» » Those Feet: A Sensual History of English Football

Those Feet: A Sensual History of English Football ePub download

by David Winner

  • Author: David Winner
  • ISBN: 0747579148
  • ISBN13: 978-0747579144
  • ePub: 1240 kb | FB2: 1797 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Football (American)
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC; First Edition edition (2006)
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 889
  • Format: docx mobi azw lrf
Those Feet: A Sensual History of English Football ePub download

Duncan White, FourFourTwo.

Duncan White, FourFourTwo. As finds acceptance, and even fondness, for the English game, his insight, humor, warmth, and enthusiasm place him in the top echelon of soccer writers. With an easy wit, Winner traces the game back to its roots and the results are as intriguing as they are amusing. Duncan White, FourFourTwo.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Those Feet: A Sensual History of English Football as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Well, Winner does a great job of marshalling his evidence and proving that hysteria about self-pollution was a very .

Well, Winner does a great job of marshalling his evidence and proving that hysteria about self-pollution was a very real thing for the Victorians. Another chapter I particularly liked talked about Roy Keane, the tough and rather violent captain of MANU. Plumbing the depths of the English psyche, Winner believes that football beginnings began in the late 19th century Victorian morality play when school headmasters sought release for the young lads' raging testosterone (" the pampered passion") through strenuous and competitive athletics.

Those Feet: A Sensual History of English Football. With the same insightful eye he brought to his bestselling study of Dutch soccer, Winner shows how Victorian sexual anxiety underlies England’s many World Cup failures. He reveals the connection between Roy Keane and a soldier who never lived but died in the Charge of the Light Brigade.

Football, Winner says, has become a vehicle for deeper anxieties about England's standing in the world

Football, Winner says, has become a vehicle for deeper anxieties about England's standing in the world. In this ambitious book, he takes the quintessential elements of the English game and traces them back to their origins in his singular, tangential way. It is effectively a follow-up to his Brilliant Orange: the neurotic genius of Dutch football: a mesmerising trip through the humanities. When he kicks off Those Feet by invoking an Egyptian creation myth involving sacred masturbation to explain football's beginnings, you get a clear sense of what you're in for.

David Winner's solid defence is let down by fanciful attacking in Those Feet, says . This is a not unhelpful practice Winner's opening essay makes the persuasive case that football was invented as an alternative to masturbation.

David Winner's solid defence is let down by fanciful attacking in Those Feet, says Will Buckley. This is a not unhelpful practice. A book that starts with a bet in a pub is unlikely to contain many footnotes. The idea for David Winner's follow-up to his well-received Brilliant Orange: The Neurotic Genius of Dutch Football came to him during a discussion with a French friend after he had watched England perform poorly in a friendly football match. Winner's opening essay makes the persuasive case that football was invented as an alternative to masturbation. He introduces us to the brothers Thring.

David Winner (born 5 December 1956) is an English author and journalist. He lives in Kilburn, London. His best-known books are Those Feet: An Intimate History of English Football (2005), and Brilliant Orange: The Neurotic Genius of Dutch Football (2000). Brilliant Orange was shortlisted for the William Hill Sports Book of the Year in 2000. The book explains why the football players of the Netherlands play beautifully but lose their most important matches

He shows how Victorian sexual anxiety underlies England's many World Cup failures. He reveals the connection between Roy Keane and a soldier who died in the Charge of the Light Brigade. And, he demonstrates how thick mud and wet leather shaped the contours of the English soul.

He shows how Victorian sexual anxiety underlies England's many World Cup failures.

Book by David Winner
Gandree
Interesting read on English football.
allegro
This one’s an odd duck. Basically, the author tries to weave together a history of English soccer with a cultural history and analysis of the UK. That sounds like rather a reach, but it actually works quite well.

Some examples? Well, we start out with the idea of vigorous exercise and athletics in support of masculine Christianity in general and against masturbation in particular. Does the latter part sound a bit much? Well, Winner does a great job of marshalling his evidence and proving that hysteria about “self-pollution” was a very real thing for the Victorians.

Another chapter I particularly liked talked about Roy Keane, the tough and rather violent captain of MANU. The chapter doesn’t actually talk about Roy that much, but goes over similar characters – oddly, named Roy, Kean, or even Royal Keene and Royston Keene – that appeared in mass culture media like school stories, comics, popular novels, etc. Really fascinating. I had to look some of this stuff up just to make sure it was all real. How did he manage all that research?

The chapter I didn’t care for so much was about the relationship between English and Italian soccer. I take it the main theme was something along the lines of English power and lack of imagination vs. Italian skills and an emphasis on defense, but it was a bit hard to follow. There was also a lot of the chapter devoted to two British films I’d never seen – the Italian Job and Sleuth – which seemed a bit obscure and tangential to the argument.

Actually, this last bit throws a spotlight on something rather important about this book. I’m not sure I'd recommend this book for anyone who isn’t already pretty familiar with English soccer and English history and culture. If you are, though, it's is an absolute gem.

C'mon you Rams!
Bloodray
Not quite as intriguing as his "Brilliant Orange" book, but still a very interesting look at English soccer.
Simple
Plumbing the depths of the English psyche, Winner believes that football beginnings began in the late 19th century Victorian morality play when school headmasters sought release for the young lads' raging testosterone (" the pampered passion") through strenuous and competitive athletics. He ties it all to English sensibilities as seen through old legendary players, the few international victories and the many crushing defeats especially at the feet of the Italians, all of which means little to the American addicted to the Barclays Premier League. Forget the Queen, the Windsors, Big Ben, Shakespeare, this is the true heart of England according to Tom Winner.
E-Books Related to Those Feet: A Sensual History of English Football: