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Order of the Poison Oak, The ePub download

by Brent Hartinger

  • Author: Brent Hartinger
  • ISBN: 0060567317
  • ISBN13: 978-0060567316
  • ePub: 1892 kb | FB2: 1365 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Literature & Fiction
  • Publisher: HarperTeen (March 15, 2005)
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 655
  • Format: azw doc rtf lrf
Order of the Poison Oak, The ePub download

Why did I feel like the hallway of my high school was some perilous corridor of fire, and the looks in the eyes of the other students were the flames of that blazing inferno? There is a very short answer to that question: earlier in the year, some friends and I had started the Goodkind High Gay-Straight Bisexual Alliance.

Feb 24, 2014 Roger Hyttinen rated it it was amazing. Last week, I posted about The Geography Club book and movieby Brent Hartinger, and about how much I loved it. Imagine my delight when I discovered that there are now a series of books featuring Russel. Though this book is geared towards Young Adults, I feel that this is a book that anyone can enjoy, regardless of age.

Hartinger makes some good points, comparing children with scars on the outside to those with scars on the inside, and does it in a way that's never cloying or hokey

Told through the perspective of Russel, we learn that he is the brunt of anti-gay slurs, gets his locker defaced on a regular basis and receives anonymous bullying e-mails. Hartinger makes some good points, comparing children with scars on the outside to those with scars on the inside, and does it in a way that's never cloying or hokey. And the romantic yearning felt by the three central characters are universal; some might characterize the book as a being for "gay teens," but I think these emotions can be empathized by anyone with heart.

Book 2 in the Russel Middlebrook Series that started with Geography Club. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

he book is beautifully written, authentic-sounding and smart.

Camp counselors, Camps, Burns and scalds, Homosexuality, Camp counselors, Camps, Burns and scalds, Homosexuality. New York : HarperTempest. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Andy Wilcoxon on October 22, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Hartinger is the author of fourteen novels. Geography Club (2003). His first published book was the young adult novel Geography Club (HarperCollins, 2003). He subsequently published seven companion books to that novel, including The Thing I Didn’t Know I Didn’t Know (2014); Barefoot in the City of Broken Dreams (2015); The Road to Amazing (2016); and The Otto Digmore Difference (2017). These last four books were written for adults, and include the teen characters from his earlier YA novels, but now adults in their twenties.

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A weekend retreat in the woods and an innocent game of three truths and a lie go horribly wrong in this high-octane psychological thriller filled with romantic suspense by a Lambda Award–winning author

A weekend retreat in the woods and an innocent game of three truths and a lie go horribly wrong in this high-octane psychological thriller filled with romantic suspense by a Lambda Award–winning author. Deep in the forest, four friends gather for a weekend of fun. Truth Rob is thrilled about the weekend trip. to be the person he really, really wants to be. Truth Liam, Rob's boyfriend, is nothing short of perfect. He's everything Rob could have wanted.

Summer camp is different from high school. Something about spending the night.

Things happen.

Geography Club's Russel Middlebrook is back, and he and his friends are off to work as counselors at a summer camp. Brent Hartinger's third novel is the story of Indian legends, skinny-dipping in moonlit coves, and passionate summer romance. It's also the story of Russel's latest club, the Order of the Poison Oak, a secret society dedicated to helping its members see life's hidden beauty and accept its sometimes painful sting.

Styphe
--The Russel Middlebrook Series Continues--

Awhile ago, I read The Geography Club by Brent Hartinger and absolutely loved it. Imagine my delight when I discovered that there are now a series of books featuring Russel. So I snatched up the second one in the series: The Order of the Poison Oak and read it in one sitting. Though this book is geared towards Young Adults, I feel that this is a book that anyone can enjoy, regardless of age. As with The Geography Club, I found it an excellent read.

--School’s Tough--

(Geography Club spoilers below)

At the end of the last book, Russel, who just joined the Gay/Straight Alliance group at school, is outed to the entire school. In the beginning of The Order of the Poison Oak, things are not easy for our hero at Robert L. Goodkind High. Told through the perspective of Russel, we learn that he is the brunt of anti-gay slurs, gets his locker defaced on a regular basis and receives anonymous bullying e-mails. In regards to the old “Sticks and Stones adage, he writes:

”..did it ever occur to whoever wrote that stupid adage that hurtful words might be a pretty good indication that stick and stones are on
the way?”

When his friend Gunnar asks Russel if he’d be interested in being a counselor at summer camp with him and their friend Min, Russel jumps at the chance. The idea of being somewhere where nobody knows about him sounds pretty good to him. So off they go….

