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Why Are the Japanese Non-Religious?: Japanese Spirituality: Being Non-Religious in a Religious Culture ePub download

by Toshimaro Ama

  • Author: Toshimaro Ama
  • ISBN: 0761830561
  • ISBN13: 978-0761830566
  • ePub: 1883 kb | FB2: 1350 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Religious Studies
  • Publisher: University Press Of America (November 8, 2004)
  • Pages: 106
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 394
  • Format: mbr docx lit mobi
Why Are the Japanese Non-Religious?: Japanese Spirituality: Being Non-Religious in a Religious Culture ePub download

Why Are the Japanese Non-. has been added to your Cart. This English translation of a Japanese best-seller of 1996 can give you a good explanation on why most of the Japanese see themselves as "non-religious" but prefer to maintain their relationships with their ancestors.

Why Are the Japanese Non-. An English news article of an interview with the author entitled, "Why do Japanese view themselves as irreligious?", in Daily Yomiuri (an English newspaper), May 16, 2000, can give you further explanations on that question, particularly with regard to the Japanese government policy during the Meiji era (1868-1912).

According to Ama, the Japanese generally Why Are the Japanese Non-Religious? .

According to Ama, the Japanese generally Why Are the Japanese Non-Religious?: Japanese Spirituality: Being Non-Religious in a Religious Culture, translated here for the first time in English, was first published in Japan in 1996. It has also been translated into Korean and German. Author Toshimaro Ama examines the concept of mushukyo, or lack of specific religious beliefs. The book, which has sold more than 100,000 copies, is widely popular among students of Japanese culture and ethnicity as well as lay readers desiring to learn more about Japanese religious identity.

Why Are the Japanese Non-Religious?: Japanese Spirituality: Being Non-Religious in a Religious Culture, translated here for the first time in English, was first published in Japan in 1996. It explains how folklore and culture have been integrated into the Japanese religious mind, examines governmental influence over the development of Japanese religion, and introduces several attempts to restore authentic spirituality.

The religious landscape of Japan is largely characterised by syncretism – meaning that . In fact, among those that say they are non-religious, about 75 percent feel that a religious attitude is important.

The religious landscape of Japan is largely characterised by syncretism – meaning that people identify with more than one religion and at times with a combination of two or more. For many Japanese, Shinto, Christianity and Buddhism are all mixed together. Because Japanese people, at large, do not operate with the category of ‘Religion,’ many Westerners assume incorrectly that they are atheist. In fact, religion plays a bigger role among the Japanese people than it appears to the cursory observer. Senso-ji Temple in Asakusa visible in Tokyo, Japan.

Japanese spirituality : being non-religious in a religious culture. Published 2005 by University Press of America in Lanham, Md. Written in English. What does it mean to "lack religious beliefs" (mushūkyō)? The history of being non-religious. Poor religious understanding. Religion and the value of just being ordinary. A village without individual graves. Translation of: Nihonjin wa naze mushūkyō nano ka. Includes bibliographical references (p. -88). Japanese spirituality.

Japanese Spirituality: Being Non-Religious in a Religious Culture

Japanese Spirituality: Being Non-Religious in a Religious Culture. Lanham, Maryland: University Press of America, 2005.

JP): The Ordinarily Un-Religious Japanes. et the Buddhist Population is. .A page from our family’s shrine seal book. et the Buddhist Population is Surprisingly Large! . It’s hard to square the idea of Japan being a non-religious nation with one’s initial observations. Just take a casual stroll through Tokyo, and you’re bound to pass a dozen or more jinja (神社; Shintou shrines) and tera (寺; Buddhist temples). This is the very decorative and elaborate seal created by Taishidou Hachiman Jinja (太子堂八幡神社) near the historic section of Kanazawa. I think this riddle is easily solved by viewing the trappings of Japanese religion as synonymous with Japanese culture.

Irreligion (adjective form: non-religious or irreligious) is the absence, indifference to, or rejection of religion.

Why Are the Japanese Non-religious? Japanese Spirituality: Being Non-religious in a Religious Culture. Lanham, Maryland: University Press of America. While a considerable number of religious organizations had tried to build and maintain political networks up to 1995 to protect themselves from unfavorable interference by the state, the aftermath of Aum surely was a test case for the effectiveness of this strategy and for the influence of religious groups in Japan's political system. This article assesses both facets based on an analysis of the changes the relationship between political parties and religious groups underwent in the wake of the Aum attacks.

Why are the Japanese Non-religious?: Japanese Spirituality Being Non-religious in a Religious Culture. BBS (Bunkachō Bunkakyoku Shūmuka). Shūkyō kanren tōkei ni kansuru shiryōshū. jp/tokei hakusho humu kanrentokei/pdf/h26 chosa.

Why Are the Japanese Non-Religious? : Japanese Spirituality: Being Non-Religious in a Religious Culture, translated here for the first time in English, was first published in Japan in 1996. It has also been translated into Korean and German. Author Toshimaro Ama examines the concept of mushukyo, or lack of specific religious beliefs. According to Ama, the Japanese generally lack an understanding of or desire to commit to a particular organized religion, oftentimes fusing Shinto, Christianity, and Buddhism into a hybrid form of spirituality. The book classifies Japanese religion into "revealed," or organized (i.e. Buddhism or Confucianism), and "natural," or folklore based. It explains how folklore and culture have been integrated into the Japanese religious mind, examines governmental influence over the development of Japanese religion, and introduces several attempts to restore authentic spirituality. The book, which has sold more than 100,000 copies, is widely popular among students of Japanese culture and ethnicity as well as lay readers desiring to learn more about Japanese religious identity.
Coiriel
I purchased this book as research material for a school course where I was writing a paper on Japanese spirituality. Overall, this was an easy-to-read and helpful book that posed many interesting points and gave helpful insights into the Japanese culture, history, and religious attitudes. I would highly recommend if you are studying Japanese spirituality and/or religion, or if you are just interested in Japan at all.

Having been to Japan myself, it is a common stereotype that all US citizens are Christian and this influences the way that they think about us. Yet many US citizens don't seem to take religion into account when thinking of the Japanese, or if they do they only think of perhaps the bits of Shinto that they have seen in anime or samurai movies. This book will help give some realistic insight into the culture and how religion/spirituality and culture are bound together to define what being "Japanese" means.
Vutaur
This English translation of a Japanese best-seller of 1996 can give you a good explanation on why most of the Japanese see themselves as "non-religious" but prefer to maintain their relationships with their ancestors. An English news article of an interview with the author entitled, "Why do Japanese view themselves as irreligious?", in Daily Yomiuri (an English newspaper), May 16, 2000, can give you further explanations on that question, particularly with regard to the Japanese government policy during the Meiji era (1868-1912).
However, I give this English translation 4 stars because, in his lecture in Tokyo in 1998, the author himself used an English word "spontanenous religion" rather than "natural religion", a key word used in the book translated into English by his son, to refer to a type of "religion" that came out spontaneously without any founder, as is the Japanese ancestoral practice. The term "natural religion", in my view, can be misleading, as it can mean a kind of religion that worships the nature such as mountains, the sea, and so on.
Furthermore, the author's view on that question was updated in his lecture that is contained in a Japanese book entitled, "Tami to Kami to Kamigami to" that was published by Kansei Gakuin Daigaku Shuppankai (Kansei Gakuin University Publications), 2004. I hope that the author and the translator will reflect these points in a revised edition of this book in English, if possible.
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