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Spacetime and Electromagnetism: An Essay on the Philosophy of the Special Theory of Relativity ePub download

by P. E. Hodgson,J. R. Lucas

  • Author: P. E. Hodgson,J. R. Lucas
  • ISBN: 0198520387
  • ISBN13: 978-0198520382
  • ePub: 1223 kb | FB2: 1398 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Physics
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1st edition (July 19, 1990)
  • Pages: 328
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 911
  • Format: mbr lrf lit azw
Spacetime and Electromagnetism: An Essay on the Philosophy of the Special Theory of Relativity ePub download

That space and time should be integrated into a single entity, spacetime, is the great insight of Einstein's special theory of relativity, and leads us to regard spacetime as a fundamental context in which to make sense of the world around us. But it is not the only one. Causality is equally important and at least as far as the special theory goes, it cannot be subsumed under a fundamentally geometrical form of explanation. In fact, the agent of propagation of causal influence is electromagnetic radiation.

Sociology & Philosophy of Science. J. R. Lucas, P. E. Hodgson. Spacetime and Electromagnetism: An Essay on the Philosophy of the Special Theory of Relativity.

Certain fundamental concepts are vital to understanding the world around us, such as spacetime, covered by the special theory of relativity, and causality, the effect of random events, promoted by electromagnetism. Discussing these, the authors support a rationalist view of physics.

Lucas, J. and P. Hodgson (1990), Spacetime and Electromagnetism (Clarendon Press, Oxford). eBook Packages Springer Book Archive. Reprints and Permissions. Nicholas of Cusa 1440 (1954), De Docta Ignoratia, trans. G. Heron (Routledge and Kegan Paul, London). Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science, vol 192. Springer, Dordrecht. Personalised recommendations.

In physics, special relativity (also known as the special theory of relativity) is the generally accepted and experimentally confirmed physical theory regarding the relationship between space and time. In Albert Einstein's original pedagogical treatment, it is based on two postulates: the laws of physics are invariant (. identical) in all inertial frames of reference (.

the Special Theory of Relativity (STR) is really saying about physics . Electromagnetism, are the same for every inertial observer. Consequently, the spread of both General Relativity and Special Relativity began in 1921 as a result of the work and talent of various Mexican physics and mathematics professors.

History of special relativity. The history of special relativity consists of many theoretical results and empirical findings obtained by Albert A. Michelson, Hendrik Lorentz, Henri Poincaré and others. It culminated in the theory of special relativity proposed by Albert Einstein and subsequent work of Max Planck, Hermann Minkowski and others.

Lucas wrote several books on the philosophy of science and space-time (see below). Spacetime and Electromagnetism (with P. Hodgson). In The Future Lucas gives a detailed analysis of tenses and time, arguing that "the Block universe gives a deeply inadequate view of time.

Relativity (both the Special and General) theories, quantum mechanics, and thermody-namics are the three major . Other scientists were more accepting of the idea, however, with Maxwell’s theory of electromagnetism for a time seeming to provide some sort of conrmation of the concept.

Relativity (both the Special and General) theories, quantum mechanics, and thermody-namics are the three major theories on which modern physics is based. What is unique about these three theories, as distinct from say the theory of electromagnetism, is their generality. One of the predictions of Maxwell’s theory was that light was an electromagnetic wave that travelled with a speed c ≈ 3 108 ms−1. But relative to what?

That space and time should be integrated into a single entity, spacetime, is the great insight of Einstein's special theory of relativity, and leads us to regard spacetime as a fundamental context in which to make sense of the world around us. But it is not the only one. Causality is equally important and at least as far as the special theory goes, it cannot be subsumed under a fundamentally geometrical form of explanation. In fact, the agent of propagation of causal influence is electromagnetic radiation. In this examination, the authors find support for a rationalist approach to physics, never neglecting experimentation, but rejecting a simple empiricist or positivist view of science.
Jozrone
and suitable for self-study. Anyone who's studied standard textbooks on special relativity, e.g. French's Special Relativity (M.I.T. Introductory Physics), Taylor / Wheeler's Spacetime Physics or Woodhouse's Special Relativity (Springer Undergraduate Mathematics Series) will be quite familiar with the algebraic mechanics of Lorentz transformations, usually developed ground up from considerations of moving trains, light bouncing off mirrors, the radar rule or perhaps (as in Woodhouse) Bondi's elegant k-factor. And of course this'll be quite adequate for solving typical physics problems and moving on to another topic.

But you'll still have no idea how many conceptually distinct ways there are to derive the Lorentz transformations. This wonderful book will fill that gap, and assuming that you, like me, are interested in such conceptual matters, you'll find the book fun to read. Lest you think this topic is of interest only to philosophers, please be aware that a number of renowned physicists such as Pauli worked on various ways to derive the Lorentz transformations. One physicist -- whose name I cannot mention without Amazon blocking the review presumably because it is one letter away from a prohibited word -- derived them from the assumption that the Equivalence Principle holds for Newton's 1st Law and the wave equation. And as early as 1897, Voigt, whose work is often overlooked, derived them from the covariance of the wave equation! Not to mention the fascinating derivations of Robb, Zeeman, Winnie and Malament from logical assumptions about causality.

Note that one of the authors (Lucas) is a philosopher of science and the other (Hodgson) a physicist, which, I think, helps provide a balanced discussion of the topic.

There's much to learn and ponder in this wonderful book about the historical and logical development of special relativity and ultimately about its meaning. So if you're interested in these issues, I recommend you check it out.
Coiriel
It came quickly and in the condition they said it would be. What more can you expect.
The book itself is slightly different from many on this subject. It doesn't give the answers any better but it does an interesting job of identifying the questions.And it has a nice section on the interrelationship of many different approaches to the topic.
Sagda
One of the best "philosophy of science" books ever written. Truly remarkable in every way. If you have been teaching relativity and "faking" that you understand it, then buy this book, study it and you may gain actual understanding of Einstein's amazing ideas. It will certainly do a number on your head.
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