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Booking Passage: We Irish and Americans ePub download

by Thomas Lynch

  • Author: Thomas Lynch
  • ISBN: 0393328570
  • ISBN13: 978-0393328578
  • ePub: 1801 kb | FB2: 1861 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Reprint edition (June 17, 2006)
  • Pages: 344
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 831
  • Format: lrf lit azw doc
Booking Passage: We Irish and Americans ePub download

Booking Passage book. I really enjoyed Thomas Lynch's Booking Passage: We Irish and Americans.

Booking Passage book. In thirty-five years and dozens of return trips to Ireland, Thomas. It was an entertaining and quite an interesting part memoir, part cultural study with the most amazing book cover I have seen in awhile.

Thomas Lynch is well aware of how his dual identity strikes others Booking Passage is, as much as anything, a tribute to Nora Lynch, with her catchphrases, unpretentiousness and indomitability.

Thomas Lynch is well aware of how his dual identity strikes others. At home in Michigan, he says, an undertaker who writes poems has all the social cachet of a dentist who does karaoke. In Ireland or England, though, the eccentricity of these combined careers is a cause of acclamation, given that the second is not only followed against the odds, but followed brilliantly. Booking Passage is, as much as anything, a tribute to Nora Lynch, with her catchphrases, unpretentiousness and indomitability. One of these catchphrases, "the same but different", betokens an instinctive attitude of tolerance for everything from idiosyncrasies of the outside world to local lapses of behaviour.

Booking Passage: We Irish. has been added to your Cart. Thomas Lynch is a man inebriated with words, "One could come and go, traveling light in the portable universe of words, counting on images for transport" (Lynch 2005:239). I've read this book wishing Lynch's passages about Ireland had been more lengthy and cohesive. Booking Passage" is a cobbled-together plethora of piecemeal impressions, scattered ruminations mixed with the occasional narrative. The chapter "Death Comes for the Young Curate" contains Lynch's inimitable encounter with a priest on Iona's beach.

In thirty-five years and dozens of return trips to Ireland, Thomas Lynch has found a template for the larger world inside the small one, the planet in the local parish. Part memoir, part cultural study, Booking Passage is a brilliant, often comedic guidebook for those "fellow travelers, fellow pilgrims" making their way through the complexities of their own lives and times. It's hard to define this book. Mostly, it's about the experience of Thomas Lynch and his extended Irish-American family living in Michigan and his going back home to Clare to the relatives still living in the home of his ancestors.

In Booking Passage, Thomas Lynch talks about his Irish-American family and his connections to the village they came from in western Ireland. As a 21-year-old he goes to Ireland and meets his distant. Thomas Lynch has authored five collections of poetry, one of stories, and four books of essays. His first, The Undertaking, won the Heartland Prize for Non-Fiction and the American Book Award, and was a finalist for the National Book Award. His writing has appeared in the Atlantic, Granta, Harper’s Magazine, and the New York Times, among other publications.

Booking Passage: We Irish and Americans. W. Norton & Company. ISBN 978-0-393-32857-8. Michael Delp, Conrad Hilberry, Herbert Scott, eds. (1988). Like My Father Waking Early". Contemporary Michigan poetry: poems from the third coast. Retrieved 2008-06-13. Warnock, Gabrielle; O'Connell, Jeff (2000).

BOOKING PASSAGE We Irish and Americans. 296 pp. The latest American to find himself in the looking glass island is Thomas Lynch - the Michigan poet and undertaker who has made a niche, in our thanatophobic culture, as a thoughtful and consoling essayist on the business of mortality. In "Booking Passage: We Irish and Americans," he draws an enticing picture of his home away from home: the dreamlike environs of Moveen, County Clare, on Ireland's sublime, treeless west coast, in which Lynch locates "a kind of miracle of civilization - where the better angels of the species have bested the ba.

In Booking Passage, Thomas Lynch talks about his Irish-American family and his connections to the village they came from in. .

The personal is Thomas Lynch's strongest suit in his reflections on the post-9/11 world, Booking Passage, says .

The personal is Thomas Lynch's strongest suit in his reflections on the post-9/11 world, Booking Passage, says Stephanie Merritt. Lynch's intentions are unimpeachable in this regard, but while he is excellent on Irish history and the immigrant experience, this desire to extrapolate to the world's problems does give him a tendency to slip into sentimentality and end up sounding like the Irishman at the bar who won't leave at closing time. Summarising a litany of inter-racial and colonial conflicts over the centuries, he concludes: 'When we cut each other, each of us bleeds. The truth of my humanity is that I am none other than my species mates around the globe.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 289-293)

Includes bibliographical references (p. 289-293). Prologue: Fit & start - Introduction: The ethnography of everyday life - The brother - The same but different - Inheritance : a correspondence with Sile de Valera - Death comes to the young curate : a pilgrim's story - Bits & pieces - Great hatred, little room - The sisters Godhelpus - Odds & ends -. On some verses by Irish & other poets

"A good read even for those who have not the least ancestral or national bias―for those who desire civilized entertainment along with brilliant narrative." ―Seattle Times

In thirty-five years and dozens of return trips to Ireland, Thomas Lynch has found a template for the larger world inside the small one, the planet in the local parish. Part memoir, part cultural study, Booking Passage is a brilliant, often comedic guidebook for those "fellow travelers, fellow pilgrims" making their way through the complexities of their own lives and times.

