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Patriarchy and Accumulation on a World Scale: Women in the International Division of Labour (Critique Influence Change) ePub download

by Maria Mies

  • Author: Maria Mies
  • ISBN: 0862323428
  • ISBN13: 978-0862323424
  • ePub: 1603 kb | FB2: 1145 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Women's Studies
  • Publisher: Zed Books; First Edition edition (August 1986)
  • Pages: 256
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 616
  • Format: azw doc txt mobi
Patriarchy and Accumulation on a World Scale: Women in the International Division of Labour (Critique Influence Change) ePub download

I personally loved the "social origins of the sexual divisions of labour" chapter.

In simple words, white women should face the fact that in as much as they have fought for their own liberation, they have inadvertently supported the same system that oppresses non white and especially black women. I personally loved the "social origins of the sexual divisions of labour" chapter.

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Published by Zed Books, it’s part of their Critique, Influence, Change which features works from Mies .

Published by Zed Books, it’s part of their Critique, Influence, Change which features works from Mies, Vandana Shiva and Samir Amin. Foreword to Maria Mies Patriarchy and Accumulation on a World Scale: Women in the International Division of Labour (Zed Books, 2014).

Women in the International Division of Labour First published in 1986, Maria Mies’s progressive book was hailed as a major . Foreword by Silvia Federici.

Women in the International Division of Labour. Maria Mies With a Foreword by Silvia Federici. First published in 1986, Maria Mies’s progressive book was hailed as a major paradigm shift for feminist theory, and it remains a major contribution to development theory and practice today. 1. What is Feminism? 2. Social Origins of the Sexual Division of Labour. 3. Colonization and Housewifization.

She is a professor of sociology at Cologne University of Applied Sciences, but retired from teaching in 1993. Since the late 1960s she has been involved with feminist activism. In 1979, at the Institute of Social Studies in The Hague, she founded the Women and Development programme. One of the top smartest and best books I've read in the last few years.

ABOUT THE AUTHORMaria Mies is a Marxist feminist scholar who is renowned for her .

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ISBN 13: 9781856497350. Series: Critique Influence Change.

This now classic book traces the social origins of the sexual division of labor. It gives a history of the related processes of colonization and "housewifization" and extends this analysis to the contemporary new international division of labor and the role that women have to play as the cheapest producers and consumers. ISBN 13: 9781856497350.

Accumulation on a World Scale: Women in the International Division of Labour this analysis to the contemporary new international division of labour.

Patriarchy and Accumulation on a World Scale: Women in the International Division of Labour. by Maria Mies and Silvia Federici. Tracing the social origins of the sexual division of labour, it offers a history of the related processes of colonization and 'housewifization' and extends this analysis to the contemporary new international division of labour.

In modern society, there exists sexual division of labour, which is superficially similar to that of patriarchy.

The extent to which the debate has shifted in Tanzania was demonstrated by the International Women's Day celebrations in 1977 where the issue of women and land took a central place  . In modern society, there exists sexual division of labour, which is superficially similar to that of patriarchy.

This now classic book traces the social origins of the sexual division of labor. It gives a history of the related processes of colonization and "housewifization" and extends this analysis to the contemporary new international division of labor and the role that women have to play as the cheapest producers and consumers. First published in 1986, it was hailed as a major paradigm shift for feminist theory. Eleven years on, Maria Mies' theory of capitalist patriarchy has become even more relevant; this new edition includes a substantial new introduction in which she both applies her theory to the new globalized world and answers her critics.
Dondallon
Wow. I'm really surprised that no one has reviewed this book either in support of it or against it. Even though this book is more than a quarter of a century old, the concepts within it are more relevant today than they were when Mies wrote this back in the mid 1980's. Mies predicted the impact of unrestrained capitalism (born in the wake of the Cold War) on the atomization of women from all socio-economic backgrounds and across all borders. Mies offers within this book, an in-depth analysis of a concept she has coined as the process of 'housewifization', where in capitalist institutions shape global policy and perception in order to exploit women in the role of laborers from the underdeveloped world, who produce non-prodcutive consumer goods for consumption by women living in the developed world, who are objectified by capitalist systems and mobilized as one unifying class of housewives as consumers of these goods and services. Mies also details the interplay between the advent of automation and technology within the production process and how these processes have played a role in the dehumanization of people and the destruction of our environment. Mies does invoke some Marxist ideology within her writing but with a gender twist, something that Marx did not acknowledge in his analysis of capitalism. This book is a must read for students of gender studies, history, economics, geography and politics.
Hinewen
This is a neglected classic by an eminent German political economist. Feminists who have focused on analyzing the cultural manifestations of patriarchy will find it an eye-opener as it explains feminist economics. Learn how women produce most of the world's food but are not allowed to accumulate a surplus on their wages, to own or manage more than a tiny fraction of the world's private land, and are the unpaid "base" of market economics with their subsistence, domestic, and reproductive labor. An inspiring writer with an important economic analysis.
Marelyne
This must be the worst book summary on Amazon. "Patriarchy and Accumulation on a World Scale" answers EVERYTHING.

How capitalism grew out of patriarchy, the "blind spot" of Marx that includes most of humanity, the invention of the housewife, how "first world" and "third world" women are two sides of the same fabric, violence against women, violence against subsistence workers, the new international male culture, body autonomy, how women's labor is rendered invisible, the failure of socialist states, the implications of technological advancement, and the increasing "housewification" of labor (which has unfolded exactly as she predicted in the ensuing 30 years).

If that's not enough for one (elegantly written) book, Mies goes on to introduce a NEW THEORY OF LABOR which is stunning in its aptness. She also lays out a vision for women across the globe uniting against the international division of labor.

I could hardly contain myself in the joy of having all these seemingly contradictory pieces of a horrible (patriarchal capitalist) puzzle finally aligned so succinctly in my head. In sum, this is the most important book I have ever read.

My only critique of the book is Mies' theory of the evolution of patriarchy. It veers into biological determinism, while the same breath claiming to denounce biological determinism. It is perplexing, and I wish I could ask her to clarify her thinking directly. But do not let this deter you: Her thinking everywhere else is clear and prophetic.
Nten
One of the top smartest and best books I've read in the last few years. She nails it. Accumulation is picking up at the expense of the world's women and the environment.
Nkeiy
Agree with Emma, this may be the most important book I've ever read. I have a good-sized feminist library and cannot understand why it has taken me so long to finally find a summa of feminist theory that acknowledges that men and women have qualitatively different relations to nature based on female capacity to directly produce with their bodies vs male compensation by developing a predatory, parasitic mode of "production" based on appropriation, killing, and kidnapping. The source of male domination, she asserts, is the male monopoly on weapons. Mies has a sure grasp of Marxism and in particular demolishes the classical Marxist idea that women's work of propagation, subsistence labor (growing food and so on), housework, and working for low wages or in kind in the informal economy, is not productive labor. The old Marxist distinctions between reproductive and productive labor, production and consumption, and use and exchange fall apart when these bases of women's labor are brought back into the concept of production. In this sense Mies goes farther than any other Marxist feminists I have read, who will insist that "housework" or "domestic" labor be included, and may discuss subsistence unpaid labor such as work in family fields, but who will not attempt to draw in women's propagation of the species as production. Her concise discussions of the witch craze, Engels, the history of western colonization, coerced consumerism, and a devastating critique of capitalism are each woth a full book in another's hands. Her globalism is the defining and most valuable feature of the book. We finally see the full scope of patriarchy. She wrote in the full flower of anti-feminist postmodernism, in the 1980s, and seems to have been unaffected by its destructive impact on feminist theory. Highly recommended.
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