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Falling: How Our Greatest Fear Became Our Greatest Thrill--A History ePub download

by Garrett Soden

  • Author: Garrett Soden
  • ISBN: 0393054136
  • ISBN13: 978-0393054132
  • ePub: 1366 kb | FB2: 1309 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Miscellaneous
  • Publisher: W W Norton & Co Inc; 1st edition (June 2003)
  • Pages: 224
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 378
  • Format: azw mobi lrf rtf
Falling: How Our Greatest Fear Became Our Greatest Thrill--A History ePub download

Falling: How Our Greatest. has been added to your Cart. According to Soden (Hook Spin Buzz), falling became a sensation in the 18th century when the stunts of "gravity performers" offered a form of mass entertainment; since then, our preoccupation has only grown.

Falling: How Our Greatest. Soden's exploration of gravity heroes and antiheroes is encyclopedic, ranging from trapeze inventor Jules L‚otard to the great Wallendas and skateboarding legend Tony Hawke.

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This colourful history of purposeful plummeting shows how the act of taking. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Falling: How Our Greatest Fear Became Our Greatest Thrill-A History as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This colourful history of purposeful plummeting shows how the act of taking a fall has evolved from a symbol of wickedness to the inspiration .

This colourful history of purposeful plummeting shows how the act of taking a fall has evolved from a symbol of wickedness to the inspiration behind much of today's recreation. Soden takes us on a hair-raising tour through the fascinating legacy of nineteenth and twentieth-century daredevils and madcaps: high-divers who became folk heroes, tightrope walkers who drew thousands and parachutists who challenged the certainty of suffocation during free fall

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Falling by Garrett Soden 306pp, Norton, £1. 9. The path of virtue, said Thomas Browne at the beginning of his Christian Morals, is not only narrow: it's "funambulatory", a tightrope over an abyss. Milton's Satan had the longest of all falls: "from Morn, To Noon he fell, from Noon to dewy Eve,, A Summers day; and with the setting Sun, Dropt from the Zenith like a falling Star

Garrett Soden, author of the book Falling: How Our Greatest Fear Became Our Greatest Thrill, likens a long fall to a three-act tragedy: the leap, the fall, the impact

Garrett Soden, author of the book Falling: How Our Greatest Fear Became Our Greatest Thrill, likens a long fall to a three-act tragedy: the leap, the fall, the impact. He writes, The second act functions as it does in any tragedy: it reveals that the victim’s moral failure will lead to a horrible end - and that nothing can be done to stop it. Is the fear of heights then ultimately a fear of being discovered (by oneself), of having one’s moral failings put on display (to oneself)? Is Scottie’s acrophobia just a symptom of his guilty conscience? And guilty of what? Why?

In Falling, Garrett Soden tells the astonishing story of how taking a fall has evolved from an experience that the ancients used as a metaphor for damnation to one so prized that today millions crave its intense rush.

In Falling, Garrett Soden tells the astonishing story of how taking a fall has evolved from an experience that the ancients used as a metaphor for damnation to one so prized that today millions crave its intense rush. No current Talk conversations about this book.

In Falling: How Our Greatest Fear Became Our Greatest Thrill-A History. Soden explores the human fascination and phobia of falling as it has become an element in popular sports. Tracing the human fascination with scaling heights back through time, Soden acquaints readers with individuals who have made falling-related activities either their hobby or career. Particularly with the technological advances of the late twentieth century, sports involving heights have increased in popularity, as Soden can himself attest.

Falling: How Our Greatest Fear Became Our Greatest Thrill-A History. ISBN 13: 9780393054132.

Our greatest fear is not that we are inadequate, but that we are powerful beyond measure. And, as we let our own light shine, we consciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our fear, our presence automatically liberates others. Author: Marianne Williamson.

