» » Millennium Star Atlas: An All-Sky Atlas Comprising One Million Stars to Visual Magnitude Eleven from the Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues and Ten Thousand Nonstellar Objects

Millennium Star Atlas: An All-Sky Atlas Comprising One Million Stars to Visual Magnitude Eleven from the Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues and Ten Thousand Nonstellar Objects ePub download

by Roger W. Sinnott,Michael A. C. Perryman

  • Author: Roger W. Sinnott,Michael A. C. Perryman
  • ISBN: 0933346840
  • ISBN13: 978-0933346840
  • ePub: 1412 kb | FB2: 1651 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Atlases & Maps
  • Publisher: Sky Pub Corp; 3 volume slipcased set edition (November 1, 1997)
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 458
  • Format: azw lrf mobi txt
Millennium Star Atlas: An All-Sky Atlas Comprising One Million Stars to Visual Magnitude Eleven from the Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues and Ten Thousand Nonstellar Objects ePub download

Write the headline: someone in the star atlas business actually gets the message.

I hope this fine atlas will come back in print, although I can see why it won't. Each of the three volumes covers one gore (strip of sky from pole to pole) of 8 hours of right ascension. Write the headline: someone in the star atlas business actually gets the message. Sequencing charts in ascending right ascension is backwards.

Millennium Star Atlas book. 0933346824 (ISBN13: 9780933346826).

The Millennium Star Atlas is a remarkable map of the celestial sphere, undertaken by Sky Publishing Corporation in collaboration with the European Space Agency and the Hipparcos scientific community.

Three volumes with slipcase.

Millennium star atlas Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Millennium star atlas from your list? Millennium star atlas. Published 1997 by Sky in Cambridge, MA. Written in English.

The Millennium Star Atlas Softcover E. Feb 2006 by Roger W. Sinnott & Michael . This 10 map atlas of the night sky is drawn by Wil Tirion and us based upon the Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogs with a stellar limiting magnitude of . Opposite each full page map Brian Skiff of the Lowell Observatory has prepared a tabular listing of interesting objects visible in binoculars or small telescopes.

Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues and Ten Thousand Nonstellar Objects by Roger W. Sinnott, Michael .

Perryman PDF, ePub eBook D0wnl0ad.

The Millennium Star Atlas was constructed as a collaboration between a team at Sky & Telescope led by Roger Sinnott, and the European Space Agency's Hipparcos project, led by Michael Perryman. This 1997 work was the first sky atlas to include the Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogue data, extending earlier undertakings in terms of completeness and uniformity to a magnitude limit of around 10–11 magnitude. It appeared as a stand-alone publication, and as three volumes of the 17-volume Hipparcos Catalogue.

a team at Sky & Telescope led by Roger Sinnott, and the European Space Agency's Hipparcos project, led by Michael Perryman. Gaia (spacecraft) Parallax Proper motion Tycho-2 Catalogue Astrometry.

This is a description from Wikipedia: The Millennium Star Atlas was constructed as a collaboration between a team at Sky & Telescope led by Roger Sinnott, and the European Space Agency's Hipparcos project, led by Michael Perryman. It was the first sky atlas to include the Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogue data, extending earlier undertakings in terms of completeness and uniformity to a magnitude limit of around 10-11 magnitude. It appeared as a stand-alone publication,[1] and as three volumes of the 17-volume Hipparcos Catalogue. The 1548 charts include one million stars from the Hipparcos and Tycho-1 Catalogues, three times as many as in any previous all-sky atlas; more than 8000 galaxies with their orientation; outlines of many bright and dark nebulae; the location of many open and globular clusters; and some 250 of the brightest quasars. The non-stellar objects in the atlas are identified by type and designation. The chart scale is 100 arcsec/mm, matching that at the focus of an 8-inch f/10 Schmidt-Cassegrain. Star magnitudes are essentially Johnson V. Distance labels are given for stars within 200 light-years of the Sun. Proper motion arrows are given for stars with motions exceeding 0.2 arcsec/yr. Variable stars are indicated by amplitude and variability type. Many thousands of already known and newly discovered double stars are depicted with tick marks indicating separation and position angle.
Mpapa
Not disappointed..an excellent star atlas. Well packaged and arrived in great condition. Thank you.
Fearlesshunter
Great reference star atlas as expected. Would recommend that anyone who orders this should also have a copy of the pocket star atlas (Sky & telecope publication, also available at Amazon) as well. In addition, if you are using an atlas outdoors in adverse weather, the Sky Atlas 2000, laminated edition is great to have. Only complaint was that of "false" advertising, in that the description of the item stated that it was a hardcover edition, which is not.
Modred
I bought this atlas from Sky Publishing when it first came out in 1997, and am sad to hear that it is out of print.