--Off to Summer Camp--

Russel, Min and Gunnar arrive at Camp Serenity where they’ll be spending the rest of the summer. During an orientation meeting, Russel notices fellow counselor and strikingly handsome Web, who, as Russel describes him, “was much prettier than any postcard.” When the camp director pairs up counselors who will be working together, Russel plans on working it so he’ll be paired up with hunky Web but to his surprise and dismay, his friend Min cuts him off and pairs herself with Web. Later on, an argument ensues as to whether Web is gay or straight? Russel takes this as a challenge. So who gets him? Ah, but you’ll have to read the book to find out.

--Monsters and Hellions and Brats, Oh My--

The counselor gig turns out to be much more challenging that Russel had originally thought. The first group of kids who will spend two weeks at camp are disfigured burn survivors and the counselors are given two days of Burn Survivor Sensitivity Training to prepare them. But nothing could prepare Russel for the cabin full of 10-year-old monsters for whom he is to be responsible for the next couple of weeks. They refuse to listen to him and defy him at every opportunity.

To make matters worse, it appears it is only Russel who has unruly kids – everyone else seems to be fairly well-behaved. Russel finally gains control and the respect of his kids, only to lose it later on through a careless inaction on his part. But he does end up redeeming himself later on through a delightful story he tells the kids and the “secret order” that develops from that story. This was an especially touching and heartfelt section of the book which made me like Russel all the more.

--Love on the Rocks…--

Russel develops a relationship with someone at camp, only to realize later that it is someone else that he had fallen in love with – he just doesn’t see it at first. Min’s relationship falls apart as well because of Russel’s actions and for a good portion of the book, the two are not on speaking terms. And Gunnar? Well, he decides that he is not going to date anyone at all and declares that he has completely given up on girls. A couple of embarrassing yet comical mishaps (ie. Gunnar tripping on a fish in front of the girl who likes him) entrenches his decision even further. Funny that…it seems that love tends to find us especially when we try with all our might to push it away. At one point, things look pretty bleak for Russel, Min and Gunnar. But eventually, it all comes together (well, for most of them).

--Learning and Growing--

This is one of those books where the reader feels as though he or she is on an emotional roller-coaster – at times I was laughing, at times I teared up; at other times I cringed, while a few times I was angry – all of which indicates a story well told. While Russel certainly does his fair share of screwing up, he also learns and grows throughout the story and is a much different person at the end than he was on Page 1. Through his mistakes, he learns the importance of doing the “right thing” and ends up discovering that we are all special and unique, no matter what our outward appearance or how hard we think we have conformed.

I found the characters to be well-developed and for me, they really came to life throughout this book. For me personally, this story brought back fond memories of the many summers that I spent as a 4-H camp counselor. The Order of the Poison Oak contains all of the things that makes a story great: adventure, struggle, friendship, redemption and yes, even romance – and is an exquisite addition to the YA/LGBT genre. I look forward to reading the next book in the series. Recommended!!
Lestony
I'm not going to describe the plot - that was done by others. I'm going to tell you what I liked and what I didn't like.
I liked the setting and the story line. I liked the characters. I liked the compassion Russel has for his group of campers. I liked Russels'
thoughts and ideas. I loved the story about the order of the poison oak.

What I didn't like were his one word responses when anyone tried to talk to him. "Huh?" and "What?" were two words I got tired of reading. Yes, he was usually deep into his own thoughts but it was still annoying. I kept thinking that at some point his friends would learn to tap him on the shoulder to let him know they were there and a conversation would ensue.

This is a quick read, about 4 hours for me. I read .three of this series out of order but am now reading them so there's some continuity.
Malaris
I initially felt disappointed with this book, because its first chapter starts off very slowly, almost leading me to put it down. Thankfully, I stuck with it, and was pleasantly surprised to see that POISON OAK actually surpasses the author's first book, GEOGRAPHY CLUB, to which this is a sequel.

One might think that the story of three teenage friends at a summer camp might not have a lot of dramatic potential... but think again. Sure, this story's got all the expected teenage angst, but add to that romance, betrayal, lust, friendship, and a wealth of other emotions -- quite a rollercoaster ride. Some unexpected twists and turns lead to several surprising dramatic climaxes, along with valuable lessons in life for both the reader and the characters.

Like the author's last novel, POISON OAK draws its characters vividly, and their many flaws make them both interesting and very real. Hartinger makes some good points, comparing children with scars on the outside to those with scars on the inside, and does it in a way that's never cloying or hokey. And the romantic yearning felt by the three central characters are universal; some might characterize the book as a being for "gay teens," but I think these emotions can be empathized by anyone with heart.

This being a YA novel, don't expect for the sex scenes to be explicit. I'd call this "PG-13" sex, leaving much to the imagination, but still with enough details to make the point. The emotional content is much more intense; there's several scenes that I suspect many readers will find very moving, and at least a couple that are almost heart-breaking. And this ain't no "after-school special"; the story and characters ring very true to me, without the "happily ever after" gloss of similar stories and TV shows.

Five-star reviews get handed out much too often here on Amazon, but I think POISON OAK clearly deserves one.
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