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The Sound of the One Hand: 281 Zen Koans with Answers ePub download

by Yoel Hoffmann

  • Author: Yoel Hoffmann
  • ISBN: 0465080790
  • ISBN13: 978-0465080793
  • ePub: 1813 kb | FB2: 1647 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Buddhism
  • Publisher: Basic Books, Inc (January 26, 1975)
  • Pages: 322
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 819
  • Format: azw rtf doc lrf
The Sound of the One Hand: 281 Zen Koans with Answers ePub download

First of all, koans are multi-layered and will present different aspects to the practitioner at different times in her/his study . The main body of the text (not presented by Hoffmann) comprises a lengthy critique and analysis of the contemporary Rinzai schools.

First of all, koans are multi-layered and will present different aspects to the practitioner at different times in her/his study of them, so the idea of a single "correct" response is pretty far off. Second, in many cases the answer that can be written down is not a solid response anyway, especially for one who memorizes and apes i.

Including koans that go back to the master who first brought the koan teaching method from China to Japan in the eighteenth century, this . For all that, The Sound of the One Hand opens the door to Zen like no other book.

What we have here is an extraordinary introduction to Zen thought as lived thought, a treasury of problems, paradoxes, and performance that will appeal to artists, writers, and philosophers as well as Buddhists and students of religion.

Yoel Hoffmann For all that, The Sound of One Hand Clapping opens the door to Zen like no other book. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

When The Sound of One Hand Clapping came out in Japan in 1916 it caused a scandal. Zen was a secretive practice, its wisdom relayed from master to novice in strictest privacy. For all that, The Sound of One Hand Clapping opens the door to Zen like no other book.

Translation of part of Gendai soji Zen hyoron. Hau Hoo; Hoffmann, Yoel. New York : Basic Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana.

Hoffmann's first book of fiction, Kätzchen - The Book of Joseph, was published in Hebrew in 1988. The Sound of the One Hand: 281 Zen Koans with Answers, Basic Books, 1975. He has since gone on to write ten more books in Hebrew, seven of which have been translated into English and published by New Directions; these seven are Katschen and The Book of Joseph (1998), Bernhard (1998), The Christ of Fish (1999), The Heart is Katmandu (2001), The Shunra and the Schmetterling (2004), Curriculum Vitae (2009), and Moods (2015).

For all that, The Sound of the One Hand opens the door to Zen like no other book. Following The Left Hand of God and The Last Four Things, this title reveals the fate of the angel of death. Автор: Paul Hoffman Название: The Last Four Things ISBN: 0141042397 ISBN-13(EAN): 9780141042398 Издательство: Penguin Books Ltd Рейтинг

Yoel Hoffmann (Translator). ANSWER Facing his head to the north and lying on his side, the pupil recreates the reclining state of Buddha entering nirvana more

Yoel Hoffmann (Translator). Ben-Ami Scharfstein (Introduction). In clapping both hands a sound is heard; what is the sound of the one hand? ANSWER The pupil faces his master, takes a correct posture, and without a word, thrusts one hand forward. MASTER If it’s that convenient a thing, let me hear it too! ANSWER Without a word, the pupil slaps his master’s face. ANSWER Facing his head to the north and lying on his side, the pupil recreates the reclining state of Buddha entering nirvana more. Aug 29, 2019 Christopher Bassett MD rated it did not like it.

this vibrations set particles in the sur-rounding medium (typical air) in vibrational motion, thus transporting energy through the medium. since the particles are moving in parallel direction to the wave movement, the sound wave is referred to as a longitudinal wave. the physics of sound - homepages at wmu - a sound wave is an air pressure disturbance that results from vibration.

Quemal
Thanks!
Great book. In great condition.
Minnai
I'm a long-time Zen student and bought this book out of curiosity to see what a collection of "solutions" to koans might look like. First of all, koans are multi-layered and will present different aspects to the practitioner at different times in her/his study of them, so the idea of a single "correct" response is pretty far off. Second, in many cases the answer that can be written down is not a solid response anyway, especially for one who memorizes and apes it. Third, much more helpful reflections on koans are available from many books and anthologies by contemporary Western teachers, which take the time to probe and to translate the sometimes arcane cultural references in koans. For a refreshingly non-esoteric and accessible recent collection, try The Hidden Lamp, a collection of 100 koans with short responses by 100 women teachers.. I wouldn't advise this book for the sincere Zen student. It's the dry husks of koans, not alive at all.
Mr Freeman
The secret of koans that masters don't want or like you to know because then you don't go to need them.
hulk
may be useful to see how some people approach this theme, but it is out of context, both historically and also as to feeling.
sometimes it is far better to read less at one sitting
BroWelm
Though translated flawlessly, the presentation of this text poses something of a problem, being approximately one half of the original Japanese text - written by a critic of the Zen tradition (a Zen Buddhist, using the pseudonym Ha Ho U-O). The 'Koan collection' comprising the bulk of Hoffmann's translation had been presented by the Japanese author - to expose the rigidity of the system concerned. The main body of the text (not presented by Hoffmann) comprises a lengthy critique and analysis of the contemporary Rinzai schools. This book appeared in the fifth year of the Taisho era (1916), presenting something of an embarrass- ment, attacking the whole system of 'koan training' then in use - in the transmission lines stemming from Inzan Ien (1751-1814) and Takuju Kosen (1760-1833). Thus, there is a certain irony in the fact that Hoffmann presented these koan (and their answers) as if handing over the keys to the 'inner sanctum' as it were, when the Japanese author had effectively 'leaked' them out - to show that the system had fallen into a repetitive, lifeless pattern. As Hoffmann acknowledges, these koan - were once sold to 'unsui' or trainess 'under the counter' in certain bookshops - as a kind of 'crib' to help them through dokusan or san-zen. Of course, it remains to be seen whether the Rinzai schools do stick that rigidly to such a formula. It may well be that the Japanese author of the book encountered a certain dogmatism, with a teacher of his own - justly complaining about it (after all, the Japanese text confirms that these documents were used for 'transmission in the secret room') and the author's comments were not founded on baseless rumour. Still, I suspect that most Roshis worth their salt would eschew the use of such a rigid systematisation of the koan.The point is - Hoffmann presented these 'koan' - and their 'answers' - as if they were the 'keys to the temple' - and the Japanese author had said the very converse. In a word, what Hoffmann presents as 'evening dinner' - is what the Japanese author had wanted taken 'off the menu' - and it is not hard to see why. Unlike texts such as the Zenrinkushu, which contain unadulterated extracts from scores of Zen dialogues, the texts presented here have an almost farcical arbitrariness about them - Zen burlesque.
doesnt Do You
Of course, Zen koans don't have answers: that's the point. This book wasn't meant to provide 'instant enlightenment' by giving readers the 'right' answers; it's more like a history book, giving the koans and the answers that the old zen masters supposedly expected from pupils when they were given one. In the final analysis, it's an interesting insight into the zen mind, with about as much relation to actual zen enlightenment as a biography of Louis Armstrong has to actually playing jazz.
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