One of the great virtues of this atlas is the way the charts are arranged. In other atlases, (e.g. Uranometria, Tirion's Sky Atlas 2000.0, Pyotr Breck's Atlas), the charts are arranged in ascending order of Right Ascension; sounds logical, but, when you get to the right side of the chart, instead of flipping to the next chart, as you would in a traditional road atlas, you have to go to the previous chart! Also, when you get to the lest side of the page, instead of flipping to the previous page, you must turn to the following page. (I can see what inspired Leslie Peltier, as he reports in his book STARLIGHT NIGHTS, to memorize his star charts!) In the MILLENNIUM STAR ATLAS, the charts are arranged in descending order of right ascension, so this inconvenience is resolved.

I hope this fine atlas will come back in print, although I can see why it won't.
Modifyn
Given that this atlas is the first to show stars to 11th magnitude, it is a pleasure to see it so well executed.

Each of the three volumes covers one gore (strip of sky from pole to pole) of 8 hours of right ascension. This arrangment has the advantage of keeping the part of the sky visible at a given time in the same volume.

Roll the drums! Write the headline: someone in the star atlas business actually gets the message. Sequencing charts in ascending right ascension is backwards. After decades of frustration, users finally have an atlas with charts sequenced in descending order of right ascension. One has to try it both ways to appreciate the difference. In atlases with north at the top and charts in ascending order, users are constantly fighting against their instinct as to which way to turn the page on reaching the edge of a chart. But in the Millennium, the user who reaches the right edge of a chart simply continues rightward to the next page; from the left edge, leftward to the previous page. This arrangement makes navigating the charts so intuitive that within the gore the numbers of adjacent charts at the left and right edges are unnecessary and have been omitted. Atlas writers who unthinkingly follow the tradition of ordering charts in ascending right ascension should take note.

Charts are clear and detailed without being crowded. Top and bottom of each page give the numbers of the adjacent charts; this greatly simplifies navigating through the atlas. A minor complaint is that adjacent chart information does not extend to charts in other volumes. Charts at the edges of a gore should say at their edges something like "Continues on Vol II Chart 235."

A measure of how good this atlas is is that other suggestions for improvement are merely speculative. The charts could maybe be bigger to cover more area and simplify navigation, maybe like the Sky Atlas 2000.0, but would bigger pages make the atlas awkward to use? Would they make it impracticable to print charts on both sides of the page? Numbered tabs for quick chart access are helpful, but are they practicable for an atlas which contains so many pages? Would tabs every 25 to 50 pages be helpful? Hard to say.

What is not hard to say is that this atlas is a superbly useful work.

It works nicely in combination with the Pocket Sky Atlas. Use the Pocket for quick basic finding and the Millennium for going deep in pursuit of the challenging stuff.
Tall
I guess I'm old fashioned when it comes to using a telescope, but I prefer a paper atlas to laptops and software star atlases. And I also prefer star-hopping to using GOTO or setting circles. If you're like me, you already know you're buying this massive work. Yes it's expensive. Yes it weighs about twenty pounds. But it's the ultimate paper atlas for the star-hopper. The three volumes (each covering eight hours of RA) together have over one million stars plotted on their pages!
The binding and paper are of superb quality, sufficient for this atlas to actually be used out in the field! Unfortunately, after you see how pretty it is (and remember how much it cost), you'll probably be content to let it sit safely on the shelf to be used as a reference. Personally, I use an 8" Dob and hence generally observe objects bright enough for Tirion's Sky Atlas 2000.0 to be an adequate atlas. I have taken the MSA out a couple times but it was overkill.
For owners of larger scopes who wish to go after the fainter DSOs, a Mag 11 atlas like the MSA is a bare minimum. A computer atlas going down to Mag 13 or so would be even better, but if you like paper then the MSA is the way to go. I eventually do plan to make heavy use of the MSA out in the field, but probably not until I get a larger scope.
The closest competition to the MSA is Tirion's Uranometria 2000.0 2nd Edition. Note that although it doesn't plot anywhere near the number of stars the MSA does, Uranometria plots three times the number of deep sky objects (30,000). Therefore, owners of very large telescopes may be better served with Uranometria since it plots the very faint DSOs that MSA skips.
E-Books Related to Millennium Star Atlas: An All-Sky Atlas Comprising One Million Stars to Visual Magnitude Eleven from the Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues and Ten Thousand Nonstellar Objects: