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Wildfire and Americans: How to Save Lives, Property, and Your Tax Dollars ePub download

by Roger G. Kennedy

  • Author: Roger G. Kennedy
  • ISBN: 0809065819
  • ISBN13: 978-0809065813
  • ePub: 1530 kb | FB2: 1746 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Biological Sciences
  • Publisher: Hill and Wang; 1st edition (June 27, 2006)
  • Pages: 352
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 901
  • Format: doc azw mobi mbr
Wildfire and Americans: How to Save Lives, Property, and Your Tax Dollars ePub download

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Mr Roger Kennedy seeks to stir his fellow citizens to action to save ‘a beautiful and lovely world’ at risk-and.

Kennedy's book, Wildfire and Americans, tells engrossing tales of the American experience with fire and makes an array of recommendations for dealing with fire threats, but his thinking applies to far more than burning brush or timber. Cornelia Dean, New York Times. Cornelia Dean The New York Times 2006-05-30). In this age of climate change, millions of Americans confront hazards of fire (and flood) for which they are ill-prepared. Roger Kennedy seeks to stir his fellow citizens to action to save ‘a beautiful and lovely world’ at risk-and thereby save themselves

Wildfire and Americans book.

Wildfire and Americans book.

Excerpted by permission.

I've been trying to understand government for a long time. This book was written to stimulate that discussion and to bring into it recognition of the profitable businesses that thrive on a culture that subsidizes settlement beyond safe limits, putting settlers and those who must rescue them at risk. Excerpted by permission.

Three years after Roger Kennedy retired as director of the National Park . Wildfire and Americans : How to Save Lives, Property, and Your Tax Dollars.

Three years after Roger Kennedy retired as director of the National Park Service, from his Santa Fe home he watched as the Cerro Grande Fire moved across th. .

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When human lives and property are under threat, state and local jurisdictions have an obligation to respond

When human lives and property are under threat, state and local jurisdictions have an obligation to respond. That costs a lot of money – this year has already proven to be the most expensive wildfire season in Montana since 1999, adjusted for inflation – and risks the lives of courageous firefighters. In the last half century, about one-fifth of the American people have moved into flame zones, insufficiently aware of the perils awaiting them and inadvertently testing the limits of nature’s tolerance, writes former National Park Service director Roger Kennedy in Wildfire and Americans: How to Save Lives, Property, and Your Tax Dollars.

Wildfire and Americans, how to save lives, property, and your tax dollars. This book restores Aaron Burr to his place as a central figure in the founding of the American Republic. Burr, Hamilton, and Jefferson: A Study in Character. Abolitionist, proto-feminist, friend to such Indian leaders as Joseph Brant, Burr was personally acquainted with a wider range of Americans, and of the American continent, than any other Founder except George Washington.

Wildfire and Americans: How to Save Lives, Property, and Your Tax Dollars. New York: Hill and Wang. Klick, J. and A. Tabarrok. Using Terror Alert Levels to Estimate the Effect of Police on Crime, The Journal of Law and Economics 48, 267–279. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Kunreuther, Howard and Geoffrey Heal. Murphy, Kevin . Andrei Shleifer and Robert W. Vishny.

Three years after Roger Kennedy retired as director of the National Park Service, from his Santa Fe home he watched as the Cerro Grande Fire moved across the Pajarito Plateau and into Los Alamos. Two hundred and thirty-five homes were destroyed, more than 45,000 acres of forest were burned, and the nation’s nuclear laboratories were threatened; even before the embers had died a blame game erupted. Kennedy’s career as a public servant, which encompasses appointments under five presidential administrations, convinced him that the tragedy would produce scapegoats and misinformation, and leave American lives at risk. That was unacceptable, even unforgivable.Wildfire and Americans is a passionate, deeply informed appeal that we acknowledge wildfire not as a fire problem but as a people problem. Americans are in the wrong places, damningly because they were encouraged to settle there. Politicians, scientists, and CEOs acting out of patriotism, hubris, and greed haveplaced their fellow countrymen in harm’s way. And now, with global warming, we inhabit a landscape that has become much more dangerous. Grounded in the conviction that we owe a duty to our environment and our fellow man, Wildfire and Americans is more than a depiction of policies gone terribly awry. It is a plea to acknowledge the mercy we owe nature and mankind.
Micelhorav
Thousands of people are moving unwarned into fire-prone areas every day - encouraged to do so by taxpayer subsidies (federally insured mortgages, roads, and insurance rates kept artificially low by regulators). Seven of the nine most fire-endangered states are also among those gaining the most in population. Meanwhile wildfires have doubled in frequency and in the size of areas burned. Meanwhile, Global Warning is likely to considerably expand the area of fire-prone forests.

