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Histoire politique du monde hellénistique, 323-30 av. J.-C. ePub download

by Edouard Will

  • Author: Edouard Will
  • ISBN: 202060387X
  • ISBN13: 978-2020603874
  • ePub: 1154 kb | FB2: 1949 kb
  • Language: French
  • Category: Foreign Language Study & Reference
  • Publisher: Seuil; Points histoire edition (May 14, 2003)
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 133
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Histoire politique du monde hellénistique, 323-30 av. J.-C. ePub download

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Edouard Will's huge survey of the Hellenistic World is without doubt one of the great classics in the field. Why it has never received an English translation is beyond comprehension. First published in the sixties, it chronicles the period from the death of Alexander the Great (323BC) to the Roman conquest of Egypt by Augustus (30BC).

ISBN: This is a book written in French. It contains two huge volumes in one book. It is written with very small characters esp.

Hellenistic Political History - Édouard Will: Histoire politique du monde hellénistique (323–30 av. Tome i: De la mort d'Alexandre aux avènements d'Antiochos III et de Philippe V. (Annales de l'Est, Mémoire no. 3. Pp. 369. Nancy: Université, Faculté des Lettres, 1966. Corpus Christi College, Oxford.

Stewart Irvin Oost, " Histoire politique du monde hellénistique (323-30 av. Vol. I: De la mort d'Alexandre aux avènements d'Antiochos III et de Philippe V. Edouard Will," Classical Philology 63, no. 3 (Ju. 1968): 244-245.

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Place of Publication. This item is overweight. AR 631 011. View more books, in related categories: Ancient World European History Greece and Rome History Humanities.

Studied Histoire politique du monde hellénistique (323-30 av. at Info Dépatement d'Histoire Université Felix Houphouet Boigny De Cocody.

Items related to HISTOIRE POLITIQUE DU MONDE HELLENISTIQUE (323-30 A. .Book Description L'Universite De Nancy, Nancy, 1979.Histoire politique du monde hellenistique (323-30 av . tome I: de la mort D'Alexandre aux avenements D'antiochos III et de philippe V. ISBN 13: 9782864800279. Softcover. Published by L'Universite De Nancy, Nancy (1979). ISBN 10: 2864800276 ISBN 13: 9782864800279. Condition: Near Fine.

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This is a book written in French. It contains two huge volumes in one book. It is written with very small characters especially for notes. However, the text can be read cursively if one wants to skip the notes. The notes are intended for scholars and students who are studying the subject, and they are given after each chapter. For instance, if you want to study just the Peace Treaty of Apamaea, you have to read the text and the notes which provide a bibliography: classical sources then modern authors. The works of those sources and modern authors are discussed. Will indicates when one author is right or when he has neglected or overlooked one event or fact/circumstance. The text whether in itself or in the notes is written in perfect, delightful French. From more than 1000 pages, I vould detect a few typos, here and there, all the rest being absolutely perfect. It presents itself in chapters within the two books in one. Will seems to be talking to the reader, so alive is his writing and the choice of his words. His terminology is extraordinarily precise and varied. His style is rich and strong. In short, the book is a delight and I recommend it not only to students and scholars but to whoever wants to just elope from the everyday routine and learn what was going on some 2300/ 2000 years ago.
Reighbyra
Edouard Will's huge survey of the Hellenistic World is without doubt one of the great classics in the field. Why it has never received an English translation is beyond comprehension. First published in the sixties, it chronicles the period from the death of Alexander the Great (323BC) to the Roman conquest of Egypt by Augustus (30BC). Its extensive scope and incisive analysis place it far above most English-language books on the same subject. The author, one of France's foremost experts on the ancient Mediterranean world, specialized in classical Greek civilization and taught at the University of Nancy for many years.

