» » Will I Cry Tomorrow? : Healing Post-Abortion Trauma

Will I Cry Tomorrow? : Healing Post-Abortion Trauma ePub download

by Susan M. Stanford,David Hazard

  • Author: Susan M. Stanford,David Hazard
  • ISBN: 0800715128
  • ISBN13: 978-0800715120
  • ePub: 1771 kb | FB2: 1818 kb
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Fleming H. Revell Company (1986)
  • Pages: 173
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 273
  • Format: mbr rtf lrf txt
Will I Cry Tomorrow?  : Healing Post-Abortion Trauma ePub download

Healing Post-Abortion Trauma Hardcover – 1986. Then she found herself increasingly involved helping women who, ten or fifteen years after the event, needed help with the trauma of abortion.

Healing Post-Abortion Trauma Hardcover – 1986. by Susan M. Stanford (Author), David Hazard (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. David Hazard (Author). With her psychological training and Christian convictions, she has found a unique mini¬stry helping to heal one of the most traumatized segments of American society.

Book by Stanford-Rue, Susan . Will I Cry Tomorrow? Healing Post-Abortion Trauma (Old Tappan, . Fleming H. Revell Company, c. 1986), by Susan Stanford-Rue, is a moving personal story. Reared in Montreal, the daughter of a medical doctor, educated in Catholic schools, including an undergraduate degree from Loyola College of Montreal and a master's in counseling from Boston College, Susan never expected to face the issue, but she did.

com's Susan M. Stanford-Rue Author Page. Will I Cry Tomorrow? : Healing Post-Abortion Trauma Jan 1, 1986. Stanford, David Hazard.

Will I cry tomorrow? healing post-abortion trauma. Stanford-Rue. Published 1986 by . Revell in Old Tappan, . Religious aspects of Abortion, Abortion, In library, Biography, Christianity. Susan M. Stanford-Rue, Susan Stanford.

Will I cry tomorrow? by. Stanford-Rue, Susan . Abortion - United States - Biography. Abortion - Religious aspects - Christianity. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Will I Cry Tomorrow? book.

Will I Cry Tomorrow? Healing Post Abortion Trauma by Susan M. Stanford-Rue, P. You Are Wonderfully Made! by Lois Walfrid Johnson. Books on the Abortion Industry. Aborting America by Bernard Nathanson. Beyond Abortion: A Chronicle of Fetal Experimentation by Suzanne Rini. Blood Money: Getting Rich Off a Woman’s Right to Choose by Carol Everett. Grand Illusions: The Legacy of Planned Parenthood by George Grant.

Find Susan Stanford's contact information, age, background check, white pages, property . Known as: S Stanford, Susan J Hendley. Will I Cry Tomorrow?: Healing Post-Abortion Trauma. Author: Susan M.

Find Susan Stanford's contact information, age, background check, white pages, property records, liens, civil records, marriage history & divorce records. Known as: S Stanford, Susan J Hendley Has lived in: Irving, TXHillsboro, TXRiesel, TXStamford, T. .

Surrending the Secret: Healing the Heartbreak of Abortion. Ministering to Women Struggling with Post Abortion Trauma. Will I Cry Tomorrow - Healing Post - Abortion Trauma. For a CPC - abortion recovery for women and families.

Susan M Stanford–Rue wrote about the callousness of an abortion nurse in her book, Will I Cry Tomorrow? .

Susan M Stanford–Rue wrote about the callousness of an abortion nurse in her book, Will I Cry Tomorrow? Healing Post–Abortion Trauma : I glanced at the nurse’s face as we walked down the silent corridor. Will you join us in creating a world where the killing of preborn children is unthinkable and support Live Action News by making your tax-deductible gift today? Defend preborn children in 2020 make your gift to live action.

