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Identification of Ancient Olive Oil Processing Methods Based on Olive Remains (BAR International Series) ePub download

by Peter Warnock

  • Author: Peter Warnock
  • ISBN: 1407300490
  • ISBN13: 978-1407300498
  • ePub: 1194 kb | FB2: 1888 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Agricultural Sciences
  • Publisher: British Archaeological Reports (May 15, 2007)
  • Pages: 116
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 439
  • Format: mbr rtf lrf docx
Identification of Ancient Olive Oil Processing Methods Based on Olive Remains (BAR International Series) ePub download

The ultimate goal is to see if the level or type of olive oil technology used at sites can be determined based on their olive remains.

The ultimate goal is to see if the level or type of olive oil technology used at sites can be determined based on their olive remains.

Social Science Books. British Archaeological Reports (Oxford) Ltd. Identification of Ancient Olive Oil Processing Methods Based on Olive Remains. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect.

Publication Year: 2007.

Identification of Ancient Olive Oil Processing Methods Based on Olive Remains.

Identification of ancient olive oil processing methods based on olive remains (BAR International series 1635). Olive oil in antiquity, Israel and neighbouring countries from the Neolithic to the Early Arab Period. 3-6. KISLEV, M. E. 1996

Identification of ancient olive oil processing methods based on olive remains (BAR International series 1635). 1996. The domestication of the olive tree, in D. Eitam & M. Heltzer (e. Olive oil in antiquity, Israel and neighbouring countries from the Neolithic to the Early Arab Period (History of the Ancient Near East Studies 7): 3-6. Padova: Sargon. On some African species of the genus olea and the original home of the cultivated olive-tree

Warnock P (2007) Identification of ancient olive oil processing methods based on the olive remains. BAR International Series S 1635. Archaeopress, OxfordGoogle Scholar.

Warnock P (2007) Identification of ancient olive oil processing methods based on the olive remains. Wilson DG (1984) The carbonization of weed seeds and their representation in macrofossil assemblages. In: van Zeist W, Casparie WA (eds) Plants and ancient man: studies in paleoethnobotany. Balkema, Rotterdam, pp 201–206Google Scholar. Winton AL, Winton KB (1932) Fruit of the olive family. The structure and composition of foods, vol 1. Cereals, starch, oil seeds, nuts, oils, forage plants.

Identification of Ancient Olive Oil Processing Methods Based on Olive Remains

Identification of Ancient Olive Oil Processing Methods Based on Olive Remains.

Bar international series; 1635.

Identification of ancient olive oil processing methods based on olive. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove IDENTIFICATION OF ANCIENT OLIVE OIL PROCESSING METHODS BASED ON OLIVE REMAINS. from your list? Identification of ancient olive oil processing methods based on olive remains. Published by ARCHAEOPRESS in OXFORD. Written in Undetermined. Bar international series; 1635.

Collection of IOC methods for chemical analysis of olive oils and olive-pomace oils. The latest version for each method is reported in this section, together with the corresponding decision. The previous versions of the methods are also reported below each method and decision, for historical information about the changes made over time.

Olive oil was used anciently for a variety of purposes, including lamp fuel . Amurca: Olive Oil Byproducts

Olive oil was used anciently for a variety of purposes, including lamp fuel, pharmaceutical ointment, and in rituals for anointing royalty, warriors, and other important people. Amurca: Olive Oil Byproducts. The leftover water from the milling process is called amurca in Latin and amorge in Greek, and it is a watery, bitter-tasting, smelly, liquid residue.

This research focuses on the complex issue of olive oil processing and the resulting technological changes associated with the olive oil industry during this industry's expansion from a small scale domestic to large-scale industrial technology during the Chalcolithic through Iron Ages (c. 4300-586 BC) in Syro-Palestine. The ultimate goal is to see if the level or type of olive oil technology used at sites can be determined based on their olive remains. However, before this could occur, the author prepares a methodology, the components of which include 1) an ethnographic study investigating how traditional oil pressing and processing affect olive remains, and the incorporation of those remains into the archaeological record, and 2) experimental studies to determine how different processing methods might affect olive remains and their incorporation into the archaeological record. The results from the experimental and ethnographic studies are then applied to archaeological remains from a Late Neolithic site to determine the possible type of processing technology. The type of processing indicated by the comparison of the experimental to the archaeological remains, crushing in a small basin, matches the olive oil processing artifacts and features found at the site. The methods used in this study can be applied to other paleoethnobotanical remains and technologies. Contents: Introduction; Origins and early history of the olive; Ethnographic research; Experimental research; Testing an archaeological sample; Olive oil, trade, and the city state; Conclusions.