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Winter Notes on Summer Impressions ePub download

by Fyodor Dostoevsky,David Patterson,Gary Saul Morson

  • Author: Fyodor Dostoevsky,David Patterson,Gary Saul Morson
  • ISBN: 0810108135
  • ISBN13: 978-0810108134
  • ePub: 1645 kb | FB2: 1491 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Publisher: Northwestern University Press; 1 edition (January 1, 1989)
  • Pages: 78
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 143
  • Format: lrf txt docx doc
Winter Notes on Summer Impressions ePub download

Gary Saul Morson (Foreword)

Gary Saul Morson (Foreword). I actually read Winter notes on the Summer Impressions(what would this work be called btw - a collection of essays, a non fiction book?) in the middle of reading Записки из Мертвого дома( I think it is called Notes from the Dead House in English but I'm not sure.

Winter Notes on Summer Impressions" is an essay by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky. The essay consists of the travel notes of Dostoevsky's 1862 trip to Europe as well as his reflections on perception of Russians in Europe. It is regarded as an early statement of some of Dostoyevsky's favourite concepts.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky, David A. Patterson (Translator). Winter Notes on Summer Impressions (Paperback). David Patterson (Translation). Gary Saul Morson (Foreword). ISBN: 0810115182 (ISBN13: 9780810115187). Published June 1st 2009 by Oneworld Classics Limited. Paperback, 160 pages.

Gary Saul Morson's Introductory Study provides an intriguing analysis of the Diary's evolution and its curious character. Above all, it reveals what the Master of Petersburg was trying to achieve with his monthly journal (every issue was written entirely by him) and how well he achieved it. Kenneth Lantz's translation is of a high caliber, filled with cogent and illuminating annotations.

He recorded his impressions in Winter Notes on Summer Impressions . In June 1862, Dostoevsky left Petersburg on his first excursion to Western Europe. bersetzt von. David Patterson.

Among other themes, Dostoevsky reveals his Pan-Slavism, rejecting European culture as corrupt and exhorting Russians to resist the temptation to emulate or adopt European ways of life.

Saul Bellow, Nobel Prize winner.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky was born and raised within the grounds of the Mariinsky hospital in Moscow, in Russia. With his usual comic and cruel candor, Dostoevsky concedes that his observations may be sour and jaundiced, and it is characteristic of him that he does not conceal his bias. Saul Bellow, Nobel Prize winner. Перевод: David Patterson. Издание: перепечатанное.

In June 1862 Fyodor Dostoevsky left Petersburg on his first excursion to Western Europe. Ostensibly making the trip to consult Western specialists about his epilepsy, Dostoevsky also wished to see firsthand the source of the Western ideas he believed were corrupting Russia. Over the course of his journey he visited a number of major cities, including Berlin, Paris, London, Florence, Milan, and Vienna. ا يقوله الناس - كتابة مراجعة.

M. Dostoevsky, Gary Saul Morson. In June 1862 Fyodor Dostoevsky left Petersburg on his first excursion to Western Europe. Ostensibly a trip to consult Western specialists about his epilepsy, Dostoevsky also wished to see firsthand the source of the Western ideas he believed were corrupting Russia. Over the course of his journey he visited a number of major cities, including Berlin, Paris, London, Florence, Milan and Vienna.

In June 1862 Fyodor Dostoevsky left Petersburg on his first excursion to Western .

Winter Notes on Summer Impressions (?????? ??????? ? ?????? ????????????) is an early book-length essay by Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky which he composed while traveling in western Europe. Many commentators believe that in the themes it explores, the essay anticipates his later work Notes from the Underground. In June 1862, Dostoevsky left Petersburg on his first excursion to Western Europe. Ostensibly making the trip to consult Western specialists about his epilepsy, he also wished to see firsthand the source of the Western ideas he believed were corrupting Russia. Over the course of his journey he visited a number of major cities, including Berlin, Paris, London, Florence, Milan, and Vienna. He recorded his impressions in Winter Notes on Summer Impressions, which were first published in the February 1863 issue of Vremya (Time), the periodical of which he was the editor. Among other themes, Dostoevsky reveals his Pan-Slavism, rejecting European culture as corrupt and exhorting Russians to resist the temptation to emulate or adopt European ways of life.
Xarcondre
Granted, nineteenth-century Russia was almost a different planet from modern America. But what do you think of these comments about the Frenchified Russians Dostoevsky disliked?

