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Running Weblogs with Slash ePub download

by Brian Aker,David Krieger,Chromatic

  • Author: Brian Aker,David Krieger,Chromatic
  • ISBN: 0596001002
  • ISBN13: 978-0596001001
  • ePub: 1716 kb | FB2: 1845 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Web Development & Design
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (January 2002)
  • Pages: 282
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 131
  • Format: rtf docx mobi lrf
Running Weblogs with Slash ePub download

Slash has spawned several imitators.

Slash has spawned several imitators. Slash is based on open source technologies (Perl, Apache, and MySQL), and it makes use of open protocols (XML and RDF) for exchanging headlines with other sites. Anyone who wants to get a weblog site up and running will want to read this book, particularly system administrators who may not have the time or the background to learn all about Slash by reading the source code.

The heart of this book looks at how Slash works and what features you'll need to master to run a Web log .

The heart of this book looks at how Slash works and what features you'll need to master to run a Web log effectively. Written with notable wit, Running Weblogs with Slash will allow just about anyone to get started with Slash successfully, whether you want to run it out of the box or do more heavy-duty customization. Along with some valuable technical detail, it provides an in-depth look at one of the most intriguing open-source software efforts to emerge from recent online culture.

This book is about the ideas, challenges and designs which keep Slashdot working. Although the slash software is written in Perl, you don't need to read Perl; there's hardly any source code in the book. When I first saw this book, I thought it would be dull

This book is about the ideas, challenges and designs which keep Slashdot working. When I first saw this book, I thought it would be dull.

Running Weblogs with Slash book. chromatic, David Krieger.

Chromatic, Brian Aker, Dave Krieger. Slash is the open source software system that drives the Slashdot web site and others.

Running Weblogs with Slash by David Krieger, Brian Aker, Chromatic. Thanks to the introduction of templates in Slash ., you can change your site’s layout, look and feel, and even behavior using only the web interface

Running Weblogs with Slash by David Krieger, Brian Aker, Chromatic. Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform. With Safari, you learn the way you learn best., you can change your site’s layout, look and feel, and even behavior using only the web interface. This chapter focuses on wall decorations, while Chapter 10 delves into deeper tricks, including colors, page layout, and rewiring the outlets to put a TV in the lavatory. Blocks and Slashboxes. No matter what Topics a weblog covers, it will always require fresh content. In Slash terms, these are Stories. Consequently, most Authors will spend their time in the Stories list

Chromatic; Aker, Brian; Krieger, Dave. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on March 19, 2015.

Chromatic; Aker, Brian; Krieger, Dave. Blogs, Web publishing. Sebastopol, CA : O'Reilly. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Find nearly any book by David Krieger. David Krieger (Krieger, David). used books, rare books and new books. Running Weblogs with Slash. by Chromatic, Brian Aker, David Krieger. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Find all books by 'David Krieger' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'David Krieger'. ISBN 9780978847555 (978-788475-5-5) Softcover, Artamo Press, 2007. ISBN 9780596001001 (978-0-596-00100-1) Softcover, O'Reilly Media, 2002. Find signed collectible books: 'Running Weblogs with Slash'.

Slash is the open source software system that drives the hugely popular Slashdot web site and many others. Slash implements the kind of web site that has come to be called a "weblog": a moderated list, in reverse chronological order, of timely items with links to further discussion on-site, or to further information off-site. Essentially, a weblog is a cooperatively authored daily newspaper for some defined community on the net.

Slash has spawned several imitators. The existence of so many different systems for operating a weblog site demonstrates that there are many people and groups on the net who want to run their own online community newspapers. Slash is based on open source technologies (Perl, Apache, and MySQL), and it makes use of open protocols (XML and RDF) for exchanging headlines with other sites.

Anyone who wants to get a weblog site up and running will want to read this book, particularly system administrators who may not have the time or the background to learn all about Slash by reading the source code. Content managers of Slash sites who want to be able to use the system more effectively will also benefit from this book, which organizes the knowledge currently distributed throughout the Slash source code, Slashcode web site, and mailing lists, and provides it in an organized package.

