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Hard and Soft Acids and Bases (Benchmark Papers in Inorganic Chemistry Series) ePub download

by Ralph G. Pearson

  • Author: Ralph G. Pearson
  • ISBN: 087933021X
  • ISBN13: 978-0879330217
  • ePub: 1268 kb | FB2: 1138 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Chemistry
  • Publisher: Van Nostrand Reinhold; Second Printing edition (September 1, 1973)
  • Pages: 480
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 240
  • Format: docx mobi lit azw
Hard and Soft Acids and Bases (Benchmark Papers in Inorganic Chemistry Series) ePub download

Hard and Soft Acids and Bases (HSAB) Theory is a qualitative concept introduced by Ralph Pearson to explain the stability of metal complexes and the mechanisms of their reactions.

Hard and Soft Acids and Bases (HSAB) Theory is a qualitative concept introduced by Ralph Pearson to explain the stability of metal complexes and the mechanisms of their reactions. However it is possible to quantify this concept based on Klopman's FMO analysis using interactions between HOMO and LUMO. Hard Lewis acids are characterized by small ionic radii, high positive charge, strongly solvated, empty orbitals in the valence shell and with high energy LUMOs.

Acid–base concepts provide one of the most important and enduring foundations for correlating chemical reactivity. Pearson RG (ed) (1973) Hard and soft acids and bases, Benchmark papers in inorganic chemistry. Dowden/Hutchinson and Ross, Stroudsburg. 480 ppGoogle Scholar. Schindler PW (1981) Surface complexes at oxide-water interfaces. In: Anderson MA, Rubin AJ (eds) Adsorption of inorganics at solid–liquid interfaces. Ann Arbor Science, Ann Arbor, pp 1–49Google Scholar. Stumm W (1992) Chemistry of the solid-water Interface.

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HSAB concept is an initialism for "hard and soft (Lewis) acids and bases". Also known as the Pearson acid-base concept, HSAB is widely used in chemistry for explaining stability of compounds, reaction mechanisms and pathways

HSAB concept is an initialism for "hard and soft (Lewis) acids and bases". Also known as the Pearson acid-base concept, HSAB is widely used in chemistry for explaining stability of compounds, reaction mechanisms and pathways. It assigns the terms 'hard' or 'soft', and 'acid' or 'base' to chemical species. Hard' applies to species which are small, have high charge states (the charge criterion applies mainly to acids, to a lesser extent to bases), and are weakly polarizable.

Ralph Pearson introduced the Hard Soft Acid Base (HSAB) .

Ralph Pearson introduced the Hard Soft Acid Base (HSAB) principle in the early nineteen sixties, and in doing so attempted to unify inorganic and organic reaction chemistry. The impact of the new idea was immediate, however, over the years the HSAB principle has rather fallen by the wayside while other approaches developed at the same time, such as frontier molecular orbital (FMO) theory and molecular mechanics, have flourished.

G. Pearson, Hard and Soft Acids and Bases, Benchmark Papers in Inorganic Chemistry, Pennsylvania, Chapter 1,1980. June 2009 · Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics.

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Ralph Gottfrid Pearson (born January 12, 1919, Chicago) is a physical inorganic chemist best known for the development of the concept of hard and soft acids and bases (HSAB). in physical chemistry in 1943 from Northwestern University, and taught chemistry at Northwestern faculty from 1946 until 1976, when he moved to University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB).

Acids and bases are important for a number reasons in inorganic chemistry. These acids are sufficiently strong in anhydrous media that they can protonate olefins and alcohols to produce carbocations. Carbocations are key intermediates in the transformations of hydrocarbons.

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