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Extinct Birds ePub download

by Errol Fuller

  • Author: Errol Fuller
  • ISBN: 0670817872
  • ISBN13: 978-0670817870
  • ePub: 1884 kb | FB2: 1450 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Biological Sciences
  • Publisher: Viking/Rainbird; First Edition edition (1987)
  • Pages: 256
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 636
  • Format: docx rtf lrf mbr
Extinct Birds ePub download

Keulemans, a couple (great auk and Himalayan mountain quail) by Edward Lear.

Like Errol Fuller's previous books, Extinct Birds (Cornell University Press) is big, colorful, and magnificently laid out. Of course it is sad; one cannot look at these pages and read about the birds that we will never see again, without a sense of loss.

We learn from an early age that nothing is quite so dead as a dodo. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. We learn from an early age that nothing is quite so dead as a dodo.

Extinct Birds is a book by Walter Rothschild which covers globally extinct and rare birds, as well as hypothetical extinct species which include bird taxa whose existence is based only on written or oral reports or on paintings

Extinct Birds is a book by Walter Rothschild which covers globally extinct and rare birds, as well as hypothetical extinct species which include bird taxa whose existence is based only on written or oral reports or on paintings.

236 P. Extinct Birds is an absorbing study of the world's recently extinct bird species, the first complete survey since Walter Rothschild's classic work of 1907. Drawing together many strands of evidence and supposition, Errol Fuller succeeds in combining scientific accuracy with a lively and readable style. Since 1600 some 75 bird species have become extinct, many since Rothschild wrote his book.

Errol Fuller is an acclaimed artist and writer, and a world authority on bird and animal extinction. Princeton University Press.

The tragedy of extinct birds. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 10 years ago. "Extinct Birds" is a kind of encyclopaedia about all or most birds known to have gone extinct for the past 400 years. It's lavishly illustrated, with reproductions of paintings or illustrations from old books on natural history.

Extinct Birds (complete title: Extinct birds Errol Fuller's gloriously illustrated Extinct Birds provides details of the natural history.

Extinct Birds (complete title: Extinct birds. Errol Fuller's gloriously illustrated Extinct Birds provides details of the natural history.

About Extinct Birds - Ornithologists estimate that there have been 150,000 avian . If that figure, based on incomplete evidence, is correct, writes Errol Fuller, then nearly 94 percent of those species have gone extinct over time.

About Extinct Birds - Ornithologists estimate that there have been 150,000 avian species since birds first appeared millions of years ago. If that fi. Most have done so through more or less natural causes-through disease, say, or widespread climatic change. Ornithologists estimate that there have been 150,000 avian species since birds first appeared millions of years ago.

