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Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage ePub download

by Richard Allsopp

  • Author: Richard Allsopp
  • ISBN: 9766401454
  • ISBN13: 978-9766401450
  • ePub: 1281 kb | FB2: 1683 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Dictionaries & Thesauruses
  • Publisher: University of the West Indies Press; New Ed edition (October 15, 2013)
  • Pages: 776
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 230
  • Format: mbr azw docx azw
Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage ePub download

Glossary of Linguistic Terminology Used in the Dictionary. 2. National Symbols of Caribbean States. Citation Codes for Bibliographical References Used in the Dictionary. French and spanish supplement.

Glossary of Linguistic Terminology Used in the Dictionary. How to Use the Supplement. Territorial References Used in the Supplement.

Read instantly in your browser. The Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work. by Richard Allsopp (Author), Jeanette Allsopp (Contributor). ISBN-13: 978-0198661528.

The 'Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage' was compiled by Richard Allsopp, and was first published in 1996. It records a rich variety of words spoken in land scattered over 1 million square miles. Allsopp believed that a dictionary of Caribbean English usage would help to fix and promote the words and phrases used in these regions, words that are different from 'official' English but that are, in the Caribbean, essential components of everyday life. The process of collecting words for the dictionary was complicated.

Richard Allsopp’s books. The Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage by. Richard Allsopp, Jeannette Allsopp.

a b Allsopp, Richard ; Allsopp, Jeannette (2003). Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage. University of the West Indies Press. ISBN 978-976-640-145-0. Engerman, Stanley L. (2000). A Population History of the Caribbean". In Haines, Michael . Steckel, Richard Hall (ed. A Population History of North America.

Allsopp, Richard, Ed. This dictionary is designed to provide an inventory of English usage in the Caribbean environment and lifestyle as known and spoken in each territory but not recorded in the standard British and American desk dictionaries

Allsopp, Richard, Ed. This dictionary is designed to provide an inventory of English usage in the Caribbean environment and lifestyle as known and spoken in each territory but not recorded in the standard British and American desk dictionaries.

Allsopp, Richard; Allsopp, Jeannette (2003). Burrowes, Audrey (in collaboration with Richard Allsopp), 1983. Barbadian Creole: A note on its social history and structure"

Allsopp, Richard; Allsopp, Jeannette (2003). Barbadian Creole: A note on its social history and structure".

Richard Allsopp, Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage. University of the West Indies Press, 2003). Caribbean English Creole. Most speakers of Caribbean English Creole can switch between Creole and standard English, as well as intermediate forms between the two. At the same time, however, they may retain some distinctive features of Creole grammar. They may mark past-tense and plural forms inconsistently, for example, saying things like, 'She give me some book to read.

Richard Allsopp was a Ghayanian and Barbadian lexicographical scholar and linguistics educator. Allsopp was the first West Indian to be included in the board of the New Oxford English Dictionary.

Welcome to e-content platform of John Benjamins Publishing Company. Richard Allsopp, Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage.

The Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage is the first attempt for over four hundred years to provide an authentic record of current English from the Caribbean archipelago, Guyana and Belize. Drawing its data from a broad range of enquiry through teacher workshops in 22 territories in 18 states, from speech recordings and over 1,000 written sources of Caribbean literature, reference works, magazines, pamphlets and newspapers, the Dictionary surveys a range of over 20,000 words and phrases and includes hundreds of illustrative citations. With a specially designed system of labeling, the Dictionary offers maximum levels of clarity and accessibility Providing four levels of identification from Creole to Formal, and with labels to denote social or grammatical register, it also gives particular focus to Indic and French Creole loan-words. Etymological and Usage Notes are included, as well as a short supplement listing Caribbean French and Spanish equivalents to Caribbean English items selected from the main work. Covering as it does a large number of independent and non-contiguous states, the Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage is not only an instrument of education wherever Caribbean
watchman
The expressions and words I used growing up were all listed here. My daughters and nieces now understand the language of their parents.
Enila
Gift. Nice.
Hanelynai
Professor Allsop has been working on this volume for a long time, but for those with an interest in language, it was worth the wait.
There are two outstanding features to this dictionary. The first is the most obvious one: the etymology of words used in daily Caribbean life emphasises not just the culturally diverse origin of language in the region (indigeneous, European and African), but the capacity Caribbean people have displayed to come to terms through language with that diversity. The second thing is the wonderful contrast between the erudite and clinical definitions of the words, and the words themselves, which are alive with the musicalness that characterizes Caribbean English.
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