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Cosmos Crumbling: American Reform and the Religious Imagination ePub download

by Robert H. Abzug

  • Author: Robert H. Abzug
  • ISBN: 0195037529
  • ISBN13: 978-0195037524
  • ePub: 1934 kb | FB2: 1475 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Words Language & Grammar
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; First Edition edition (April 14, 1994)
  • Pages: 304
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 964
  • Format: lrf lrf txt mobi
Cosmos Crumbling: American Reform and the Religious Imagination ePub download

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Robert Abzug's fresh approach to antebellum reform illuminates some of its underlying causes. Abzug explores the antebellum religious imagination, positing that the reformers set about "sacralizing the world"-radically joining Heaven and Earth

Robert Abzug's fresh approach to antebellum reform illuminates some of its underlying causes. Abzug explores the antebellum religious imagination, positing that the reformers set about "sacralizing the world"-radically joining Heaven and Earth. Abzug argues that Lyman Beecher confronted the crisis in New England identity by transferring its spiritual identity as a spiritual Israel to all of America. This sense of mission then drove the evangelical program of reform.

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Abzug, Robert H. SUMMARY.

Third, I am concerned with the relation between sacred and profane elements in reform, treating religious dimensions of social and personal life as equal in importance to those of the so-called secular realm. This last point is crucial.

American Reform and the Religious Imagination. Woman's rights activists proclaimed the case for sexual equality

American Reform and the Religious Imagination. Publication Date - September 1994. Woman's rights activists proclaimed the case for sexual equality.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Cosmos Crumbling: American Reform and the Religious . In the forty years before the Civil War, America was awash in political and social reform movements. Abolitionists stormed against the cruelties of slavery.

In the forty years before the Civil War, America was awash in political and social reform movements. Temperance zealots hounded producers and consumers of strong drink. Sabbatarians fought to make Sunday an officially recognized sacred day.

In the forty years before the Civil War, America was awash in political and social reform movements. Abolitionists stormed against the cruelties of slavery. Temperance zealots hounded producers and consumers of strong drink. Sabbatarians fought to make Sunday an officially recognized sacred day. Woman's rights activists proclaimed the case for sexual equality. Others offered programs of physiological and spiritual self-reform: phrenology, vegetarianism, the water-cure, spiritualism, and miscellaneous others. "Even the insect world was to be defended," Emerson mused, "and a society for the protection of ground-worms, slugs, and mosquitoes was to be incorporated without delay." Cosmos Crumbling brilliantly reassesses the religious roots of these antebellum reform movements through a series of penetrating profiles of key men and women who sought to remake their worlds in sacred terms. Filled with vivid anecdotes and penetrating analysis, the book presents a genealogy of reform cosmology that begins with the American Revolution and ends with "the woman question," the issue that drove a wedge between traditional evangelical reformers and the more radical reformers who questioned the very foundations of the conventional Christian cosmos. Here is the story of Declaration of Independence signer Benjamin Rush, and his lifelong odyssey to bring together his unorthodox Christian ideals and his revolutionary republicanism. Other portraits highlight the guiding role of religion in the careers of the tireless abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison, the evangelical minister Lyman Beecher, his daughter, influential educational reformer Catharine Beecher, and of Angelina and Sarah Grimké, and Lydia Maria Child, fearless women who made enormous strides in reimagining the spiritual and moral power of women and their place in society. There is also an intriguing chapter on leaders of the body reforms, including phrenologist Orson Squire Fowler, who began his career reading the heads of his fellow students at Amherst College for small change, and William Andrus Alcott, who advocated a bland vegetarian diet, cold water bathing, and a profusion of daily rituals to guide his followers through their every waking moment. Arguing that we cannot understand American reform movements unless we understand the sacred significance reformers bestowed on the worldly arenas of politics, society, and the economy, Abzug presents these men and women in their own words, placing their cherished ideals and their often heated squabbles within the context of their millennial and sometimes apocalyptic sense of America's role in the cosmic drama. Tracing the lasting impact of what began as a peculiarly Protestant, largely New England, style of social action on the uniquely American traditions of activism that flourish today, Cosmos Crumbling is a signal contribution to our understanding of the myriad ways in which the quest for enlightenment and salvation continues to shape American politics.
Black_Hawk_Down
Robert Abzug's fresh approach to antebellum reform illuminates some of its underlying causes. Abzug explores the antebellum religious imagination, positing that the reformers set about "sacralizing the world"--radically joining Heaven and Earth. In antebellum America, the language of religion, politics and science all reinforced each other. Abzug argues that Lyman Beecher confronted the crisis in New England identity by transferring its spiritual identity as a spiritual Israel to all of America. This sense of mission then drove the evangelical program of reform. Likewise, William Lloyd Garrison re-imagined the basis of American society by advocating a radical egalitarianism--blacks were entitled to all rights of citizenship. Abzug argues that all reforms sprung from the wellspring of religious imagination. Reformers were rethinking church and society. Inspired by their visions, they set out to remake America. Abzug is convincing. My one main criticism is that Abzug did not set American reform in its larger context. Many American reformers were indebted to their European counterparts. What of the European religious imagination? How was it different from the American? Nonetheless, this shortcoming is small given Abzug's deep insight into American reform. I highly recommend this work to students of antebellum reform or American religion.
Vaua
Abzug does a good job in compiling lots of information portraying an interesting view on religious reform in the antebellum period. However this book is typical of many in the same category: Abzug is a great historian, but not a very good writer. When reading this book it seems that one must translate every sentence into "regular" English. Abzug is simply hard to understand. However, it would be suspected that anyone who reads this book has some background in the field of antebellum time period and especially reform in New England in the early-to-mid-19th century.

Cosmos Crumbling provides some interesting perspectives, but it's a hard read, and when finished you'll probably still be left wondering what Abzug is trying to say. I read the book twice before I had an idea what his main points were.
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