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Beyond Glory: Max Schmeling vs. Joe Louis and a World on the Brink ePub download

by David Margolick

  • Author: David Margolick
  • ISBN: 0747561850
  • ISBN13: 978-0747561859
  • ePub: 1522 kb | FB2: 1840 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Individual Sports
  • Publisher: BLOOMSBURY PUBLISHING PLC; New Ed edition (August 21, 2006)
  • Pages: 432
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 982
  • Format: txt rtf mobi mbr
Beyond Glory: Max Schmeling vs. Joe Louis and a World on the Brink ePub download

The Louis-Schmeling rematch came on June 22, 1938 – one year from the day Louis had won the world Heavyweight title. Margolick, David (2005). Beyond Glory: Joe Louis Vs. Max Schmeling, and a World on the Brink. New York: Vintage Books. ISBN 978-0-375-72619-4.

The Louis-Schmeling rematch came on June 22, 1938 – one year from the day Louis had won the world Heavyweight title. The fighters met once again in a sold-out Yankee Stadium in New York City. Among the more than 70,000 fans in attendance were Clark Gable, Douglas Fairbanks, Gary Cooper, Gregory Peck, and J. Edgar Hoover  . Myler, Patrick (2005). Ring of Hate: Joe Louis vs. Max Schmeling: The Fight of the Century.

So, Louis vs Schmeling Democracy vs fascism, Louis vs Schmeling black vs white, and Louis vs Schmeling . We also get many chapter notes and a well-composed index.

So, Louis vs Schmeling Democracy vs fascism, Louis vs Schmeling black vs white, and Louis vs Schmeling unfairness vs fairness. Also, to many people, Louis vs Schmeling fairness vs unfairness. These people considered Schmeling unfair because he represented an anti-semitic, anti-social, and uncivilized government. As I was reading the last few pages in BEYOND GLORY, I watched the documentary movie JOE LOUIS: AMERICA'S HERO BETRAYED. With it and the book I now understand why the legendary Louis-Schmeling fight ended as it did.

Nothing in the annals of sports has aroused more passion than the heavyweight fights in New York in 1936 and 1938 between Joe Louis and Max Schmeling bouts that symbolized the hopes, hatreds, and fears of a world moving toward total war. Acclaimed journalist David. Acclaimed journalist David Margolick takes us into the careers of both men a black American and a Nazi German hero and depicts the extraordinary buildup to their legendary 1938 rematch.

So, Louis vs Schmeling Democracy vs fascism, Louis vs Schmeling black vs white, and Louis vs. . Of course for most Jews, Louis vs Schmeling Jews vs Nazis. Author David Margolick provides readers with details regarding how and why Louis got his chance for the title when it was supposed to be Schmeling's chance. He gives loads of other details too.

Beyond Glory" is a nice, long Harper's Magazine feature on the second fight between Joe Louis and Max Schmeling expanded into 351 pages of padding

Beyond Glory" is a nice, long Harper's Magazine feature on the second fight between Joe Louis and Max Schmeling expanded into 351 pages of padding. Details such as the amount of money the city of Livermore CA bet on Max Baer, or quotes from the magazine of Germany's SS, are simply pointless, though David Margolick seems to feel that endless accretion of detail enhances rather than buries a narrative.

Acclaimed journalist David Margolick takes us into the careers of both men - a black American and a Nazi German .

Acclaimed journalist David Margolick takes us into the careers of both men - a black American and a Nazi German hero - and depicts the extraordinary buildup to their legendary 1938 rematch. Vividly capturing the outpouring of emotion that the two fighters brought forth, Margolick brilliantly illuminates the cultural and social divisions that they came to represent. In 1936 and again in 1938, American heavyweight Joe Louis fought Germany's Max Schmeling in monumental bouts in New York's Yankee Stadium-the second time for the championship title.

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Acclaimed journalist David Margolick takes us into the careers of both men †a black American and a Nazi German hero †and depicts the extraordinary buildup to their legendary 1938 rematch.

January 1987 · The Journal of Modern History.

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Gugrel
On June 22, 1938 in Yankee Stadium, New York City, Joe Louis and Max Schmeling met in a boxing contest that was bloated with ethical and political overtones. Louis represented democracy, poverty, and persecuted races. Schmeling represented totalitarian order, might, and Aryan supremacy. It drew attention across the globe.

To boxing fans it also presented a chance to settle who was the real champion. "Officially" Louis was the champion, but he had won the title by butting in line. When it was--according to fair and traditional rules of boxing--Schmeling's turn to fight James Braddock for the championship, Louis fought Braddock instead, and Louis won to gain the title. Because of this, Germany and much of Europe disparaged the machinations of American boxing, and Schmeling touted himself as the real champ.