Yggfyn
Thomas Lynch is a man inebriated with words, "One could come and go, traveling light in the portable universe of words, counting on images for transport" (Lynch 2005:239). I've read this book wishing Lynch's passages about Ireland had been more lengthy and cohesive. "Booking Passage" is a cobbled-together plethora of piecemeal impressions, scattered ruminations mixed with the occasional narrative. The chapter "Death Comes for the Young Curate" contains Lynch's inimitable encounter with a priest on Iona's beach. Later, his spleen about a neighbor with the designer pooches and their infinitesimal waste is hilarious, as is his horror at the story of a man, being "taken short," is finally found, having died on an Irish pub's toilet: "Every time I read this I am chilled. Killed in a loo in Killaloe - Bejaysus if it doesn't prove Himself is an almighty joker after all" (2005:227).

Lynch is best describing his heritage and narrating actual events. Canny old Nora Lynch wisely used this well-off American cousin, and in return Lynch earned his Irish stripes. He talks of being broke, yet traveling through Europe; truly broke folks don't get to rent a car, drive to Milan, fly to London, then Detroit, moving "rapidly between the worlds" (242). Lynch is tone-deaf to physical and spiritual realities around him, true of many Boomers of his economic niche, too detached from what is truly uncomfortable. "Strangeness and distance made every utterance precious" (259). To call Lynch's exploitation of being "Irish" and "Catholic" inauthentic is too easy. Lynch's tunnel vision is self-focused, his all-seeing eye blurrily fixated on himself. Something essential is missing, whether in Ireland or Michigan. One derives no real sense of the actual land and dirt of Ireland, the faces of his neighbors and relatives, the way they move, their life. You won't savor what the food tastes like, the smells, colors, sensations, touch, but there's a scattering of architectural descriptions. What you get is what people sound like, and of course they do sound interesting. "Everything is tributary, every image and experience capable of turning in on itself a hundred different ways" (270-271). As in navel gazing, Godhelpus. To Lynch, life is language: words, lyrics, strings of nouns and vowels, meanings imposed by playing with them and scattering them. Tossing `em up in the air to see what interesting wordy detritus results.

Oddly, Lynch includes a poem about drifting like a snowdrift over his ex-wife, "O...O... O..." Over the top, typical boomer-style, pun intended. After his divorce, he rants about extreme feminism in witty manner, but he goes too far bemoaning equality and the abuse of women, as forced mutilation still occurs. His bits on 911 are dated and out of place, too self-conscious. The last chapter is one of the most self-indulgent, narcissistic exercises in the grandiosity of poets and poetry I've ever stumbled upon, worse than wading through a bog. The genuflecting name-dropping of famous poets, and the unfortunate actor, is beyond dull. And his pal Heffernan's poem with "gangs of rowdy robes of fur," and "where animals devoid of any anger/lifting up bits of landscape in their teeth" maddens (248). There's no notion of the country from Canada to the Rocky Mountain West, where grizzly bears roam and chomp up human-made road signs and the occasional human. Many of the book's poems read as head games, politics, boomer-theology, and melancholy narcissism. A wash of words is Lynch's medicine, all hollow sound, no depth, but clever turns of phrase recycled in articles and essays, betokening a shortage of creativity. Thus the ultimate flatness when the reader finally closes this unsatisfying book.

Lynch's descriptions of his sisters and Irish women are a kick: "they are strikingly beautiful, immoveable, and possessed of powers we know nothing of . . . the source of all that is holy and hazardous . . . a matrilineage that finds its way back to the kitchen and cauldron in a boggy parish in the old country . . . devotees of the votive and vigil, rosary and novena, perpetual adorations, lives of the saints, imitations of Christ, statues of the Blessed Virgin Mary and the Sacred Heart, Stations of the Cross, relics, waters, ribbons and badges, prayerbooks and scapulars - all of which makes them morally superior and spiritually dangerous" (209-210). Indeed.
Moralsa
I'd been waiting for what seemed like too long for a third book of stories from Thomas Lynch, but wondered if his Irish-based tales could possibility be as compelling as his earlier works, which were stories about life based on his career in dealing with the dead (in addition to being a writer, Lynch is an undertaker). But again, just as he used the funeral home as a backdrop for stories not about death but about life, Lynch uses Ireland, land of his ancestory and his frequent visits, as the canvas for telling poignant stories about life. Now I'll give friends copies of "Booking Passage" while i wait for a fourth book from Thomas Lynch.
Malien
Perhaps of most interest to those of Irish ancestry, the author exhibits humor and insight into the Irish - those who stayed and the offspring of those who emigrated. A very pleasant read.
Opilar
I read this as a library book -- and it was so deeply touching that I had to buy a copy for my home library. The writing is superb - as is the exploration of identities, place, and history. What makes a family? Where is home? And it includes a wonderful description of poetry: "If life is linear, our brief histories stretched between baptisms and burials, and the larger history tied to events that happen in a line: and then, and then, and then ... poetry is the thing that twists history and geography and memory free of such plodding." (p. 270) This book should appeal to those interested in Ireland and genealogy to be sure, but also to those simply drawn to a poetic voice.
DART-SKRIMER
Hilarious in parts, I found his diatribe on 9/11, the airport wait between flights, his "rise" to stardom etc. to be egotistical and boring. If he had stuck to Ireland, relatives there, the cottage there, his life in the States and the back and forth between the two, it would have made a better book. I loved it for the brogue and dialogue therein; reminded me of my father who spoke with a brogue imitating my grandparents from Roscommon but it does wander and that's a shame because he seems to have a niche with his close tie to Ireland that could be used again and again in more books perhaps.
Andriodtargeted
This was a great purchase. We were very satisfied and would recommend this vendor to others. The experience was positive.
Gravelblade
Excellent.
I really got into this book. Lynch has a lovely touch. Humor and sentiment, properly mixed.
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