Kennedy's primary focus is the 2000 Los Alamos area fire that arose from a controlled burn that took off with unexpected winds, leading to about 450 burned houses and underserved scapegoating of the officials in charge. A second example is the 2002 Rodeo-Chediski fire in N.E. Arizona that burned 460,000 acres. Even before the fire was out, the state's Governor Hull and Senator Kyl were blaming it on "environmental wackos" that had blocked logging that would have removed much of the fire load. Reality, however, is that two-thirds of the fire took place within already heavily logged areas on the Apache Reservation, the environmental lawsuit only involved about 5% of the total area burned, a major reason the fire grew so large was delays in initially fighting it, as well as poor utilization of available volunteered privately-owned equipment, and that the Forest Service had already concluded that "timber harvest . . . has increased fire severity more than any other recent human activity." (Kennedy was its former director.) Furthermore, only 17% of wildfires have started on federal land.

Kennedy recommends creating a "fire atlas" that would depict the fire danger in non-urban areas - it could be used by potential homeowners for more informed sitings, and by insurance agencies to more accurately reflect hazards.
Endieyab
The book is a real trailblazer on the subject of wildfire and its high costs in lives, property, and money. Kennedy frames his argument as an attempt to incite a "taxpayer revolt" on the subject, based on a long list of government policies, regulations, and subsidies encouraging people to build homes and businesses in areas with high risk of being destroyed by wildfires.

He cites the interest deduction for home mortgages, mortgage insurance, publicly financed infrastructure supporting residential developments, roads, real property taxes, and the high cost of suppressing wildfires now exceeding $2 billion annually. He notes in particular the rebuilding of homes in fire-prone areas, sometimes on multiple occasions, paid for by insurance whose costs are borne by "the rest of us."

Kennedy begins with the description of the May 2000 fire that began as a controlled burn at Bandelier National Monument. The National Park Service was wrongfully given much of the blame for a fire that ultimately burned some 18,000 acres, including 235 houses in Los Alamos, N.M. Los Alamos was a city of more than 12,000 people planned by scientists and engineers who gave every consideration to its security from spies, but none to the fact the city is "set in a firetrap."

Kennedy notes that: "In the last half century about one-fifth of the American people have moved into flame zones," ill informed of the natural risks and encouraged by governmental and business policies.

One of the author's principal recommendations involves the development of a National Flame Zone Atlas that "would show graduated degrees of danger, from low probability of big fires to high." Parts of such an Atlas exist now in disparate locations. An Atlas, revised regularly to reflect the dynamics of weather, vegetation, and population, could help reduce fire losses and steer public and private efforts to reduce flammable materials, such as the slash and debris from commercial logging and vegetation close to at-risk homes, businesses, and whole towns.

He identifies a fire-industrial complex, similar to the military-industrial complex to which President Eisenhower referred in his farewell address that has a self-serving set of reasons to maintain the status quo. Fighting wildfire is very big business these days! That industry will (and does) lobby against reforms that could reduce fire losses through changes in regulations affecting insurance, infrastructure investments, roads and highways, and land use planning. Kennedy asserts that: "Not an acre of land has changed hands in the last half century without a part of the price being paid by another taxpayer."
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