A historical look at the concept of free-fall, from its origination by drunken British brawlers to the thrill seekers of today, describes how the sport has taken the world by storm, revealing the psychological significance of its performers, the future of the sport in the athletic forum, and the impact on our daredevil society through extreme sports and virtual reality technology.
Gavinrage
I'm not a mountain climber, skateboarder, surfer, skydiver or daredevil of any kind. I've never much liked roller coasters, especially as I get older and experience vertigo. But that didn't stop me from appreciating this book. Impeccably researched and beautifully written, Garrett Soden weaves together a wide-ranging exploration of the human fascination with the effects of gravity--a reckoning which covers more ground than you'd ever imagine. Personal favorite sections include those devoted to high-wire acts over Niagara Falls; the fatal attraction of the Golden Gate Bridge; the relentless minimalistic push of wall climbers to return to our primate origins; and the sections exploring our biological and anthropological roots, which gave rise in me to a surprising pride that our most distant ancestors were not complete physical pushovers. They were, in fact, the most versatile acrobats in the jungle. This book reminds me a bit of Longitude by Dava Sobel, or Salt by Mark Kurlansky. Where those works examined a scientific breakthrough, or a particular substance, and remarked upon its role in the development of the world, Mr. Soden's focus is on a physical experience and its relentless grip on our imagination.
Goodman
It is a dream almost everyone has had: you are falling, falling... and then you wake up with a shock. There is even folklore that if you dream that you hit the ground, you die before you wake up (how could anyone tell this?). The universal falling dream is not mentioned in _Falling: How Our Greatest Fear Became Our Greatest Thrill - A History_ (Norton) by Garrett Soden, but the book brightly examines the universality of thinking about falling, fearing it, and enjoying it. The fascination and fear of falling is so basic that it undoubtedly came to us from our arboreal ancestors. We are land animals; if we swim or take to the air, we are doing something unnatural. The time we have been on the ground and walking upright is actually much less than the time we were in the trees. We fear falling, but we get a kick out of a controlled fall, perhaps because controlled falling was necessary as we swung among the trees, and uncontrolled falling was to be avoided. We are newcomers to the flat world, but we carry with us instinctive respect for the power of gravity, and for the kicks it can give us.
It is a surprise that a history could be written about falling, but according to Soden, the real history of falling starts in the eighteenth century. Before that time, people were simply terrified of it. Even acrobats stuck basically to the ground and did not fall very far. Not only did people do their best to avoid high falls, they did not for amusement watch others risking high falls. But in the eighteenth century gravity performers became stars. Springboard leapers, mountaineers, and parachutists gave audiences thrills. Many authorities detested that the public liked such things, even though the performers insisted that they were making scientific explorations, not barbarous entertainments. The movies proved to be a fine showcase for falling stunts, and stuntmen became a new profession. Many of the gravity activities have now blossomed into the "Extreme Sports" that are popular with young people. BMX biking, skateboarding, barefoot water-ski jumping, bungee jumping, and free-solo rock climbing (without ropes) all have their adherents, and their place on television. If you lack coordination for such activities, there is always the amusement park.
Although much of this book is devoted to "not falling" or at least not getting hurt in doing so, there is also a serious review of risk-taking and what sort of people do it. Research has shown that the "death wish" hypothesized by Freud is simply not working in those who take part in such activities, although it may seem to the rest of us that they are getting excitement by courting death. There are high-sensation types and low-sensation types, but the high-sensation types don't enjoy risk any more than anyone else. For instance, they use such things as seat belts and condoms at the same rate as most people. It turns out that high-risk people who are engaged in such things as free-solo rock climbing do the simple, rational thing: they reduce risk by increasing their skill. It may well be that the neural wiring of the highs is indeed different from the lows and may be able to process lots of incoming data more efficiently. Soden goes on to show that our languages reflect the negative nature of falls, as in "falling down on the job". Icarus fell, and Lucifer fell. Yet we chase the sensation of falling, or the danger of a potential fall. Soden's surprising book gives amusing insight into the paradoxical attractiveness of rapid descent.
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