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Linux TCP/IP Stack: Networking For Embedded Systems (Networking Series) ePub download

by Thomas Herbert

  • Author: Thomas Herbert
  • ISBN: 1584502843
  • ISBN13: 978-1584502845
  • ePub: 1763 kb | FB2: 1221 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Hardware & DIY
  • Publisher: Charles River Media; 1 edition (April 15, 2004)
  • Pages: 600
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 639
  • Format: lrf azw mobi docx
Linux TCP/IP Stack: Networking For Embedded Systems (Networking Series) ePub download

Linux TCP/IP Networking for Embedded Systems. It covers almost all Linux tcp/ip related design and implementation so the book is good enough to give you an overall picture of what the book claims to do: tcp/ip stack and how it is implemented in Linux.

Linux TCP/IP Networking for Embedded Systems. But the main issue with the book is that it is not easy to read and follow. When the author throw out some new ction/usage/etc. he not necessary gives enough explanation on them.

The Linux TCP/IP Stack: Networking for Embedded Systems 2/E provides an updated, in-depth guide to implementing and using the Linux TCP/IP stack in embedded systems projects. It begins with a general overview of TCP/IP networking. by Thomas Herbert (Author). ISBN-13: 978-1584504818.

Take A Detailed Tour of the Linux TCP/IP Stack! . This is a great resource for embedded systems programmers and engineers, as well as networking professionals interested in learning more about the implementation of Linux TCP/IP in the . kernel.

Take A Detailed Tour of the Linux TCP/IP Stack! The Linux TCP/IP Stack: Networking for Embedded Systems provides an in-depth guide to implementing and using the Linux TCP/IP stack in embedded systems projects. It begins with a general overview of TCP/IP networking, with background information on applicable networking standards.

Cisco Networking Academy Program CCNA 1 and 2 Companion Guide, Revised . required to build Linux into embedded systems Programming Embedded.

So You Wanna Be an Embedded Engineer: The Guide to Embedded Engineering, From Consultancy. World War II. 1,585 Pages·1997·32. 35 MB·26,581 Downloads. 22 MB·15,023 Downloads.

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Providing a detailed guide to implementing and using the Linux TCP/IP stack in embedded systems projects, this text begins with a general overview of the TCP/IP networking, with background information on applicable networking standards.

The Linux TCP/IP Stack-Networking for Embedded Systems Thomas F. Herbert. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any way, stored in a retrieval system of any type, or transmitted by any means or media, electronic or mechanical, including, but not limited to, photocopy, recording, or scanning, without prior permission in writing from the publisher

The Linux TCP IP Stack: Networking for Embedded Systems (Networking Series). An elementary treatise on differential equations and their applications. Henry Thomas Herbert Piaggio.

The Linux TCP IP Stack: Networking for Embedded Systems (Networking Series). Category: Компьютеры, Операционные системы. Category: Mathematics, Calculus, Differential equations. 8 Mb. Linux TCP-IP Stack. Networking for Embedded Systems. Category: Computer Science, Linux And Unix. 5 Mb. The Linux TCP/IP Stack: Networking for Embedded Systems. From there, it details the TCP/IP implementation in Linux by following a packet of data as it flows through the stack from the sending system, out the wire, and back through the input side of the stack in the receiving machine. This unique approach gives programmers an inside look at the entire process.

The Linux TCP/IP Stack: Networking for Embedded Systems provides an in-depth guide to implementing and using the Linux TCP/IP stack in embedded systems projects. It begins with a general overview of TCP/IP networking, with background information on applicable networking standards. From there, it details the TCP/IP implementation in Linux 2.6 by following a packet of data as it flows through the stack from the sending system, out the wire, and back through the input side of the stack in the receiving machine. This unique approach gives programmers an "inside" look at the entire process. Throughout the text, topics of particular interest to engineers implementing embedded systems are discussed, such as sockets, network interfaces, application layer protocols, and practical considerations. This is a great resource for embedded systems programmers and engineers, as well as networking professionals interested in learning more about the implementation of Linux TCP/IP in the 2.6 kernel.
I_LOVE_228
I have not finished reading the whole book yet so the review is based on the first a hundred pages I read.

The author apparently has plenty of knowledge about networking and Linux and his description about networking code in Linux (like device drivers in first part of the book) is generally very detailed. It covers almost all Linux tcp/ip related design and implementation so the book is good enough to give you an overall picture of what the book claims to do: tcp/ip stack and how it is implemented in Linux.

