» » Field Guide to the Songbirds of South America: The Passerines (Mildred Wyatt-Wold Series in Ornithology)

Field Guide to the Songbirds of South America: The Passerines (Mildred Wyatt-Wold Series in Ornithology) ePub download

by Guy Tudor,Robert S. Ridgely

  • Author: Guy Tudor,Robert S. Ridgely
  • ISBN: 0292717482
  • ISBN13: 978-0292717480
  • ePub: 1463 kb | FB2: 1541 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Biological Sciences
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press; 1st Edition edition (June 1, 2009)
  • Pages: 760
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 832
  • Format: mobi docx lrf lrf
Field Guide to the Songbirds of South America: The Passerines (Mildred Wyatt-Wold Series in Ornithology) ePub download

Series: Mildred Wyatt-Wold Series in Ornithology In short, for anyone planning a birding trip to South America, this book is a must have! Hopefully these two authors are currently hard a. .

Series: Mildred Wyatt-Wold Series in Ornithology. II Suboscine Passerines by Ridgely/Guy, 1994 4) A Guide to the Birds of South America by de Schauensee, 1970 5) South American Land Birds: A Photographic Aid to Identification by Dunning, 1987 6) Species of Birds of South America, The by de Schauensee, 1966. 24 people found this helpful. In short, for anyone planning a birding trip to South America, this book is a must have! Hopefully these two authors are currently hard at work on their long-promised guide to the non-passerines.

Drawn from The Birds of South America: The Oscine Passerines and The Birds of.Series: Mildred Wyatt-Wold Endowment in Ornithology.

Series: Mildred Wyatt-Wold Endowment in Ornithology.

160 additional color illustrations of subspecies and females Extensively updated color range maps for all of the species in the field guide, prepared by Robert S. Ridgely with technical assistance from Maria Allen and Terry Clarke, appear opposite the plates for each bird family Robert .

Request PDF On Jan 1, 2010, Robert B. Payne and others published FIELD GUIDE TO THE SONGBIRDS OF SOUTH .

The Gran Chaco is situated at the distributional limits of the ranges of both species South America and the Chaco is the northern limit, while it is the southern limit for C. carbonaria which has a distribution that extends significantly to the North.

Part of the Mildred Wyatt-Wold Series in Ornithology Series). by Guy Tudor and Robert S. Ridgely.

With the publication of the landmark volumes The Birds of South America: The Oscine Passerines and The Birds of South America: The Suboscine Passerines, Robert S. Ridgely and Guy Tudor established themselves as the leading authorities on the songbirds of South America.

Robert S. Ridgely Guy Tudor. 9780292717480 Hardcover.

Автор: Guy Tudor & Robert S. Ridgely Название: Field Guide to the Birds of South America: Passerines ISBN . Описание: This is a major identification guide covering all of South America& passerines (songbirds).

Описание: This is a major identification guide covering all of South America& passerines (songbirds). Covers around 2000 species, with most of them illustrated and all mapped.

This is a single-volume guide to South American passerines, based on a two-volume work first published in 1989 and . There are still large areas of South America without a comprehensive field guide, so this book will become essential for anyone birding in these areas (.

This is a single-volume guide to South American passerines, based on a two-volume work first published in 1989 and 1994. Brazil, Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay). Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC ISBN: 9781408113424 Number of pages: 760 Weight: 1296 g Dimensions: 225 x 150 x 44 mm.

There are still large areas of South America without a comprehensive field guide, so this book will . Other books in this series. extremely useful addition to the 'field guides' to South American birds' Birding World (2009) show more.

There are still large areas of South America without a comprehensive field guide, so this book will become essential for anyone birding in these areas (. Format Paperback 760 pages. Bob Ridgely is a leading authority on South American birds.

With the publication of the landmark volumes The Birds of South America: The Oscine Passerines and The Birds of South America: The Suboscine Passerines, Robert S. Ridgely and Guy Tudor established themselves as the leading authorities on the songbirds of South America. Reviewers hailed the volumes as the essential reference works for professional ornithologists and avocational birders alike, and they remain the only volumes that provide full scientific coverage of the continent's passerines.

Recognizing the need for a more compact guide that birders can take into the field, Ridgely and Tudor have now extracted and updated the essential identification information from The Birds of South America to create the Field Guide to the Songbirds of South America. This definitive guide is filled with indispensable features:

121 color plates that present Guy Tudor's magnificently detailed paintings of more than 1,500 species of songbirds, including more than 400 that were not illustrated in BOSA160 additional color illustrations of subspecies and femalesExtensively updated color range maps for all of the species in the field guide, prepared by Robert S. Ridgely with technical assistance from Maria Allen and Terry Clarke, appear opposite the plates for each bird familyRobert S. Ridgely's authoritative accounts of nearly 2,000 species that cover each bird's abundance, habitat, and range; elevational preference; taxonomic or nomenclatural changes; plumage description; general behavior and voice; and range beyond South America, if applicable
Via
THE BASICS: softcover, 1,981 species described, 1,500+ species illustrated in 121 excellent color plates, detailed and customized range maps for 1,800+ species, paragraph of text focuses on description, identification, voice, and distribution

THE REVIEW: It was hard to put this book down after receiving it in the mail. It's an impressive merger of the authors' two prior books into a single volume of plates and identification material. The size and weight of this book is well above the limits for a "field guide" and the layout of the material does not lend itself to quick field use. However, that will not prevent me from taking it with me on my next trip - especially if multiple regions are involved.

The 121 plates - taken from the prior books along with another 500+ new illustrations - are superbly done. Plumage variations are shown for the more distinct races and usually for the gender differences. Of the 1,981 birds described in the text, just over 1,500 are illustrated in the plates. And, about 1,800 are accompanied with a range map. These maps include country and state boundaries along with major rivers, which help to bring greater detail to the birds' ranges. These maps also display migrational movements with a nice touch of using two different colors to denote if the bird is austral or boreal in origin.

