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Drones, Clones, and Alpha Babes: Retrofitting Star Trek's Humanism, Post-9/11 ePub download

by Diana M.A. Relke

  • Author: Diana M.A. Relke
  • ISBN: 1552381641
  • ISBN13: 978-1552381649
  • ePub: 1399 kb | FB2: 1990 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Women's Studies
  • Publisher: University of Calgary Press (April 30, 2006)
  • Pages: 190
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 486
  • Format: txt rtf lit lrf
Drones, Clones, and Alpha Babes: Retrofitting Star Trek's Humanism, Post-9/11 ePub download

In Drones, Clones and Alpha Babes, Diana Relke sheds light on how the Star Trek narratives influence and are influenced by shifting cultural values in the United States, using these as portals to the sociopolitical and sociocultural landscapes of the United States, pre- and post-9/11

In Drones, Clones and Alpha Babes, Diana Relke sheds light on how the Star Trek narratives influence and are influenced by shifting cultural values in the United States, using these as portals to the sociopolitical and sociocultural landscapes of the United States, pre- and post-9/11.

Hayles 1999; Relke 2006; Haraway 1985; Haraway 1991; Dinello 2005; Balinisteanu 2007; Larson 1997; Barad and . Like all good science fiction the Borg of Star Trek are not a kind of prediction of what might happen in the not-too-distant future

Hayles 1999; Relke 2006; Haraway 1985; Haraway 1991; Dinello 2005; Balinisteanu 2007; Larson 1997; Barad and Robertson 2001: 79-95; Murphy and Porter 2008; Bostic 1998). Like all good science fiction the Borg of Star Trek are not a kind of prediction of what might happen in the not-too-distant future. Instead they help us visualize, examine, and understand the present.

In Drones, Clones and Alpha Babes, author Diana Relke sheds light on how the Star Trek narratives influence and are influenced b. .

Start by marking Drones, Clones, and Alpha Babes: Retrofitting Star Trek's Humanism, Post -9/11 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The number of books, both popular and scholarly, published on the subject of Star Trek is massive, with more and more titles printed every year. In Drones, Clones and Alpha Babes, author Diana Relke sheds light on how the Star Trek narratives influence and are influenced by shifting cultural values in the United States, using these as portals to the sociopolitical and sociocultural landscapes of the .

Clones, and Alpha Babes" by Diana Relke book because I was interested in the post 9/11 aspects of Star Trek. Trek episodes of the 1990's, which may be perceived as a lot more liberal than Star Trek episodes after 9/11.

I had bought "Drones, Clones, and Alpha Babes" by Diana Relke book because I was interested in the post 9/11 aspects of Star Trek. However, the book mostly deals with Star Trek The Next Generation, which ran up to 1994 and Star Trek Voyager, which was cancelled in 2001. The show with a distinct post 9/11 aspect, Star Trek Enterprise, is hardly mentioned. The book is rather a look back to Star Trek episodes of the 1990's, which may be perceived as a lot more liberal than Star Trek episodes after 9/11. The book takes a largely feminist look at Star Trek TNG and Voyager episodes.

Drones, Clones, & Alpha Babes considers the dialectics of humanism & post-humanism, the pervasiveness .

Drones, Clones, & Alpha Babes considers the dialectics of humanism & post-humanism, the pervasiveness of advanced technology, & the complications of gender identity inherent in the Star Trek series franchise. Relke sheds light on how the Star Trek narratives influence & are influenced by shifting cultural values in the United States, using these as portals to the sociopolitical & sociocultural landscapes of pre-and post 9-11 United States. Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles

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Relke, Diana M. A. Note: Calgary: University of Calgary Press, c2006. Subject: Star Trek television programs. Subject: Star Trek television programs - Social aspects.

The Star Trek franchise represents one of the most successful emanations of popular media in our culture. Diana M. Relke (Author). The number of books, both popular and scholarly, published on the subject of Star Trek is massive, with more and more titles printed every year Full description Diana M.

In their 1998 book, Star Trek 101, Terry J. Erdmann and Paula M. Block called "Unnatural Selection" the key Pulaski . Relke, Diana M. (2006). Drones, Clones, and Alpha Babes: Retrofitting Star Trek's Humanism, Post-9/11. Calgary, Alberta, Canada: University of Calgary Press. Block called "Unnatural Selection" the key Pulaski episode. Science fiction writer Keith DeCandido felt that she displays all of her worst traits in this episode, including "her stubbornness, her intensity, her constant interrupting of people, her bitching out Data (though at least this time she apologizes to him when. ISBN 978-1-55238-164-9. Samardzija, Zoran (2011).

The Star Trek franchise represents one of the most successful emanations of popular media in our culture. The number of books, both popular and scholarly, published on the subject of Star Trek is massive, with more and more titles printed every year. Very few, however, have looked at Star Trek in terms of the dialectics of humanism and the posthuman, the pervasiveness of advanced technology, and the complications of gender identity. In Drones, Clones and Alpha Babes, Diana Relke sheds light on how the Star Trek narratives influence and are influenced by shifting cultural values in the United States, using these as portals to the sociopolitical and sociocultural landscapes of the United States, pre- and post-9/11. From her Canadian perspective, Relke focuses on Star Trek's uniquely American version of liberal humanism, extends it into a broader analysis of ideological features, and avoids a completely positive or negative critique, choosing instead to honour the contradictions inherent in the complexity of the subject.