. with dustjacket, 1987 clean bright copy
Marg
Beautiful book with lots of gorgeous illustrations and well written, interesting information about the various birds.
Heraly
Got it dirt cheap price, one of my hobbies is birdwatching and studying extinct bird species so got the book, I just wish it had more illustrations, but overall is a good read, excellent value, addition to my library.
Kage
I am so glad to be able to get this book. The illustrations are gorgeous, and the text is fascinating and spell-binding.
Fani
Received the book as stated in a timely way. Thanks. Came in good condition and as expected. Worthwhile read and unique book.
Uanabimo
Very good book. Comprehensive good reference. lots of info on each species.well documented pictures are well done and show the history of each one
Jugami
The two most basic and obvious descriptions of this book only highlights the poignancy of the subject of EXTINCT BIRDS. To say that the book is large (nearly 400 pages) implies that there are a lot of birds that are no longer with us. Telling you it's beautifully illustrated (which it is, with nearly every page including a painting, photograph, or sketch, many in full color) only shows that we've lost a wide variety of colorful species. The book is also thoroughly researched and well organized with a logical arrangement of the birds in their main groupings.
In the introduction Fuller mentions Jerdon's Courser and the Four-colored flowerpecker, two species previously thought extinct (the flowerpecker since 1900). Both have since been rediscovered. This illustrates one of the dramatic changes in recent times with regard to the whole subject of extinction. Rediscovery is news and extinction is big business. It long ago shrugged off it's dry and dusty, stuffed-exhibits-in-a-museum image, and is now firmly embedded in popular culture and is the subject of bestsellers and box-office hits. This is especially true for birds and dinosaurs. Fuller says as much and gives a nod to the huge role JURASSIC PARK played in this. The story of the Coelacanth is even more remarkable than the rediscovery, after 100 years, of a small flowerpecking bird in a stand of forests on the Phillipine island of Cebu. Nonetheless we'll probably have a long wait before we see a prehistoric fish starring in a movie. The Coelacanth does have its own book though. Its rediscovery in 1938 after being gone for 400 million years is the subject of Samantha Weinberg's A FISH CAUGHT IN TIME. Fuller acknowledges another recent trend which is heightening interest in extinction - the recent scientific work using DNA technology - and its hint that we may be able to restore species in the not too distant future.
As part of useful background information Fuller talks about the special role of islands in the extinction process. There is much that is known about the peculiar sensitivity of these ecosystems. There is a correlation between islands and high rates of extinct, and threatened but still extant, bird species. Fuller makes referrence to David Quammen's appropriately titled book THE SONG OF THE DODO which explores the whole subject of island biogeography. Small fragile ecosystems, loss of habitat (especially forest cover), the impact of agriculture and other man-made environments, introduced species and competition; all of these are subjects scientists are very familiar with and whose impact on bird extinction has been studied.
Where the recent popular interest in extinction becomes slightly problematic for professionals is that we all want to know what's happening, but quantifying bird extinctions and arriving at loss rates still remains an inexact science. This book covers the 85 bird species that are known to have gone extinct since 1600. There is immediately a problem with this simple statement. "Known" is very subjective and the starting year of 1600 is artificial. Fuller explains: "The year 1600 heralds a period during which relatively reliable records have accumulated; before this time the records are sparse and, where they do exist, it is usually difficult to know what to make of them." As for the difficulty of statistical methods in estimating loss rates, consider the following. For ease of calculation use the number of species lost as 80 and years at 400 (1600 to 2000). This works out to 5, which a dishonest person could report as saying that on average over the last 400 years we have been losing bird species at the rate of 5 per year! ... That works out to 2000 extinct species but we know that the correct figure is 85, so it simply means that for many years there were no extinctions. What we do know is that the rate of extinction in recent years has been increasing. The most commonly accepted bird extinction rate today is Colombia University's Center for Environmental Research and Conservations' figure of 0.01 percent or one species per year. This little exercise illustrates the statistical chicanery employed by THE SKEPTICAL ENVIRONMENTALIST with his estimate of the overall extinction rate at "0.7 percent over the next 50 years". This works out to 0.014 percent which is barely higher than the most conservative estimate for bird extinctions alone!
Statistics aside, and regardless of whether you accept that there will be an estimated 1200 more bird species extinct in the next 100 years there are a couple of things that are certain. The next edition of this book will be as beautiful as this one and depending on how soon it's published it will be bigger. How much larger and by how many species remians the sad unknown.
superstar
This is a marvellous collector's book and fit for any coffee table. Lavishly illustrated, well bound with detailed and often poignant descriptions. It is also reasonably scholarly with lot of quotes and references to follow up leads. Each bird is given a separate "portrait" and chapter.
I think the second edition has not evolved too much from the first. Pehaps a few maps and a greater sense of urgency in an overview chapter could have made this book more than just a collector's book. It could have lists of organisations you can join to help prevent extinctions and notes about endemic bird areas - in the style of Roger and Petersen.
This remains an important reference though its traditional format has obviously not helped sales as I got mine for a fraction of the published cost.
An extraordinarily carefully researched, poetically worded, and gloriously illustrated treatment of a distressingly ordinary (in the sense of common) topic. Deeply moving while also instructive.
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