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Night of the Grizzlies ePub download

by Jack Olsen

  • Author: Jack Olsen
  • ISBN: 0943972485
  • ISBN13: 978-0943972480
  • ePub: 1675 kb | FB2: 1267 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Biological Sciences
  • Publisher: Homestead Pub; unknown edition (June 1, 1996)
  • Pages: 221
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 663
  • Format: lit lrf rtf doc
Night of the Grizzlies ePub download

Cover design by Vixer Ching.

Cover design by Vixer Ching. The answer was simple, of course: too many humans infringing on bear habitat, and poor management practices by the National Park Service. But that hasn’t kept grizzlies from killing again, and again. I hope this work explains why. -Jack Olsen, Spring 1996.

Night of the Grizzlies" is a great tale and although written by Olsen nearly 45 years ago, is only slightly outdated. The first time I read a book, I force myself to read the prologue. It's primarily a very in-depth description of the landscape, plants and animals that you find in Glacier National Park, with a little bit of history of human/grizzly bear interaction in the Park's history e.

Night of the Grizzlies (1969) is a book by Jack Olsen which details events surrounding the night of August 13, 1967, when two young women were separately attacked and killed in Glacier National Park, Montana, by grizzly bears. Both women, Julie Helgeson, 19, of Albert Lea, Minnesota, and Michele Koons, 19, of San Diego, California, died of their injuries. The night of August 12–13 was marked by lightning, which led some to speculate the bears were agitated by the stormy weather.

On some of these lower mountains and hills along the edges of the great park, stark rows of blackened tamaracks reach above the green treeline of the uppermost ridges.

On some of these lower mountains and hills along the edges of the great park, stark rows of blackened tamaracks reach above the green treeline of the uppermost ridges ades ago, they stand on their dead roots in the highest winds and refuse to fall, and somehow they resemble the charred and shattered rows of barbed-wire pickets that remained on the bloodied ridges of World War I. Forest fires, like wars, leave behind the artifacts of futility and uselessness. Scattered about on the heavily wooded.

Night of the Grizzlies book.

For more than half a century, grizzly bears roamed free in the national parks without causing a human fatality. Books related to Night of the Grizzlies.

The popular sport that summer was to lure the bears with spotlights and leftover scraps - in hopes of providing the tourists with a show, a close look at the great "teddy bears.

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Night of the Grizzlies (1969) is a book by Jack Olsen which details events surrounding the night of August 13, 1967, when two young women were separately attacked in Glacier National Park, Montana, by grizzly bears. This article is about the book, for the unrelated 1966 movie, see The Night of the Grizzly. Night of the Grizzlies.

Jack Olsen's true account, traces the causes of the tragic night in August 1967 when two separate and unrelated campers, a distance apart, were savagely mangled and killed by enraged bears.
Best West
It's the definitive work on what happened one August night in 1967 in Glacier National Park, Montana. How and why two different grizzly bear attacks occurred (resulting in two fatalities) on the same night is what author Jack Olsen carefully and thoughtfully describes in "Night of the Grizzlies."

I had heard this story before but until this month, never knew the details. My memory was jogged and inspired by reading "Speaking of Bears," by Rachel Mazur. Olsen does a thorough job establishing the background and history of Glacier National Park and its manifold but patently unsuccessful bear management techniques. There was never an overarching or abiding bear management strategy. National Park Service management tactics that were recommended if not required were not followed. Those that were tried were haphazard and erratic. That one or more grizzly attacks would ultimately occur was virtually inevitable. That two attacks and deaths occurred on the same night in the same park could not have been predicted, an amazing coincidence.

The engaged reader will confidently conclude that grizzly bear attacks in Glacier NP could have occurred at any time and were in a very real sense, overdue.

"Night of the Grizzlies" is a great tale and although written by Olsen nearly 45 years ago, is only slightly outdated. In "Speaking of Bears," which just came out, Rachel Mazur delves into the bear management techniques that have developed over the last fifty years, strategies that include closing park dumps, hauling out trash, equipment advances such as the development of bear boxes for food storage and bear-proof trash receptacles in the front country, along with development and required use of lightweight, bear-proof food canisters in the back country.
Keath
I'm glad I read this book. It gave me a better understanding of what happened back than. I was going to high school in Montana when this happened and didn't know all the facts. I've always feared Grissley bears. But the author is not my favorite. He throws in too many big words that's not necessary. And his sentences don't flow . when writing about Glacier Park, show us some pictures. Is it just laziness on the part of these authors, that they can't add pictures?
Dilkree
The first time I read a book, I force myself to read the prologue. It's primarily a very in-depth description of the landscape, plants and animals that you find in Glacier National Park, with a little bit of history of human/grizzly bear interaction in the Park's history. That last part is useful, but unless you enjoy 29 pages of d...e...s...c...r...i...p...t...i...o...n, I suggest you skip to chapter one, on page 39. Okay. Now it's a very interesting book, that I sat up and read all in one night. It has eight pages of black & white photos, which give a better understanding of things. I've been to Glacier NP three times, but haven't been to Granite Park Chalet. What drew me most to this book is that the events it covers (if I'm not mistaken) are the reason that Glacier NP, Yellowstone NP and Grand Teton NP all changed their policies about letting bears eat from garbage dumps so the tourists could see them. This led bears to associate humans with food, and also brought them into close proximity with people, both of which are of course bad. This is a great read, with one minor eye roll being the author's archaic ideas about how males and females deal with a crisis.
Pringles
I read this twice and finally other family members have finished reading it. It is excellent in that the author has precise facts and details and allows the reader to enter the events chronologically. It is sad that even today, so many animal deaths result from human interference/intervention. Tragedy for both human and animal can easily be avoided by NOT feeding wildlife. This goes for bird feeders. Where we live in the Northeast, wild bears which are not Grizzlies are fast starting to lose their habitat. Looking for food they come to bird feeders. The home owners then complain to authorities that their children are in mortal danger etc. Common sense would go a long way - but it never does, and Fish and Game are left with no other alternative but to shoot dead the "offending" bears. So glad that our national parks are now stricter about enforcing the feeding of wildlife. Left to their own habitat and themselves, wildlife will leave us alone as they ask to be left in peace by us.
Yozshubei
I enjoyed this book. It's a fairly long and detailed book but I found it both informative and entertaining. It is some what dated. If recall correctly these bear attacks took place in 1967. Some things have changed, generally for the better in my thinking. It was very unfortunate that the park service was unofficially allowing the bears to come to a garbage dump along with crowds of people coming to see them. And warnings of a problem bear were really ignored by the park service. The result was the tragic death of 2 young women. I did find the closing comments by the author to be rather pessimistic and fortunately wrong. Anyway the author does a good job of describing the areas of the park. I felt I was there. It's history. It's a good read.
Nawenadet
I am not a fan of true crime books when people are involved -- people crimes are mostly committed for fundamentally evil reasons. However I am glad Olsen wrote many other true crime books (which I will never read) -- his skill at writing true crime is evident from the first page of this book, even if the "criminals" are grizzly bears who kill only because they are hungry with no evil intent. Olsen, in my opinion, is a very good storyteller and very even handed in assessing what happened: 0 to the Bears, a small amount to the victims (one of whom brought a dog, strictly against the law, and who had a Hershey bar in her pocket), and mostly to the National Park Service who set up a campsite in the middle of known grizzly bear habitat and failed to kill a known dangerous grizzly responsible for one of the deaths. Also I believe Olsens very sad conclusion about the ultimate fate of the grizzlies (total extermination).
Also note the very favorable review by the helicopter pilot who flew the rescue.
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