But the main issue with the book is that it is not easy to read and follow. When the author throw out some new concept/variable/function/usage/etc., he not necessary gives enough explanation on them. Sometimes there is no explanation at all. This makes you have more questions when you read on. Eventually these more questions overwhelm you and make you stop and start thinking how/why all these things work. I really like the writing style of two other books in Linux: Robert Love's Linux Kernel Development and Rubini/Corbet's Linux Device Drivers. Any new topic/concept/variable is accompanied with notes/explanations/usage on how/why such is such. This difference makes this one a 4-star, instead of 5-star.

By all means, read the above two books (and maybe other books on Linux kernels) before reading this one. Read this one when you feel you are comfortable with device driver, kernel development

and tcp/ip protocol. Otherwise you make feel disappointed or confused.
santa
This book is not good to understand TCP/IP stack in Linux. The book has not gone through review for wrong section references. I have seen references mentioning to Chapter 4 when it actually is Chapter 7.
It never explains the main processing of TCP like cwnd update and sshthresh. After reading the whole book I still didnt understand what is done in TCP like which function does what.

A complete failure to qualify as a good book.

I suggest "Understanding Linux Network Internals" which explains very clearly what is done in IP. I expect that the author of that book comes up with a second volume that deals with TCP.
Nalaylewe
Loads of info, all's good, but it's a struggle. I mean, explanations don't match the pictures, a lot of redundancies in the text (that make you wonder if perchance they're not redundancies and force you to backtrack -- to no avail, 'cause they *are* redundancies); strange hyphenation habits ("pre-pending and removal"... well, then make it "re-moval", be consistent, at least... "pre-allocated", "de-allocated", etc.); on one line it's "sk_buff" on the next it's "skb" -- I mean THIS IS NOT POETRY! This is a lot of precise, dumb and boring literal-minded stuff that, in order to be understood, HAS TO BE RIGHT! every time, all the time). p.256, "The array of frags is placed in memory ... It can contain as many as six pages in the array." In which array? Does this mean IT ITSELF contains six pages of memory, or does mean that it happens to be in possession of yet another array -- and it is this other array that holds the aforementioned memory pages?

OK, it is an unfortunate fact of life that techies are massively deprived of the aptitude for verbal communication, fine, but where's the editor? It's a fifty-dollar book, for chrissakes. The book is very irritating in this respect.

Otoh, it's got a lot of good stuff, so, in a paroxysm of charitableness, I'll give it four stars after all. But it's darn hard to read, 'cause the author, though he knows his stuff, is an inarticulate turdhead, and the editor took a nap -- 'cause, you know, you'll buy it anyway, why bother.

Four stars, but only this time.

PS. Be sceptical about the review by John Matlock "Gunny" (right below here). This guy cannot possibly have read what he's reviewed; to convince yourself, please visit his reviews page and count the number of reviews he posts daily, every day, since the beginning of time. A dozen of all-positive reviews every day -- yeah, I believe he's read these books. Buyer beware ("Gunny" is not alone: there are quite a few "reviewers" like that on Amazon these days; when you see one of those "Top Reviewers", be sceptical, check their reviewing record; I've seen people reviewing over a hundred books per day every day; others re-type a cover blurb or table of contents; there's a lot of smart alecks of this sort, so watch out).

PPS. A couple of things I forgot to mention, but probably should have: first, there's nothing specifically embedded in this book; and second, there's a similar O'Reilly Linux networking book that is by an order of magnitude better. I didn't have it when I wrote this review (which was more than a year ago), but now I do and can compare. I forget the title off the top of my head, but search for it, it's easy to find. If I were writing a review for this book today, I'd not give it more than three stars -- though again, there's got a lot of good info in it: the book isn't bad technically, just confusingly written.
Mazuzahn
This is an in-depth guide to implementing and using the Linux TCP/IP stack. It begins with a general overview of TCP/IP networking, with background information on applicable networking standards. From there, it details the TCP/IP implementation in Linux by following a pack of data as it flows through the stack from the sending system, out the wire, and back through the input side of the stack in the receiving machine. This unique approach gives programmers an inside look at the entire process.

The book is aimed at th engineers and programmers implementing dedicated or embedded systems including sockets, network interfaces, application protocols and practical considerations.

The CD included with the book includes the source code developed in the book, much of which can be modified to fit many quasi-standard applications, and a considerable amount of additional technical information on Linux and the particular aspects of TCP/IP.
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