So, Louis vs Schmeling = Democracy vs fascism, Louis vs Schmeling = black vs white, and Louis vs Schmeling = unfairness vs fairness. Also, to many people, Louis vs Schmeling = fairness vs unfairness. These people considered Schmeling unfair because he represented an anti-semitic, anti-social, and uncivilized government. Of course for most Jews, Louis vs Schmeling = Jews vs Nazis.

Author David Margolick provides readers with details regarding how and why Louis got his chance for the title when it was supposed to be Schmeling's chance. He gives loads of other details too. In fact, despite the book's title, only a few pages of the book are devoted directly to the 1938 Louis-Schmeling fight, though those few pages are enough to give readers a "You Are There" feeling. We also learn the backgrounds of Louis and Schmeling, we meet their families and colorful associates (Schmeling's manager was ironically a Jew), and we tune into the culture. Margolick does this largely with words from contemporary journalists. Which is a good thing. It preserves Margolick's neutrality as well as invoking the humor and spirit of the time.

Two sets of seventy-seven photos, including a few newspaper clippings, bring the reader closer to the real scene. We also get many chapter notes and a well-composed index.

As I was reading the last few pages in BEYOND GLORY, I watched the documentary movie JOE LOUIS: AMERICA'S HERO BETRAYED. With it and the book I now understand why the legendary Louis-Schmeling fight ended as it did. I won't convey my understanding because that would spoil the matter. You can do your own thinking. But I will tell you what did NOT determine the ending: Race.
Via
Beyond Glory places the heavyweight boxing championship matches between LOUIS and SCHMELING directly in the path of the evolution of the Nazi Party in Germany, the depression, and the rebirth of civil liberties between the, then, two dominant races of the United States. I found the mixture of the above most compelling, and revealing of the atmosphere that existed in the 1930's.

Although the text is totally dependent on quotations from the writers of that era, it is just that, that provides the color and texture of the period. Quotes from Runyon, Lardner. Hemingway, and a myriad of others from dozens of newspapers and periodicals, intersticed among those from American regional locations and Germany provide an in depth view of the pulse, feelings and tempo of those days. This was a period that preceded "political correctness" and was a time when the imperfect, but free, American way could be viewed in comparison with the repressed and savage nature of the German regime.

For those unable to recall that decade, this book should be an eye opener. So very much has changed in the world and in our country during the intervening time that it is hard to believe that all of this occurred just two generations ago.
Doomredeemer
I write this review as a 50 year old baby boomer, who as a child lived in the South through the civil rights struggles of the 60s, having parents from New York City, having a father who trod across Europe in W.W.II, and having family lost and damaged by Nazi terror. Despite that, and despite knowing so much of that history, the doors to the past opened by David Margolick's Beyond Glory were wonderfully and surprisingly illuminating.

Margolick does this by not just retelling the wonderful story of these classic boxing matches, but by presenting much of the story through the words of the journalists of the day. In doing so, the book carefully chronicles the paths to and from these historic fights, and in doing so, not only tells the tale of wonderful boxing characters, but exposes both the pervasiveness of racism in America, and the astonishing face of anti-Semitism and racism that was the Third Reich. Even though it is recent history, which we think we know well, it is still surprising to see and understand the clarity and depth of these issues as reported in Beyond Glory, in part through the eyes and words of an earlier generation of newspaper reporters. (As newspapers today shrink and consolidate, the creativity and glory of those reporters is especially interesting.)

The magic of what Margolick has done is to present the history of the Louis-Schmeling fights by weaving the words of the journalists of the day, reporters long silent, who wrote in the style of the day--and with the prejudices of the day. Margolick does not spare us the ugly side of either American racism, or German repression. Mainstream American journalism bluntly writing about this "colored boy," northern cities (not just southern) with segregated fight attendance, German media bluntly assailing the evil Jewish control of all things American, the weakness of American reliance upon Louis, a man from an "inferior race".

We all know these things, but to read them in the day to day quotidian press of those times gives vivid life to those years. One can see the social struggle far beyond the ring where these fights were waged, and it is truly eye opening. As well, it is fascinating to see the frightening German press, and on the American side, two different press corps, the white press, and the black press. Amid the racism of the thirties, there stirred the growing civil rights movement in a vital black press (now largely forgotten) with its own distinct voice, again brought to life in Beyond Glory.

By not only reporting on the history of these famous fights, but fully immersing us literally in the words of the day, Margolick brings vivid life and reality to an extraordinarily important transition in history. By putting us back in those days, he not only well presents the course of these fights, the wonderfully colorful characters of the boxing game, the descent of the world into war, but gives a different understanding of our own history than might be expected. Beyond Glory does not just retell history, it puts the reader in the time, thereby creating something very vital and unexpected--a sometimes uncomfortable understanding of "a world on the brink".
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