As noted above, not all species are illustrated, which means you will still need a regional guide for the other 500 or so birds. As a bit of irony, I had to chuckle at the Elusive Antpitta. Antpittas are notorious enough for being hard to find in the field. Well, within this book the Elusive Antpitta goes one step further - it's not illustrated, making it even more elusive. That's just not fair. Also, of the 40 species of the smaller tapaculos, only 18 are shown in the plates, although a map is supplied for each. I guess that is in keeping with their frustrating skill at remaining hidden, too.

A few other quirks with the plates are particular missing species or plumages. For example, only the female of the One-colored Becard is shown while only the male of the Cinereous Becard is included. Other more common species such as the Scaly-throated Foliage-Gleaner is not illustrated while some rarer birds like the Cherry-throated Tanager is. Also, the numbering of the birds is sometimes jumbled on the plate, making you search around for "#6". But, these notes are trivial in comparison to the massive amount of excellent work that is present.

Regarding the layout of the book, the plates and maps are together in the beginning third of the book. Each bird's map is on the left while the plate is on the right. Many of the birds with smaller ranges are combined onto one map. There is zero text with these plates other than the English and scientific names. The text that goes with these birds creates the last two-thirds of the book.

The text for each bird consists of a single paragraph that focuses almost entirely on description, identification, similar species, and behavioral notes that can aid with identification. Additional notes are given for distribution, habitat, and voice. The information offers excellent detail and accounts for the racial variations across the bird's range.

This book is probably good enough to cause many birders to buy two; but, for nefarious reasons. That is to cut up the second copy and to spiral-bind the plates/maps together into a smaller, more portable book. Now, I'm eagerly awaiting the future volume on non-passerines. -- (written by Jack, shown with sample pages at Avian Review, July 2009)

I've listed several related books below...
1) Birds of South America: Non-Passerines: Rheas to Woodpeckers by Erize/Mata/Rumboll, 2006
2) Birds of South America: Vol. 1 Oscine Passerines by Ridgely/Guy, 1989
3) Birds of South America: Vol. II Suboscine Passerines by Ridgely/Guy, 1994
4) A Guide to the Birds of South America by de Schauensee, 1970
5) South American Land Birds: A Photographic Aid to Identification by Dunning, 1987
6) Species of Birds of South America, The by de Schauensee, 1966
Vonalij
I'd challenge the inclusion of "field guide" in the title. This volume is indeed more compact that the combined two authoritative volumes of The Birds of South America series by the same authors covering the same assemblage of birds (the passerines), and it does include illustrations of 406 more species than are found in those two volumes. The exquisite illustrations (by Guy Tudor) are predominantly those from the two larger volumes. Facing each plate of illustrations is a page displaying the corresponding range maps, and after the plates the species accounts devote one paragraph of concise information to each species (and in most instances those paragraphs are rich in content, usually distilled from the more complete species accounts found in the larger volumes).

But I can't imagine a birder opting to add to an already presumably bulging field pouch a 750-page "field guide" devoted only the passerines (but devoted to all the passerines in a large and diverse continent). I submit that this is indeed a reference work to be consulted before and after time in the field, and as such I think birders will find it of considerable value.
Jia
I agree with everyone here. This book is a fantastic resource, much awaited by those of us who owned the original two hardcovers. It is still pretty big in this revised paperback edition, but you will definitely want to take it along on your next South American birding trip, even if it waits for you back in the lodge while you are out in the field each day.

I have to say -- Guy Tudor's illustrations are the most beautiful I have ever seen in any neotropical field guide, including the guides he has done for Colombia and Venezuela. Between trips, you will just want to sit for hours in your favorite easy chair, enjoying this book and studying for future trips. As for accuracy -- several birds on my last trip to NE Peru were only identifiable with the use of this guide. In a few cases, even the very good Princeton University Press "Birds of Peru" came up short. Between Tudor's fine illustrations and Ridgely's concise commentaries, these difficult IDs were nailed.

In short, for anyone planning a birding trip to South America, this book is a must have! Hopefully these two authors are currently hard at work on their long-promised guide to the non-passerines. In the meantime, the existing Princeton checklist for the Non-Passerines of S.A. is really not that bad.
Otrytrerl
We bird watchers should be grateful to Ridgely and Tudor for making this book... beautifully pictured species and nice content. One can feel how much these guys appreciate those animals. Along with Avifauna Brasileira by T. Sigrist, they are the best guides of SA and Brazilian birds I have ever read. I am just excited to have in hands the next volumes 3 and 4 ! Some suggestions to next edition to be included are:
a. separate atlas and text into 2 tomes for it's more practical to handle with in the field.
b. definitely important to add a list of bird names in Brazilian portuguese! At least put them at the side of American names.
c. include a "book marker" with the mark color legends, etc. It is nice to mark pages and to quick find yourself in the many colors in the maps.
Sharpbrew
I recently traveled to Brazil for a conference and some birding-oriented travel, and waffled between purchasing this book (accompanied by Erize et al.'s non-passerine Birds of South America) or the single-volume Birds of Brazil by Ber van Perlo. At the advice of a few birder friends who had recently spent time in Brazil, I chose Ridgely and Tudor - and I am so glad that I did! Most other people I birded with had van Perlo's book, so I was able to compare the plates side-by-side. Ridgely and Tudor was superior, often by orders of magnitude, in every single case - better, more accurate drawings; more accurate color rendition; more updated and precise range information; and more in-depth natural-history descriptions. This is the book to buy, no doubt about it!
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