"It may be that reality around us looks none too lovely even yet; but then we are so wonderful ourselves, so civilized, so European that the common people feel sick at the very sight of us. We have now reached the point where the common people regard us as complete foreigners, and do not understand a single word of ours --- and this certainly is progress, whatever you say. We have now reached a point where our contempt for the common people and the basic principles of their being is so profound that even our attitude to them is stamped with a new, unprecedented and kind of supercilious disdain...and this is progress, whatever you say.

"And then how self-confident we now are in our civilizing mission, with what an air of superiority we solve all problems, and what problems! There is no soil, we say, and no people, nationality is nothing but a certain system of taxation, the soul is a tabula rasa, a small piece of wax out of which you can readily mould a real man or a homunculus --- all that must be done is to apply the fruits of European civilization and read two or three books. And then how serene, how majestically serene we are, because we have solved all problems and written them off."

For some strange reason, this passage made me think of the current situation in the United States.

Maybe we need to craft our own solutions to our problems, and not rely on the Wisdom of the French!

"Whatever you say," this is a very interesting book, in which Dostoevsky sometimes sounds just like H. L. Mencken.

By the way, Joseph Frank, who wrote the book on Dostoevsky, thinks that "Winter Notes on Summer Impressions" is, in an important way, a preliminary draft of that strange masterpiece, Notes from the Underground.

Highly recommended for a cold winter night!
OCARO
The ordinary reader of Dostoevsky knows that he was a Slavophil and a "Russian" Christian, but the extent of his zealotry (or, if you prefer, fanaticism) only becomes clear when you read THE DIARY OF A WRITER and the book under review.

Reading the latter is less of a chore, because the DIARY is about a thousand pages in length, and WINTER NOTES is less than a hundred pages, being a collection of short newspaper articles.

Dostoevsky hated nearly everything about the West. He loathed the bourgeois as much as Flaubert, but for different reasons, that is, he despised "modernity", especially in regard to Christianity, whereas Flaubert's bete noire was contemporary philistinism.

Dostoevsky's belief that "Russian Christianity" was unique, that it would lead befuddled Christians elsewhere to the true gospel of Jesus is beyond absurd. Lunatic nonsense is a true description of what he believed, "sinning your way to Jesus", as, I believe, Nabokov characterized it, and "playing creeping Jesus", as Auden said.

Still, the power of the four great novels and a few of the shorter works makes Dostoevsky's biography an important part of understanding him. It's always puzzled me that KARAMAZOV is a total triumph in spite of the "religious" theme. And the way Dostoevsky contradicts his own beliefs in his fiction, particularly in THE IDIOT, speaks volumes about the "intentions" of a novelist and their bearing on his work.

The disdain that Nabokov showed for Dostoevsky, for example in his essay on CRIME AND PUNISHMENT, demonstrates that dislike of the man isn't a good basis for lit crit. To find CRIME AND PUNISHMENT unacceptable because of its scenes of religious sentimentality is willed ignorance of the overall power of this great novel.

Still, knowing the kind of man Dostoevsky was is important background for understanding his great novels and stories.
Elastic Skunk
Vivid impressions of the author during his travel all over Europe in the second half of the 19th century. His main targets are France (Paris) and England (London).
He gives us a biting and cynical portrait of the French: parvenus and bourgeois who make a mockery of 'liberté, égalité, fraternité'.
In England, he is confronted with child prostitution in London's Haymarket: a most terrible and moving scene of a child of only six, black and blue beaten, barefoot, who tries to lure him to have sex with her. On the contrary, the Anglican clerics preach a religion for the wealthy and don't even hide it. A most pregnant portrait of the fat and the meagre.
A book to recommend.
Fordregelv
Winter Notes ... was used by Dostoevsky as a stamping ground of
literary investigations to produce dramatized fiction on the margin
of acceptability. Some of us expect the characters of all of his
novels to be exceptional from Western European behaviour. And so:
vive la difference!

Contemporary discussion of the nature of whether he was just an
excellent nineteenth century novelist or a prophetic visionary!
Or, both?

Dag Stomberg
St. Andrews, Scotland
Voodoogore
In this book Dostoevsky seems to take his time to criticize capitalism ( or so I find), takes as an example French society,
criticizes the accumulation of money and the adulation of god money (Baal), the servilism that comes with it, analyzes the way marital relations are, that is in relation with capitalism (Bribri and Ma biche ).
I found it pretty good, although it requires you to have knowledge of many things of the time it was written, (for instance can you remember who is Guizot?) and be used to the style of Dostoevsky.
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