Book by Susan M. Stanford, David Hazard
Qudanilyr
A Voice for Victoria: A memoir of healing from post-abortion trauma Yes, you will cry tomorrow.
Fordg
book for those of us who have mad the choice to abort and regret it....
Flarik
It was everything that I wanted and was the perfect match! It arrived quickly and surpassed all my needs. It was perfect!
Llbery
Will I Cry Tomorrow? Healing Post-Abortion Trauma (Old Tappan, N.J.: Fleming H. Revell Company, c. 1986), by Susan Stanford-Rue, is a moving personal story. Reared in Montreal, the daughter of a medical doctor, educated in Catholic schools, including an undergraduate degree from Loyola College of Montreal and a master's in counseling from Boston College, Susan never expected to face the issue, but she did.
In part, it all began when the lawyer she married found money and career more interesting than his wife; he didn't want children, at least early in the marriage. As he said, "I just want our kids--and you--to have anything you want. Let's wait until I have my own company. Things will be much more comfortable for us then" (p. 44). So, with time on her hands, hungry for purposeful activity, Susan enrolled in a graduate program in psychology at Northwestern University. Her husband disapproved of her career goals, but she persevered, trying to find in the academic world some of the affirmation and usefulness which she'd not found at home. She did well in her studies and received a Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology, only to be invited to stay on at Northwestern as an instructor! From her husband, however, she received no affirmation or support, and they separated (temporararily she hoped) for a period.
It was, perhaps, understandable when she sought warmth and companionship elsewhere, and a brief week-end affair left her pregnant. She knew she couldn't bring another man's baby into the world and maintain her marriage! So she refused "to think of the 'thing' growing inside my body as a baby." When tempted to envision a tiny person, she "slammed the lid down in my thoughts and feelings" and insisted it was only a "clump of cells. That's all it was. Tissue" (p. 66). Filled with such rationalizations, she resolved to get an abortion. And she did. Immediately thereafter she felt cold and numb, filled with pain she couldn't allow herself to feel. She wanted to cry but couldn't do so. She went about her daily activities, smiled cheerfully, taught her classes on counseling, and tried to believe her abortion was justifiable. Inside, however, she felt she was dying and even considered suicide.
Fortunately for her, some of her friends at the university were believers who assured her that God loved her unconditionally and would forgive her on one condition--if she asked Him. They took her to a weekend retreat, and one of them loaned her some tapes by Father John Powell. One Saturday night, while eating and doing the dishes, she listened to Father Powell, who assured her of God's grace and love. She asked herself: "Is God's love real--or isn't it?" To find out, she went to her bedroom, knelt beside her bed "for the first time in a long while," and prayed: "God, I don't know how to begin this . . . but I can't go on with this emptiness, this desolation. My friends talk of You so personally. They tell me that You forgive all our sins. Do I dare to ask? I wish You could forgive me, too, Lord. I am sorry. So sorry for aborting my baby. . . ." Then the tears flowed. "God," she said, "I'm so, so sorry. I never meant to make such a mess of my life. But this is where I am now. I can no longer carry all this pain and guilt and heaviness and self-hatred. Can You help me?" (p. 103). With those words, she fell forward on the bed and sobbed out her sorrows. Tears and cries, "a wail of grief rose from the depths of me." Two hours later, "emptied at last" (p. 104), she felt at peace and went to bed, sleeping soundly at last. The next morning she awakened and won¬dered if the feeling would last. And it did! "Even before my eyes were clear I knew something was different. It was the strangest sensation, so unfamiliar. I felt light" (p. 104). She found the profound reality of full forgiveness!
Though her husband never took her back, her Christian friends helped her in Bible studies and prayer groups. She gained strength as she healed, succeeded in a series of academic appointments, ultimately remarried, and later established her own counseling clinic. Then she found herself increasingly involved helping women who, ten or fifteen years after the event, needed help with the trauma of abortion. With her psychological training and Christian convictions, she has found a unique mini¬stry helping to heal one of the most traumatized segments of American society.
This book is well-written, compelling, revealing. It not only testifies to the damage done by spouses and abortions--it provides a moving witness to the redeeming work of God in the heart of anyone who comes by faith to Him.
Xanna
I actually read this book in high school after my friend got an abortion. I know there are many more out there but this one sticks in my mind because of the hope of self-forgiveness and peace that it offered to women who have had abortions.
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