» » Learn at Home, Grade 5

Learn at Home, Grade 5 ePub download

by American Education

  • Author: American Education
  • ISBN: 156189513X
  • ISBN13: 978-1561895137
  • ePub: 1943 kb | FB2: 1639 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Schools & Teaching
  • Publisher: Amer Education Pub (May 1, 1999)
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 584
  • Format: mbr doc mobi lrf
Learn at Home, Grade 5 ePub download

American education publishing-an open door to education! Make home education an adventure that you and your child will treasure for a lifetime! With the Learn at Home series, you can be confident that you are providing your child with a quality education

American education publishing-an open door to education! Make home education an adventure that you and your child will treasure for a lifetime! With the Learn at Home series, you can be confident that you are providing your child with a quality education. Designed by experts in elementary education, this valuable resource covers a full school year in six curriculum areas-everything you need to teach your child at home.

American education publishing-an open door to education! Make home educatio. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Learn at Home: Grade 5 as Want to Read

American education publishing-an open door to education! Make home educatio. Start by marking Learn at Home: Grade 5 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. File: PDF, . 7 MB. 2. Making the Science/Literature Connection (Grades K-2).

American education publishing-an open door to education! Make home education an adventure that you and your child will treasure for a lifetime!

American education publishing-an open door to education! Make home education an adventure that you and your child will treasure for a lifetime! With the Learn a. .Dimensions: . " x . " x 1. ". Age Range: 10 years and up. Grade Range: Kindergarten to Grade 6. You Might Also Enjoy.

American High School Grades and Education system. Basically, Students can learn more and more from high school in America as the education system of America is one of the best

American High School Grades and Education system. You may ask which grade does high school start in the US? Unlike others USA high school grade system also exists. Basically, Students can learn more and more from high school in America as the education system of America is one of the best. If you want to get higher Education as a smart way so, have to study Online Bachelor’s Degree. OK, hopefully, you have understood the American high school grades system and the entire educational system. In America, the Government gives much importance to the students’ education.

American education publishing-an open door to education! Make home education an adventure that .

American education publishing-an open door to education! Make home education an adventure that you and your child will treasure for a lifetime! With the Learn at Home series. Week 1 - No specific book: "Ask your child to read fairy tales this week. This could have been far, far more specific.

Home education was so common in America that most children knew how to read before they entered school. As Ralph Walker has pointed out, Children were often taught to read at home before they were subjected to the rigours of school

Home education was so common in America that most children knew how to read before they entered school. As Ralph Walker has pointed out, Children were often taught to read at home before they were subjected to the rigours of school Without ever spending a dime of tax money, or without ever consulting a host of bureaucrats, psychologists, and specialists, children in early America learned the basic academic skills of reading, writing, and ciphering necessary for getting al.

Education in the United States is provided in public, private, and home schools

Education in the United States is provided in public, private, and home schools. State governments set overall educational standards, often mandate standardized tests for K–12 public school systems and supervise, usually through a board of regents, state colleges, and universities.

American education publishing-an open door to education! . The social studies curriculum focuses on United States History, which is a 5th grade curriculum - at least it is in Texas. The science curriculum was not in line with what is taught in the sixth grade either. Overall, this book was a waste of money.

Health & Lifestyle Education. The best books on American Education. recommended by Michelle Rhee. The educationalist tells us about her experience as head of Washington DC’s public school system and explains how poorly performing children, and institutions, can be helped to improve. Horace Mann, the 19th century American education reformer, called public school the greatest discovery made by man. Before we hit the books, please tell me what you see as the purpose of public education.

AMERICAN EDUCATION PUBLISHING--AN OPEN DOOR TO EDUCATION! Make home education an adventure that you and your child will treasure for a lifetime! With the Learn at Home series, you can be confident that you are providing your child with a quality education. Designed by experts in elementary education, this valuable resource covers a full school year in six curriculum areas--everything you need to teach your child at home. This comprehensive resource includes:

36 weeks of lesson plans

Instruction in Reading, Language Skills, Spelling,

Math, Science and Social Studies

Additional activities supporting each week's lessons

Explanations of concepts and teaching approaches

Step-by-step instructions

Ready-to-use, reproducible activity sheets

Full-color illustrations

Answer keys The Learn at Home series--the essential guide to a quality home education. Begin the adventure!

Yramede
These have been SUPER helpful for me, I home-school my children and I am not going to say I'm great at it...However, I want the best education for my kids and I feel like this covers the basics and helps me achieve that goal. These series give you step by step instructions your curriculum is all planned out. You just have to execute it and add to it, if you want you could probably just stick to the books doing nothing else and still be giving your kids a great education. All in all LOVE these books!
Enditaling
Of course this is not a complete curriculum: but you would be amazed at how much curriculum help you can get from this 384-page book priced at under $10 (for a used copy)! I cannot TELL you how many times this book, with its level of detail and week-by-week ideas for lesson plans, has helped to calm me down and reassure me that 'it can be done.'

