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Hunting the Largest Animals: Native Whaling in the Western Arctic and Subarctic (Occasional Publications Series) ePub download

by Allen P. McCartney

  • Author: Allen P. McCartney
  • ISBN: 0919058957
  • ISBN13: 978-0919058958
  • ePub: 1324 kb | FB2: 1640 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Nature & Ecology
  • Publisher: CCI Press; UK ed. edition (January 1, 1995)
  • Pages: 360
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 760
  • Format: lit txt lrf lrf
Hunting the Largest Animals: Native Whaling in the Western Arctic and Subarctic (Occasional Publications Series) ePub download

Edmonton: Canadian Circumpolar Institute, University of Alberta (Occasional Publication 36). xii + 345 p, illustrated, soft cover.

Edmonton: Canadian Circumpolar Institute, University of Alberta (Occasional Publication 36). Peter Whitridge (a1).

Hunting the Largest Animals book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Hunting the Largest Animals: Native Whaling in the Western Arctic and Subarctic as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Read by Canadian Circumpolar Institute.

E., Hunting the Largest Animals: Native Whaling in the western Arctic and Subarctic, Studies in Whaling No. 3, Occasional Paper No. 36. Circumpolar Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, pp. 1–32. The Northern World . 1100–1350: The Dynamics of Climate, Economy and Politics.

In Hunting the largest Animals: Native Whaling In the Western Arctic and Subarctic, e. Ipiutak and the Arctic Whale Hunting Culture. New York: Anthropological Papers of the American Museum of Natural History, 4. oogle Scholar. Levin, Maxime . and Dorian A. Sergeev (1965).

In Hunting the largest Animals: Native Whaling In the Western Arctic and Subarctic, ed. A. P. McCartney, 33–50. No. 3. Occasional Publication. University of Alberta, Edmonton: Canadian Circumpolar Institute. The Penetration of Iron into the Arctic: The First Find of an Iron Implement in a Site of the Old Bering Sea Culture. In The Archaeology and Geomorphology of Northern Asia, ed. H. N. Michael, 319–326.

Hunting the Largest Animals: Native Whaling in the Western Arctic and Subarctic .

Hunting the Largest Animals: Native Whaling in the Western Arctic and Subarctic (Occasional Publications Series) Jan 01, 1995. by Allen P. McCartney. Edmonton: Canadian Circumpolar Institute, University of Alberta (Occasiona. eter Whitridge. Beyond the pale: Inuit resistance to the Moravian reconstruction of northern Labrador.

Arctic Anthropology, founded in 1962 by Chester S. Chard, is an international journal devoted to the study of Old . Hunting the Largest Animals: Native Whaling in the Western Arctic and Subarctic by Allen P. McCartney (pp. 166-168). Chard, is an international journal devoted to the study of Old and New World northern cultures and peoples  . Elephants and Whales: Resources for Whom? by Milton M. R. Freeman, Urs P. Kreuter. Kreuter (pp. 168-171).

1995 Allen P. McCartney, Hunting the largest animals: native whaling in the western Arctic and . Labretifery occurred over a wide distribution from the Kuriles to southern British Columbia in the late prehistoric period. McCartney, Hunting the largest animals: native whaling in the western Arctic and subarctic, Canadian Circumpolar Institute, University of Alberta, p9. php?title labretifery&oldid 9458937". Categories: English lemmas. English uncountable nouns.

Captain Joseph Allen, hunted sperm whales on the Japanese ground . A large number of crewmen on American, British, and other countries vessels that participated in whaling in the 19th century created scrimshaw

Captain Joseph Allen, hunted sperm whales on the Japanese ground, midway between Japan and Hawaii. The previous year the first New England whalers visited the Sandwich (Hawaiian) Islands, and subsequently these islands were used to obtain fresh fruits, vegetables, and more crew, as well as to repair any damages sustained to the ship. A large number of crewmen on American, British, and other countries vessels that participated in whaling in the 19th century created scrimshaw. Scrimshaw is the practice of drawing on whale teeth or other forms of ivory with various tools, typically sailor's knives or other sharp instruments.

Offers a perspective of northern native societies that have depended upon whaling for centuries. Alaskan and Western Canadian Arctic coastal residents have pursued these animals as sources of food and fuel, but whaling also serves as a center for cultural traditional and spiritual sustenance. Papers by: Rober K. Harritt, Carol Zane Jolles, and Allen P. McCartney; Owen K. Mason and S. Craig Gerlach; Roger K. Harritt; Don E. Dumond; Linda Finn Yarborough; Allen P. McCartney; T. Max Friesen and Charles D. Arnold; James M. Savelle; David R. Yesner; Hans-Georg Bandi; Glenn W. Sheehan; Mary Ann Larson; Carol Zane Jolles; Stephen R. Braund and Elisabeth L. Moorehead; Howard W. Braham; Carol Zane Jolles; and Herbert O. Anungazuk.
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