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THE DO-IT-YOURSELFER'S GUIDE TO SELF-SYNDICATION: Using Secrets, Shortcuts, Strategies Psychology to Get Your Column in Print ePub download

by Jill Pertler

  • Author: Jill Pertler
  • ISBN: 1609101812
  • ISBN13: 978-1609101817
  • ePub: 1934 kb | FB2: 1229 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Publisher: Booklocker.com, Inc. (April 29, 2010)
  • Pages: 144
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 454
  • Format: rtf mobi doc lit
THE DO-IT-YOURSELFER'S GUIDE TO SELF-SYNDICATION: Using Secrets, Shortcuts, Strategies  Psychology to Get Your Column in Print ePub download

I bought Jill Pertler's book after reading her detailed, informative piece on syndication on another web site (I. .I would highly recommend Jill Pertler's DIY Guide to Self-Syndication

I bought Jill Pertler's book after reading her detailed, informative piece on syndication on another web site (I believe it was featured in Women on Writing). That short article had a ton of good advice, with an easy to follow writing style, so I felt the book would be a good investment. I'd recommend Pertler's book for several reasons. I would highly recommend Jill Pertler's DIY Guide to Self-Syndication. Reading the book for a week has shown me the long (and hopefully) rewarding path I'll need to get my writing into two, four, and a hundred newspapers. 8 people found this helpful.

In her quick-witted, conversational style, Jill Pertler provides a step-by-step process for self-syndication.

The basics of (good) column writing. Special feature: becoming one with your address book.

Packed with detailed information and useful tips for writers looking to gain readership, name recognition, publication and self-syndication. The basics of (good) column writing. What's in a name? (your column's, that is) Getting a photo (of you!); formatting for online and print use. Short and long terms goals of self-syndication. After the leap: Organization. Approaching newspapers - the query step by step. What to include with your query; what to leave out.

Self-syndicated columnist, Jill Pertler, hopes to assist, inform and enlighten other with her new book, The Do-It-Yourselfer’s Guide to Self-Syndication.

Self-syndication certainly is that, but it can be a satisfying and successful way to take your writing career to the next level. An obvious and important step in getting your column printed in newspapers is finding and contacting those papers. Before getting to the nitty gritty, I have a confession. I’m going to focus on newspapers in this article because that is the most common and obvious syndication choice for most columns. Before you self-syndicate, you’ll need

book by Jill Pertler. In her quick-witted, conversational style, Jill Pertler provides a step-by-step process for self-syndication.

book by Jill Pertler.

Pertler: Meaning of Pertler . Kinder feiern Geburtstag von Pertler. What does Pertler mean? Everything name meaning, origin, pronunciation, numerology, popularity and more information about Pertler at NAMEANING.

For example, it would be difficult to make use of the negative thought . Self-help books for depression: How can practitioners and patients make the right choice?

For example, it would be difficult to make use of the negative thought diaries without first knowing something about common negative thought patterns and ways of challenging them. Thus, potential users are encouraged to first learn about therapy by either closely reading through the information in the app or consulting a popular book on the topic, like Feeling Good by David Burns. A. Feeling Good by David Burns is a self-help book that is designed to improve mood and is based on principles. Self-help books for depression: How can practitioners and patients make the right choice?

In her quick-witted, conversational style, Jill Pertler provides a step-by-step process for self-syndication. Packed with practical information and useful tips on topics like finding and approaching newspapers, building relationships with editors, self-promotion, organization, resources and getting paid. It's all here.
Jek
First, my background: I have been writing a human interest column for a small newspaper (circ. about 30,000) in Maine. I have had about half a dozen clips published, and I am looking to gradually build up my readership. I came to Amazon and purchased three books: DiGregorio's "You Can Be a Columnist," Sedge's "Successful Syndication," and Jill Pertler's "Do It Yourselfer's Guide to Self-Syndication."

I bought Jill Pertler's book after reading her detailed, informative piece on syndication on another web site (I believe it was featured in Women on Writing). That short article had a ton of good advice, with an easy to follow writing style, so I felt the book would be a good investment.

I'd recommend Pertler's book for several reasons. First, it's a comprehensive, almost step-by-step guide to proposing your column to newspaper editors. Pertler goes into minute detail, such as explaining how she set up her email folders to deal with the flood of messages coming in and out, and her daily writing-related tasks (making backups, sending invoices, organizing address books, etc.)

Second, it contains first-hand information from the author's successful (more than 100 papers carry her work) life as a columnist. These include her experiences with fan (and hate) mail, negotiating rights, and taking head shots.

Third, though there are many, many books on how to write well, there are very, very few books specifically on how to sell columns. The two titles listed above were written in 1993 and (I believe) 2000, respectively. They contain decent information, but sorely lack when it comes to today's technology (for example, DiGregorio explains how to create a submission packet, but in an informal poll taken by Pertler more than 15 years later, she says 100% of editors prefer email (note that most larger syndicates still deal in snail mail)). Only Pertler's book discusses new tools such as Twitter, Facebook, and Google alerts.

I wished Jill had written more on traditional syndication (ie., approaching King Features Syndicate or United Media), but she is a self-syndicator and freely admits that she has no experience with traditional syndication. Also, it would have been nice to see a few sample letters to see the wording she used when cold-calling editors. But she does include a template, which at least gave me the structure of the query letter.

I would highly recommend Jill Pertler's DIY Guide to Self-Syndication. Reading the book for a week has shown me the long (and hopefully) rewarding path I'll need to get my writing into two, four, and a hundred newspapers.
Sha
Enjoyable, informative and thorough. This is a great read and a great find! Pertler's book covererd so many small details associated with syndication and yet did so in an easy to "soak in" way. Her writing style is so friendly and inviting. I did not feel overwhelmed by the content. It made it seem like a doable thing....creating a syndicated column. I could tell she had experience in every topic. This is exactly the kind of beginner's manual I was looking for! Thanks Jill.
Tam
A guidebook must contain specific well-detailed instructions about its topic, examples of instructions given, and, relevant sources of further information. It should be written in a direct, fact-filled, details overflowing, informative style, containing no fluffy chit-chat filling page after page (I didn't buy the book for the author's so-called humor). Finally, a guidebook should always leave the reader satisfied that the title delivered. This title, for the most part, delivered about 25% of its content as good information. For the remainder of this "guidebook's" fluff, it did not deliver at all.

The author admits more than once that she doesn't have this column-writing business quite understood yet, and, she's right. Why, then, did she mislead me into buying this book--believing by her title's promise that she was experienced, and, had all answers about self-syndication? I actually read this book in one hour. Afterward, I took a tour of the Internet regarding "self-syndication." I read far better articles on this topic for free (one, written by a PhD, demonstrating what professional research, and, writing looked like). It was clear from this reading that this author was correct in her lack of understanding, she missed some very relevant, important information.

I'm annoyed at myself for buying this nonsense without checking credibility first. It is a POD (print-on-demand) book. Although the changing book market is phasing out major publishing houses, and, is opening markets for self-publishing (providing solid authors opportunities to finally have their work published), it's also allowing any pen to write without benefit of good editing, or, solid content. I actually cringed at some of the content of this book--the author actually devotes 16 long pages to creating headshots for a column. This section was written as the visual equivalent of watching grass grow. Ridiculous.

By the way, typical of a "fluff" book is the amount of white space on each so-called "page." I'd rather not spend any more time providing examples of why you should not buy this book--it's simply not worth my time to write such a long list. Suffice to say, don't buy this--what is it called again?--"guidebook."
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