I do agree with reviewers who express the hope that the publisher will update and (for one thing) choose more readily available books for the reading list. I purchased about 3/4 of the books recommended, and they all seem like fine books, but yes it is true that most of them are not ones you will find at your public library -- and that is a drawback if you are on a tight budget like I am.

And with respect to math, there is NO WAY this curriculum is adequate all by itself. The Learn at Home math curriculum is a nice addition (to add a couple of extra worksheets each week) but you will definitely have to add a math curriculum (we are using Saxon Math 65 and Evan Moore's Daily Math Word Problem, with other word problem and standardized-test resources from the library).

Where Learn at Home is helping me the most is in Language Arts: the grammar program I picked (Winston Grammar) is very basic and only teaches parts of speech . . . Learn at Home's Language Arts lessons teach figures of speech, common areas of grammatical concern (like misusing the words 'good' and 'bad', when to use 'who' v. 'whom', etc.), and how to develop a 5th grader into a competent writer. The writing instruction is REALLY saving me because I purchased Susan Wise Bauer's 'Writing with Skill' to use with both sons, but it has turned out to be over the head of my 5th grader. I'm having to improvise a 5th grade writing curriculum at the last moment (i.e. the second week of school) and the Learn at Home lesson plans are helping tremendously (though, again, I am not going to rely on them solely).

An aside: don't let the hokey (cartoonish) look of the illustrations turn you off. They turned me off at first, and made me question whether the caliber of the assignments were really going to be up to a 5th grade standard. We're doing more rigorous science than what I find in this book -- and some of the hokiest illustrations are on science worksheets -- but the content of the curriculum ideas ARE solid, even for science, despite the bad artwork.

2017 Update:

I want to follow up and stress that the reading component of Learn at Home Grade 5 needs to be completely re-written: not only are many of the books not in the library, but there are much better books available. Here is a list of the books required, whether I recommend them (YES or NO) and suggestions for alternative 5th grade books.

Week 1 - No specific book: "Ask your child to read fairy tales this week." (This could have been far, far more specific.) How about Native American tales, to fit with the social studies’ theme of ‘discovery of America’?

Week 2 – Paul Goble, The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses: NO. This picture book is idiotic (it's about a Native American girl who loves horses so much that she turns into one). Try one by Joseph Bruchac who, unlike Paul Goble, is really Native American.

Weeks 3, 4 & 5 – Laura Ingalls Wilder, Farmer Boy. YES. My son loved this book.

Week 6 – Phyllis Reynolds Naylor, To Walk the Sky Path (about the traditional world of the Seminole Indians). IDK: we did not read this. Possibly substitute Russell Freedman, Indian Chiefs or Elizabeth George Speare, Sign of the Beaver (Newbery Honor book).

Week 7 – No specific book: “read the newspaper.” Fine, read the newspaper . . . but also have your 5th grader read a short book like Beverly Cleary, Dear Mr. Henshaw or one of the international books listed at the end of this review.

Week 8 & 9 – Laurie Lawlor, Addie’s Dakota Winter. NO. We had to order this: I read part, thought “meh,” and concluded there are much better books about pioneer girls readily available in the library (can anybody say “Laura Ingalls Wilder”?!!). Or substitute Newbery Award winner Caddie Woodlawn by Carol Ryrie Brink.

Weeks 10 & 11 – Theodore Taylor, The Cay – NO. The Cay is an okay book, but the themes are too adult for a fifth grader and there are far better books your child could be reading. Consider instead Jean Craighead George, My Side of the Mountain or Christopher Paul Curtis, The Watsons Go to Birmingham.

Weeks 12 & 13 – Richard Atwater, Mr. Popper’s Penguins. YES, a fun read.

Weeks 14 & 15 – Alfred Slote, Hang Tough Paul Mather. NO. We had to order this book, and it bored my son to tears. I suggest Betsy Byars, Summer of the Swans instead.

Week 16 – No specific book: “Have your child read a biography.” YES. Biographies rock!

Weeks 17 & 18 – Robert Kimmel Smith, War with Grandpa. NO. First, this book wasn't in the library and we had to order it. Second, my son thought the book was just okay (not great) and admitted it's a weird, unrealistic story. Third, the premise bothers me: an 11 or 12-year-old boy is livid that he has to give up his room when his grandfather moves in and SEEKS REVENGE by doing mean, sneaky things to the grandfather. Again, NO . . . even though the revenge attempts usually backfire, the book is supposed to be humorous, and in the end the boy realizes he is being petty. You'd think the ending would justify the cringe-worthy plot, but for me it didn't. Anyway! I suggest Kate DiCamillo, Tale of Despereaux or Roald Dahl, Danny, Champion of the World instead. Both books are genuinely light-hearted and fun in a way that War with Grandpa TRIES to be (but is not).

Weeks 19 & 20 – Natalie Babbitt, Tuck Everlasting. NO. (You may disagree: this is a Newbery Award winner that many like, but I don’t like the premise that it is desirable to want to live forever, and that a spring exists which can actually make that a reality). I suggest Frances Hodgson Burnett, The Secret Garden or Doris Gates, Blue Willow. Or, if your child did not read Joanna Hurwitz' Aldo books in third or fourth grade, fifth grade is not too late to encounter these marvelous books: Much Ado About Aldo, Aldo Applesauce, Aldo Peanut Butter and Aldo Ice Cream (can you tell that Aldo likes good food?!!!)

