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The View from the Dugout: The Journals of Red Rolfe ePub download

by William M Anderson

  • Author: William M Anderson
  • ISBN: 0472031481
  • ISBN13: 978-0472031481
  • ePub: 1214 kb | FB2: 1128 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Baseball
  • Publisher: University of Michigan Press (February 16, 2006)
  • Pages: 350
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 531
  • Format: mobi lrf docx mbr
The View from the Dugout: The Journals of Red Rolfe ePub download

Charles C. Alexander, author of Breaking the Slump: Baseball in the Depression Era. "Red Rolfe was one of baseball's most astute observers. This is 'inside' baseball from the inside.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. After Independence: Making and Protecting the Nation in Postcolonial and Postcommunist States.

Red Rolfe's journals offer an opportunity to find out what a manager is thinking when no one is around to hear

Red Rolfe's journals offer an opportunity to find out what a manager is thinking when no one is around to hear. William M. Anderson is Director of the Department of History, Arts and Libraries for the State of Michigan. His books include The Detroit Tigers: A Pictorial Celebration of the Greatest Players and Moments in Tigers' History. combination with William M. Anderson's well-done text, The View from the Dugout will be of great interest to general readers and of immense value to students of baseball history. Charles C. Alexander, author of Breaking the Slump: Baseball in the Depression Era "Red Rolfe was one of baseball's most astute observers.

In combination with William M. Anderson's well-done text,The View from . Red Rolfe enjoyed a short three and a half seasons’ run as a big league manager. Anderson's well-done text,The View from the Dugoutwill be of great interest to general readers and of immense value to students of baseball history. -Charles C. Alexander, author ofBreaking the Slump: Baseball in the Depression Era"Red Rolfe was one of baseball's most astute observers. His books includeThe Detroit Tigers: A Pictorial Celebration of the Greatest Players and Moments in Tigers' History. eISBN: 978-0-472-02233-5. You are viewing the table of contents.

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The Journals of Red Rolfe. by William M Anderson. Published February 14, 2006 by University of Michigan Press.

Charles C.

"Somewhere, if they haven't been destroyed, there are hundreds of pages of typewritten notes about American League players of that era, notes which I would love to get my hands on."-Bill James, in The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract, on the journals of Red Rolfe"Red Rolfe's journal for his years as manager of the Detroit Tigers is the kind of precious source researchers yearn for. In combination with William M. Anderson's well-done text,The View from the Dugout will be of great interest to general readers and of immense value to students of baseball history."-Charles C. Alexander, author of Breaking the Slump: Baseball in the Depression Era"Red Rolfe was one of baseball's most astute observers. This is 'inside' baseball from the inside."-Donald Honig, author of Baseball America, Baseball When the Grass Was Real, and other books in the Donald HonigBest Players of All Time series"In his lucid journals Red Rolfe has provided an inside look at how an intelligent baseball manager thinks and prepares."-Ray Robinson, Yankee historian and author of Iron Horse: Lou Gehrig in His TimeBaseball players as a rule aren't known for documenting their experiences on the diamond. Red Rolfe, however, during his time as manager of the Detroit Tigers from 1949 to 1952, recorded daily accounts of each game, including candid observations about his team's performance. He used these observations to coach his players and to gain an advantage by recording strengths, weaknesses, and tendencies of opposing players and managers. Rolfe's journals carry added value considering his own career as an All-Star Yankee third baseman on numerous world champion teams, where he was a teammate of Lou Gehrig and Joe DiMaggio.Today, in the era of televised broadcasts, networks often wire a manager so that viewers can listen to his spontaneous comments throughout the game. Red Rolfe's journals offer an opportunity to find out what a manager is thinking when no one is around to hear.William M. Anderson is Director of the Department of History, Arts and Libraries for the State of Michigan. His books include The Detroit Tigers: A Pictorial Celebration of the Greatest Players and Moments in Tigers' History.
TheFresh
Author William Anderson edited this book on the journals of former Tigers' manager Red Rolfe for the same reason I read the book. He was 12 years old when his father took him and his brother to his first game in 1950 to see the Tigers, and he became hooked on Hoot Evers. As an 8 year old I was just becoming a Tiger fan in 1952 listening to the games on the radio with my grandfather when I became hooked on Johnny Groth. Unfortunately, this time period has been pretty much ignored in covering the team's history. The Bengals finished a respectable 4th in 1949 with Rolfe the Red at the helm, and made a run at the American League pennant in 1950 before finishing three games behind the New York Yankees. Unfortunately, with the exception of George Kell, the big bats of Wertz, Groth, and Evers were silenced in 1951 compared to the previous year. The pitching suffered as well with the loss of Art Houtteman to the army. Determined to add power to the lineup in 1952 Charley Gehringer, who had replaced Billy Evans as general manager, swung a big trade sending Kell, Evers, Johnny Lipon, and Paul "Dizzy" Trout to Boston in exchange for Walt Dropo, Fred Hatfield, Johnny Pesky, Don Lenhardt, and Bill Wight. Fred Hutchinson replaced Rolfe as manager, and the team actually played slightly worse under Hutch than it did for Rolfe as the team finished in last place for the first time in its history. This book was of special interest to me because it brought to life Red Rolfe's comments for the games he managed in Detroit at the time period I became interested in following them. Rolfe's wife faithfully kept score of the games to make it easier for him to have the time to write a journal. An important piece of Detroit Tigers' baseball history has been preserved for us thanks to Red Rolfe, his wife, and editor William Anderson. My only regret is that I wish my boyhood hero, Johnny Groth, had agreed to be interviewed by William Anderson.
OTANO
Most of the work is a review of the Tigers's games from 1949 thru 1952 summarizing the turning points in each contest with very little insight into the managerial strategy of Rolfe. At the end of each recap there are comments by Rolfe concerning the mundane perfomances of his players and why the game was won or lost. There should have been more emphasis on how Rolfe actually prepared for each game and the strategies that he planned employ against each opponent instead of the brief summaries that covered each game. A View from the Dugout was more like a review from the press box.
Perdana
gr8 reading
Saithi
I wouldn't suggest being the first book anyone gets or anything like that, but the book presents things that just weren't presented in any form back in the 1950s. Rolfe gives his impressions of a game and then occasionally drops notes to himself about players on the other team or even his squad. The book probably as a little more meaning to a Tiger fan, but I can see the interest being about the same for non-Tiger fans as well because of the material presented. It's more interesting to see the thinking of a manager through his journals. The 1950 Tiger season is represented so that's a plus for Tiger fans. Either this season or 1915 have to be the most under-appreciated strong Tiger seasons, so it's nice to see something about it in book form.

A 3 star is probably a bit unfair. If this was on a scale of 1 to 10, I would've given it a 7, so 3.5 stars is fair.
Cala
I found this book enthralling and (if the word hasn't been too overused to have lost all meaning) unique. Every baseball fan has heard and read countless postgame comments by managers and is all too aware that, for obvious reasons, such remarks are far from candid. Now managers are even interviewed during the game on many telecasts, but candor is still a rare commodity. What purports to be inside information consists far too often of timeworn truisms and meaningless cliches. By contrast, Red Rolfe's diaries, which were written contemporaneously and never intended for publication, give the reader unparallelled access to what really goes on inside a manager's head. Rolfe never pulls any punches in breaking down the factors that led to a specific victory or defeat. This book is a gem and William Anderson's skilled editing enhances its appeal.
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