Swordsong
I would have loved a 'type these commands to install' type thing in the book. Even with the book's help it took me a while to install.
Captain America
Slash is the software that runs sites like Slashdot and use.perl. It's all written in Perl using the Template Toolkit with MySQL at the back end. Despite it being based on a number of my favourite technologies, I'd never really the time to get to know how it worked. Reviewing this book finally gave me the excuse to spend a few hours looking at it. I decided the best way to "test" the book would to be to try and set up and configure a Slash web site whilst reading the book.
The book starts by giving an overview of Slashdot - the site that the Slash code grew out of. This is followed by an overview of how a Slash site looks to the user and a brief look at the architecture of Slash. All very interesting, but it didn't get me any closer to setting up my Slash site.
That started in chapter 2, which is a guide to installing Slash. During this chapter I became aware that the book (or, at least, this part of it) wasn't really aimed at me. By this I mean that the chapter assumed that the reader knows less than I do about installing Perl modules, setting up MySQL databases and configuring Apache. I was fast coming to the conclusion the the book's target audience was people who wanted to run a weblog using Slash, but didn't really know very much about Apache, MySQL or Perl. This made reading this chapter very quick and in an hour or so I had a basic Slash site up and running.
The next five chapters look at the nuts and bolts of running a Slash site. They describes the processes of setting up authors, editing and updating stories, reviewing and approving submissions, dealing with comments and managing topics and sections. Again, I read all of this pretty quickly as the chapters were going over in some detail processes that I was finding pretty easy to work out from the layout of the Slash administration pages. One section stood out. In the middle of chapter 6 there is a discussion on how Perls's regular expressions can be used to filter comments. I found myself wondering how easily my assumed target audience would deal with this material.
Chapter 8 changes direction completely. This chapter discusses ways to manage the community that builds up around a successful Slash site. It was almost completely non-technical but, building on their ideas of what has made Slashdot so successful the authors present some interesting ideas on the nature of web communities. To me, this chapter alone justifies reading the book.
In chapter 9 we're back with customising your site, with sections on setting up Slashboxes (little areas of content that go down the side of a Slash site), exhanging headlines with other sites using XML and managing user polls. Again there's not much comlpex technical content in this chapter.
In the last two chapters we suddenly get very technical, looking at advanced site customisation and administration issues. In particular, when the advanced customisation chapter looks at plugins, it gives an example of how to write a plugin and this may well all be a bit confusing for the target audience I discussed earlier. This is aimed at someone who knows what they are doing when it comes to Perl and MySQL.
The five appendices act as a reference to the Slash codebase. They contain much in depth information about the database tables and the API exposed by the various Slash modules. Appendix C contains a useful introduction to the Template Toolkit, which Slash uses to create all of the actual HTML pages. There's a lot of information in this pages and they take up about a third of the book.
I suspect I've come across a little more negative that I intended in this review. I do think it's a very useful book and should be read by anyone running (or thinking of running) a site using Slash. My only problem is that is seems to be two half books joined together. The second half seems to be aimed at a far more technically literate audience than the first half.
But the bottom line is that I got my Slash site up and running and I know a lot more than I did about how to configure and administer it - so the book does what I wanted it to.
AfinaS
"Slashdot" is one of the busiest sites on the internet. Part newspaper, part bulletin board, part personal journal - just a casual mention on Slashdot has been enough to bring major web sites to their knees. Slashdot has lead the way in the high-traffic mass-participation web, and the software is free to download. This book is about the ideas, challenges and designs which keep Slashdot working. Although the slash software is written in Perl, you don't need to read Perl; there's hardly any source code in the book.
When I first saw this book, I thought it would be dull. Who wants to read documentation for a bunch of Perl scripts? As it turns out, the book is mostly case study and installation/configuration guide. Although obviously aimed at people considering using the open-source "slash" engine for their own sites, reading about how the Slashdot administrators evolved their software to cope with such astonishingly high traffic is quite inspirational. There is a lot of solid wisdom for anyone involved in maintaining web applications on the internet.
If you are designing or improving a public collaborative web application and want to be able to scale to massive traffic, this book is an important addition to your bookshelf. If you are curious about the growth and internals of Slashdot, it's worth a read. If you want a theoretical discussion, code listings, or product comparisons, look elsewhere.
Bralore
Slashdot is, of course, the original community weblog: "a moderated list, in reverse-chronological order, of timely items, with links to further discussion on-site, or to further information off-site.".
What David, chromatic, and Brian have done here is write a manual for Slash, the open-source code that underlies Slashdot and dozens of other communities. Slash is by far the most powerful community weblog technology out there, so a how-to manual is especially important.
If you're looking into setting up a community weblog that members can use to share links and stories, Slash is the power tool of choice. With the publication of "Running Weblogs with Slash," David, chromatic, and Brian make it much more likely that your Slash installation and management will go seamlessly!
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