Will's book is divided into four successive parts, presented in two separate volumes:

Volume One
Part I: The Dislocation of Alexander's Empire and the formation of the great Hellenistic kingdoms (323-276BC)
Part II: Impossible Stability (281-223BC)

Volume Two
Part III: The Crisis of the Hellenistic World (223-164BC)
Part IV: The End of the Hellenistic World (164-30BC)

The central theme in Part I is that none of Alexander's generals wished to see another of his rivals grow too powerful and succeed the dead king at the helm of a united empire. The fragmentation of Alexander's realm into rivaling kingdoms was by no means a foregone conclusion, and at first did not seem likely. Perdiccas, Antigonus "the one-eyed" Gonatas, and his son Demetrius Poliorcetes each in turn attempted to restore a united monarchy. Two decades of warring and scheming eventually saw them defeated. A new political order emerged with its balance of power centered upon three main kingdoms: Ptolemaic Egypt, Antigonid Macedonia, and Seleucid Syria. Will devotes a good hundred pages to this process, pointing out that although this re-organization safeguarded Greek and Macedonian domination of the Orient, it later played a fundamental role in the inability of these states to stand together against Rome. Part I concludes with a brief overview of Agathocles of Syracuse and the campaigns of Pyrrhus of Epirus in Italy and Sicily.

In Part II, Will emphasizes that the dynasties in Macedonia and Syria were at first very unstable, and had to fight several extensive campaigns in order to secure control over their lands (sometimes unsuccessfully). The Seleucid monarchy, with its vast expanses of land, populated by a colorful mix of ethnic groups, faced a near-impossible task. In Asia Minor, they were unable to prevent Mithridates I of Pontus from developing an independent kingdom, and lost many of their possessions to Attalus of Pergamum. In the East, the disintegration of Seleucid authority was even more serious, as Bactria seceded and the Parthians revolted under Arsaces. Moreover, the Seleucids were perpetually at war with Ptolemaic Egypt for control of Phoenicia and Coele-Syria. During the Third Syrian War, they suffered a disastrous defeat when Ptolemy III captured Babylon. Similar problems affected the Antigonids in Macedonia. Pyrrhus of Epirus nearly toppled the Antigonid dynasty early on, and they were continually opposed by Greek cities (especially Athens and Sparta). Macedonia itself was invaded by northern barbarians (the Dardanians). The Ptolemies, by contrast, were far more successful in Egypt. Will devotes a full essay to their foreign policy, highlighting their tactic of supporting independent city-states in the Aegean to consolidate their naval supremacy and undermine their rivals.

Part III covers events ranging from the accession of Antioches III of Syria (223BC) to the destruction of the Macedonian dynasty at the Battle of Pydna (168BC). This period is dominated by two colorful characters: Antiochus III of Syria and Philip V of Macedon. Will describes how these two rulers, observing the decline of Egypt's power and the revolt of its native population against Greek rule, made a pact to partition Ptolemaic lands. He argues that this turn of events disrupted trade in the Aegean, and threatened to undermine the power of great trading cities like Pergamum and Rhodes (which had thrived thanks to Egyptian patronage). Both of these states played a major role in Rome's decision to intercede against Antiochus and Philip in order to "protect the freedom of the Greeks" (an early example of a well-crafted propaganda campaign). Rome's victories at the Battles of Cynoscephalae (197BC) and Magnesia (190BC), along with the decision to partition the Macedonian kingdom following the Third Macedonian War, are all discussed in great detail. This section ends by looking at the reign of Antiochus IV and the revolt of the Maccabees.

Part IV depicts how Rome exploited the weaknesses of the Hellenistic states to rapidly expand its empire in the Orient. Will explains why Rome became increasingly embroiled in Egyptian affairs due to its growing economic dependency on wheat. The Romans adopted a cautious policy towards Egypt, preferring to fund and support Ptolemaic figureheads rather than assume direct control of their kingdom. This policy changed, however, when Rome was re-organized into an Empire, at which point Egypt was simply incorporated as a province. Rome was far more expeditious in Greece and Macedonia, both reduced to the status of Roman provinces shortly after their conquest to exempt Roman citizens from taxation. This era also witnessed the rise of two powerful enemies of Rome: Mithridates VI of Pontus and Tigranes II of Armenia. Their alliance forced Rome to send some of its greatest generals against them (Sulla, Lucullus, Pompey). The end of the Hellenistic Age is often described as an encounter between "East" and "West" that gave rise to a rich cultural interchange, and consolidated the foundations of Rome's economic power.

In conclusion, this is a very useful reference book to have that should be considered a must for any student of the ancient world. It's extremely detailed, and many of its arguments still hold true today. Unfortunately, the book doesn't contain a single map (the French are notorious for this), so it must be complemented with other materials. But its examination of political affairs and international relations is absolutely first-rate. Sadly, I can only express my frustration that no major English-language publisher has deemed it worthy of translation.
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