Weeks 21 & 22 – Candy Dawson Boyd, Circle of Gold. YES. A wonderful story, but it may interest girls more than boys. A boy would love Walt Morey, Gentle Ben.

Week 23 – Ken Mochizuki, Baseball Saved Us (a picture book). IDK: we didn’t read it. I’d substitute a short novel like Patricia MacLachlan, Sarah Plain and Tall, or one of the international books listed at the end of this review (most of them are fairly short).

Week 24 – John Reynolds Gardiner, Stone Fox. NO. I began reading Stone Fox and was under-whelmed. The student is supposed to compare and contrast this book with the Disney film “Iron Will” using a Venn diagram. We instead compared Kenneth Grahame’s The Reluctant Dragon with the movie Harry and the Hendersons, but you could use Thomas Rockwell, How to Eat Fried Worms, Katherine Paterson's The Great Gilly Hopkins, or any other youth novel which has been made into a movie. Maybe Johann D. Wyss, The Swiss Family Robinson or Johanna Spyri, Heidi? Both stories are awesome classics available at the library.

Week 25 – No book recommended: you’re supposed to do “life skill” reading (medicine bottles, the newspaper, cereal boxes . . .) NO. Since I don’t like the book for Week 26, spend two weeks on a book like Robert C. O’Brien, Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH.

Week 26 – James Howe, Bunnicula (about a rabbit which is a vampire). NO. I greatly dislike this book and would never recommend it. Continue reading Mrs. Frisby instead, as suggested above.

Weeks 27 & 28 – Lois Lowry, Number the Stars. IDK: I have not read, but it’s probably a great book. I have read, and very much enjoyed, Jane Yolen’s The Devil’s Arithmetic (both books are about the Holocaust, but the stories are very different).

Week 29 – Daniel Pinkwater, The Muffin Fiend. Not in our library, and I haven’t read it, but it’s a nonsense tale in which Mozart, the composer, acts as a detective sleuthing out who’s stealing muffins across Europe. Uh . . . NO. There’s too much excellent literature to waste a child’s time on idiocy. For a short read which can be completed in one week, consider Eleanor Estes, The Hundred Dresses or William H. Armstrong, Sounder. Or, for truly enjoyable nonsense, Astrid Lindgren’s classic Pippi Longstocking.

Weeks 30 & 31 – E. B. White, Trumpet of the Swans. YES, YES, YES. Love it. And my son loved it.

Weeks 32 & 33 – Wilson Rawls, Where the Red Fern Grows. I haven’t read it, but it’s a classic which appears regularly on 5th grade book lists, so it’s probably good. Comparable stories: Fred Gipson, Old Yeller or Sterling North, Rascal. My son read both and loved both.

Week 34 – No book specified: “read a nonfiction book.” Sounds good! Reading non-fiction gets them ready for junior high assignments.

Week 35 – Read a biography of Dr. Seuss, then read his book The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins. IDK: I haven’t read this particular Dr. Seuss book, but Dr. Seuss Day is in March, so maybe Dr. Seuss books should be read then. Maybe these last two weeks could be devoted to poetry. Look in the library for Poetry for Young People books: each one focuses on a different poet, like Robert Frost or Emily Dickinson.

Week 36 – No book specified: “Have your child pick a book.” Now might be the time to let them pick something you would normally roll your eyes at, like Diary of a Wimpy Kid. My son loved Donald J. Sobol's Encyclopedia Brown books at this age, so that's an option as well.

International youth fiction to consider for a fifth grader:

Linda Sue Park, A Long Walk Home (takes place in Sudan)
Deborah Ellis' Breadwinner Triilogy: The Breadwinner, Parvana’s Journey, Mud City (takes place in Afghanistan)
Claire Huchet Bishop, A Triumph for Toto (takes place in Europe after WWII)
Claire Huchet Bishop, Pancakes-Paris (takes place in Paris after WWII)
Jade Snow Wong, Fifth Chinese Daughter (takes place in China)
Simple
Have been using these series as a guide for homeschooling for years. They provide everything you need in the lesson plans!
Grosho
Adore this series!! Wish they made an updated edition!
BeatHoWin
These are ok but make references for books that you need to supplement with that are hard to find. I do like that you can use these as a base and build your own curriculum around them and they are a LOT cheaper than other curriculum's I have found.
Querlaca
Great learning tool!
Braned
I bought this used. I was told it was in excellent condition. There was writing in it. Not a big deal, it erased. I loved the lessons in it, my daughter had fun doing them too.
This book requires you to buy reading books for the reading section, but your have to look at your lesson plans week by week to get the name of the book you will be reading that week or the next three weeks. That being said... My daughter and I are having so much fun going to all our local used book stores and thrift stores to find them all. I found a few at a Church thrift store at a bargain of .25 cents each.

Cool book scavenger hunt for both us!!
E-Books Related to Learn at Home, Grade 5: