.
Knights from Bernin
war of the sexes . . . . with magic!
Balhala
I love nearly everything Diana Wynne Jones has written. Her wit, insight, and clever plots make each story a delight. Aunt Maria is no exception. I'll probably be re-reading it once a year forever!
Gavigamand
Diana Wynne Jones writes many fun novels that are easy to travel to. Good triumphs over evil through group effort.
Ucantia
predictable, needlessly dark, no magic system worth speaking of... and it's hard to get through if you can't relate to any one character deeply. just avoid this one if you love the chrestomanci series or howls.moving castle
Mananara
good story
Diana Wynne Jones once again combines eccentric characters, moral ambiguity, magic, time travelling, shapeshifting and an uncanny ability to portray human behaviour in one of her best books: "Aunt Maria". With all the twists and turns that we expect from Wynne Jones, "Aunt Maria" is one of the most re-readable and enjoyable books in her vast collection.

After the accidental death of their father, Naomi "Mig" and Chris Laker are reluctantly taken to Cranbury-on-Sea by their mother to visit Aunt Maria. Maria appears to be a cuddly old lady (though is constantly ringing up and meddling in their lives), but once they get to their house the siblings find that she is much worse. Behind her compliments and manners is an old lady determined to get her own way - for instance, when she says "I won't bother with breakfast, now Lavinia's not here to bring it to me in bed," she means: "I demand breakfast in bed."

Cranbury itself is just as bad: the women flock around Maria in daily tea-parties like she's their Queen-bee, whilst the men work like zombies and the clone-like children spend their days in an orphanage. Enigmas pile up on all sides: who is the ghost haunting Chris's room? What happened to the previous maid Lavinia? Why does Maria despise the elderly Phelp neighbours? What is contained within the beautiful green box Mig finds? And could it be possible that the children's father actually reached Cranbury on the day he supposedly died?

All the answers to these mysteries are brought together beautifully as the book progresses - but not before Mig must deal with the battle of the sexes in the town, the fact that her brother has been turned into a wolf, the mind-manipulation being dealt upon her mother, and Maria's own sinister designs for her! For such a slim volume it is jam-packed full of interesting ideas, plot revelations and clever ideas.

Diana Wynne Jones usually prefers males as her protagonists, but after reading Mig I hope that in the future she creates more female ones, as she's one of the funniest, sympathetic, self-aware and utterly helpless heroines I've ever read - and despite her complete lack of doing hardly anything proactive or helpful throughout the book, she's an utter delight. Also on hand is her brother Chris who is far more outspoken than she, and doesn't hesitate to insult anyone he pleases. Throughout the story the bond between the siblings is strong, realistic and immensely touching - as when the transformed Chris seeks out comfort from his sister.

Mrs Laker is also nicely created, as is the sinister Elaine, but of course the centrepiece of the story is Maria herself. Self-righteous, self-pitying, hypocritical, intensely annoying, and yet a pleasure to read about, this is one character that's impossible to describe: you'll have to read in order to really appreciate what Wynne Jones has created. The family's way of handling Maria is the author at her hilarious best, and the closest another author has come to capturing the sheer loathsomeness of Maria is J.K. Rowling (who by the way, has almost certainly read this book) and her own villainess Dolorous Umbridge.

As well as this is the intricate and well-paced plot, which includes a huge number of characters, events, magical implements and ideas. The time-travel sequence in particular is marvellously created, and I'm certain it was the inspiration for Harry Potter's similar experience in "The Prisoner of Azkaban." Most wonderful of all is her ability to take human relationships and explore them in depth - in this case it is the way some use guilt and the rules of manners in order to get their way.

I would say that "Aunt Maria" is my favourite Diana Wynne Jones book out there, but so many great titles are out there that I wouldn't want to limit myself to just one. In any case "Aunt Maria" an immensely enjoyable book - and if there are any film-makers out there, it would also make a brilliant movie: hint, hint.
E-Books Related to Aunt Maria: