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Worlds Before Adam: The Reconstruction of Geohistory in the Age of Reform ePub download

by Martin J. S. Rudwick

  • Author: Martin J. S. Rudwick
  • ISBN: 0226731294
  • ISBN13: 978-0226731292
  • ePub: 1521 kb | FB2: 1224 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Earth Sciences
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press; Reprint edition (May 15, 2010)
  • Pages: 648
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 130
  • Format: lrf mbr lit doc
Worlds Before Adam: The Reconstruction of Geohistory in the Age of Reform ePub download

By Martin J. S. Rudwick. Article in The Journal of Modern History 82(1):161-163 · March 2010 with 11 Reads. How we measure 'reads'.

By Martin J.

Here, Rudwick takes readers from the post-Napoleonic Restoration in Europe to the early years of Britain’s Victorian age .

Here, Rudwick takes readers from the post-Napoleonic Restoration in Europe to the early years of Britain’s Victorian age, chronicling the staggering discoveries geologists made during the period: the unearthing of the first dinosaur fossils, the glacial theory of the last ice age, and the meaning of igneous rocks, among others.

Worlds before Adam is an erudite and insightful sequel to Rudwick’s 2005 volume Bursting the Limits of Time. It narrates practical scientific work and theoretical speculation, which, in the quarter century between 1820 and 1845, saw geohistory refined by an increasingly sophisticated understanding of the causal mechanisms of geology. During this period, a closer integration of empirical study and theoretical conjecture allowed geologists to reconstruct a consistent outline of geohistory.

Martin J. Rudwick is professor emeritus of history at the University of California, San Diego and affiliated scholar in the . Rudwick is professor emeritus of history at the University of California, San Diego and affiliated scholar in the Department of the History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge. Anyway, it is shorter. Together they make a classic that anyone who wants to understand the mingled histories of geology and paleontology in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries should read. One person found this helpful.

Ultimately, Rudwick reveals geology to be the first of the sciences to investigate the historical dimension of nature, a model that Charles Darwin used in developing his evolutionary theory

He is the author of Bursting the Limits of Time,The Meaning of Fossils, The Great Devonian Controversy, Scenes from Deep Time, and Georges Cuvier, all published by the University of Chicago Press. He was awarded the Sarton Medal of the History of Science Society in 2007.

Books : WORLDS BEFORE ADAM 8211 THE RECONSTR. In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, scientists reconstructed the immensely long history of the earth-and the relatively recent arrival of human life. The geologists of the period, many of whom were devout believers, agreed about this vast timescale.

You may be interested in. Worlds Before Adam: The Reconstruction of. . Worlds Before Adam: The Reconstruction of Geohistory in the Age of Reform. Martin J. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Advanced Paper Aircraft Construction.

In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, scientists reconstructed the immensely long history of the earth—and the relatively recent arrival of human life. The geologists of the period, many of whom were devout believers, agreed about this vast timescale. But despite this apparent harmony between geology and Genesis, these scientists still debated a great many questions: Had the earth cooled from its origin as a fiery ball in space, or had it always been the same kind of place as it is now? Was prehuman life marked by mass extinctions, or had fauna and flora changed slowly over time?The first detailed account of the reconstruction of prehuman geohistory, Martin J. S. Rudwick’s Worlds Before Adam picks up where his celebrated Bursting the Limits of Time leaves off. Here, Rudwick takes readers from the post-Napoleonic Restoration in Europe to the early years of Britain’s Victorian age, chronicling the staggering discoveries geologists made during the period: the unearthing of the first dinosaur fossils, the glacial theory of the last ice age, and the meaning of igneous rocks, among others. Ultimately, Rudwick reveals geology to be the first of the sciences to investigate the historical dimension of nature, a model that Charles Darwin used in developing his evolutionary theory.Featuring an international cast of colorful characters, with Georges Cuvier and Charles Lyell playing major roles and Darwin appearing as a young geologist, Worlds Before Adam is a worthy successor to Rudwick’s magisterial first volume. Completing the highly readable narrative of one of the most momentous changes in human understanding of our place in the natural world, Worlds Before Adam is a capstone to the career of one of the world’s leading historians of science.
Paxondano
Although the previous volume of this series (Bursting the Limits of Time) is full of excellent research, I thought it failed to bring the subject alive as Rudwick's earlier The Meaning of Fossils had. Worlds Before Adam is livelier, perhaps because it deals more with paleontology, Rudwick's profession, than the first volume, perhaps because it was edited a bit more energetically. (Anyway, it is shorter.) Together they make a classic that anyone who wants to understand the mingled histories of geology and paleontology in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries should read.
Jonide
`Bursting the Limits of Time' & 'Worlds Before Adam' by Martin J. S. Rudwick

In 1793 savant Jean-Andre de Luc stated "I do not believe I should be accused of longueur, by those who recognize that I am here tracing - from its monuments - the fundamental basis of the ancient history of Men, since it concerns their habitation". Author Martin Rudwick comments that "after a good start [de Luc] soon relapsed into his customary verbosity". In fairness after these 708 and 614 page tomes, Rudwick is in no position to thus accuse anyone. De Luc went on to discuss erratic boulders perched high on hills and across plains; lakes acting as natural `chronometers' as they had not yet been silted up by incoming sediment; and subterranean caverns which opened to contain the water required to reduce sea level at various geological times; and so on.

Books like these are rare. For those who want an escape from professional work, family, politics, or the stock exchange these are the ticket. An escape to the intellectual world of 1789 - 1823 and 1820 - 1845 respectively. Absorbed in the historical geological debate with the `savants' of the day we can feel, with the benefit of hindsight, either how hopelessly wrong or spectacularly correct the intellectual speculation can be about honest observations.

These are not books to be read rapidly like a novel. They are an escape to ponder 10 - 15 pages at a time whenever possible, hoping never to come to the end. They allow the reader to live the discovery of geology. We can wonder how and why the author devoted so much time to produce the two tomes. But it was not in vain. Often scientists who achieve breakthroughs personally engender a school of acolytes who develop the new field further.The reason is that learning from a master shows how a discovery was made not just what the discovery was. Perhaps Rudwick's books do this for geology - we understand how the field developed not just the bare results.
Linn
This is a truly facinating guide through the development of geologic concepts during the period from the Napoleanic Wars to the early 1840s. It is illustrated with many well-reproduced figures from the period covered. I would recommend it heartily to others like me who love geology but have never had the opportunity to study it, and I would think it would provide fascinating insight for the professional geologist who wants to learn more about the early days of his or her profession.
It follows naturally from the author's "Bursting the Limits of Time," which I think one should read before this. The book is beautiful. I cannot believe the publisher is making any money at the sales price.
Nicanagy
This volume is the second volume in a two-volume set, the first being the author's "Bursting the Limits of Time" which I have reviewed separately. Like the other it is physically heavy and makes for fairly slow, but worthwhile, reading.

This volume continues the story through the first half of the 19th century when the field of geology attained a certain degree of maturity. While I still found the story fascinating, this volume tended to be unnecessarily repetitive, at least partly because the author's habit of recapping a chapter caused the shorter chapters in this volume to have a larger fraction of recaps (called "conclusions"). It would have been an easier and shorter read if some of the repetition were omitted.

Nevertheless, I enjoyed it a lot and particularly enjoyed the environment which the field of geology developed which turned out to be the setting for Darwin a few years later. (Darwin does appear in the book, as a geologist!) Definitely recommended; just not as good as the first volume.
Styphe
I am rating this book for its physical, not intellectual, properties. Owning a hardbound copy of Rudwick's "Bursting the limits of time", I decided to purchase a hardbound copy of "Worlds before Adam", expecting (silly me) to get a comparable quality book since it is a continuation of the first book. In "Bursting..." the pages are sewn, in "Worlds..." they aren't. "Bursting..." has a dust jacket over a fairly thick cardboard cover. "Worlds..." has no dust jacket, the 'cover' being imprinted on scratchable, flimsier cardboard. Although similar in number of pages "Bursting..." is heftier and noticeably thicker than "Worlds...". Shame on University of Chicago Press for such a downgrade in midstream.
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