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The Speech: Race and Barack Obama's A More Perfect Union ePub download

by Tracy Whiting

  • Author: Tracy Whiting
  • ISBN: 1596916672
  • ISBN13: 978-1596916678
  • ePub: 1680 kb | FB2: 1869 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA; Original edition (August 18, 2009)
  • Pages: 272
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 717
  • Format: lrf doc rtf txt
The Speech: Race and Barack Obama's A More Perfect Union ePub download

After Senator Barack Obama delivered his celebrated speech, A More Perfect Union, on March 18, 2008.

After Senator Barack Obama delivered his celebrated speech, A More Perfect Union, on March 18, 2008. As Omar H. Ali puts it, "The fact is that there are at least as many ways to interpret the words contained within this or any other speech as there are people listening to or reading such words.

The speech was delivered on March 18, 2008 in the course of the contest for the 2008 Democratic Party presidential nomination

Over 100 speeches by Barack Obama. Complete and full text of each speech. A More Perfect Union The Race Speech Philadelphia, PA March 18, 2008.

Over 100 speeches by Barack Obama. Two hundred and twenty one years ago, in a hall that still stands across the street, a group of men gathered and, with these simple words, launched America's improbable experiment in democracy. Farmers and scholars; statesmen and patriots who had traveled across an ocean to escape tyranny and persecution finally made real their declaration of independence at a Philadelphia convention that lasted through the spring of 1787.

A More Perfect Union

A More Perfect Union. I have brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, uncles, and cousins of every race and every hue scattered across three continents. In my first book, Dreams From My Father, I described the experience of my first service at Trinity, and it goes as follows: People began to shout, to rise from their seats and clap and cry out, a forceful wind carrying the reverend's voice up to the rafters.

The speech on race that saved Obama’s candidacy

The speech on race that saved Obama’s candidacy. Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign was almost derailed after racially charged sermons by his former minister, Jeremiah Wright of Chicago's Trinity United Church of Christ were released. After initiall downplaying the controversy, Obama faced it head on during his "A more perfect union" speech given in Philadelphia at the National Consitution Center. By Michael Fletcher April 22, 2016.

Two hundred and twenty one years ago, in a hall that still stands across the street, a group of men gathered and, with. I have brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, uncles and cousins, of every race and every hue, scattered across three continents, and for as long as I live, I will never forget that in no other country on Earth is my story even possible. And in that single note - hope!

After Senator Barack Obama delivered his celebrated speech, "A More Perfect Union," on March 18, 2008, New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd noted that only Barack Obama "could alchemize a nuanced 40-minute speech on race into must-see YouTube viewing fo. .

After Senator Barack Obama delivered his celebrated speech, "A More Perfect Union," on March 18, 2008, New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd noted that only Barack Obama "could alchemize a nuanced 40-minute speech on race into must-see YouTube viewing for 20-year-olds.

The Speech: Race and Barack Obama's 'A More Perfect Union'. by T Denean Sharpley-Whiting. After Senator Barack Obama delivered his celebrated speech, "A More Perfect Union," on March 18, 2008, New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd noted that only Barack Obama "could alchemize a nuanced 40-minute speech on race into must-see YouTube viewing for 20-year-olds

The Speech: Race and Barack Obama's "A More Perfect Union". A More Perfect Union" is the name of a speech delivered by then Senator Barack Obama on March 18, 2008, in the course of the contest for the 2008 Democratic Party presidential nomination

The Speech: Race and Barack Obama's "A More Perfect Union". T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting. A More Perfect Union" is the name of a speech delivered by then Senator Barack Obama on March 18, 2008, in the course of the contest for the 2008 Democratic Party presidential nomination. Speaking before an audience at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Obama was responding to a spike in the attention paid to controversial remarks made by Jeremiah Wright, his former pastor and, until shortly before the speech, a participant in his campaign.

After Senator Barack Obama delivered his celebrated speech, "A More Perfect Union," on March 18, 2008, New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd noted that only Barack Obama "could alchemize a nuanced 40-minute speech on race into must-see YouTube viewing for 20-year-olds." Pundits established the speech's historical eminence with comparisons to Abraham Lincoln's "A House Divided" and Martin Luther King Jr's "I Have a Dream." The future president had addressed one of the biggest issues facing his campaign―and our country―with an eloquence and honesty rarely before heard on a national stage.

The Speech brings together a distinguished lineup of writers and thinkers―among them Adam Mansbach, Alice Randall, Connie Schultz, and William Julius Wilson ―in a multifaceted exploration of Obama's address. Their original essays examine every aspect of the speech―literary, political, social, and culturaland are punctuated by Boston Globe columnist Derrick Z. Jackson's reportage on the issue of race in the now historic 2008 campaign. The Speech memorializes and gives full due to a speech that propelled Obama toward the White House, and prompted a nation to evaluate our imperfect but hopeful union.

Gaeuney
This book shows the power of the media to misrepresent and how, through manipulation, it can bring unnecessary misery to a person's life, in this case, Reverend Jeremiah Wright. Reverend Jeremiah Wright had been doing great Church work for many years, with a stellar reputation as a Pastor coming from all sides, a man known for being balanced and tempered. Then, the media got ahold of a sound bite, played it over and over out of its larger context, and did everything that it could to ruin him. President Obama, caught in the crossfire of what was going on, decided to make a speech. In that speech, President Obama balanced a number of very difficult things, remaining loyal to his Pastor, and at the same time, not giving into the character assassination he saw going on. He was honest, diplomatic and wise to a fault in dealing with the issue of race head-on. His speech was simply brilliant and will go down in History as such. This book is a collection of critiques of what happened surrounding that situation. It's fair. It's wise. It's balanced and for all of these things, it becomes a great book for reviewing what happened. For all of those who are Barack Obama fans, there is another book that can add to your store of information about him and complement this one. In Thomas D. Rush's “Reality's Pen: Reflections On Family, History & Culture,” you will find a 1989 account of two private conversations between Rush and Obama. In those conversations, Barack reflects on what he envisions in his romantic future, long before he met Michelle. The account is special, in part, because it contains substance that only Rush and Obama heard. It is also special because the comments were made before Obama became famous between he and another guy who were just normal, everyday guys. The interaction is detailed on page 95 of Rush's book in a piece called “You Never Know Who God Wants You To Meet.” Rush's book can be found right here on Amazon, and the Obama story is just one of the many rich stories from the book.
Irostamore
I bought it for a printed copy of the speech, and I haven’t really read the analysis yet; therefore I can’t comment on the authors presentation yet.
Diredefender
I like very much the idea behind "The Speech: Race and Barack Obama's `A More Perfect Union'". Edited by T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting, this book brings together 15 very different people with very differing views on then Senator Obama's speech of March 18th, 2008. As Omar H. Ali puts it, "The fact is that there are at least as many ways to interpret the words contained within this or any other speech as there are people listening to or reading such words. No single interpretation can capture the entirety of what a particular speaker intends, or all the ways in which their speech is received."

As I read each person's thoughts on that momentous speech, I compared it to my own view. There is a nice balance in this book ranging from extremely favorable opinions to disappointment over a chance missed. The essays are generally written in a very scholarly manner (prompting me to look up a few words) and include a great deal of historical context. I found myself trying to look at the speech through different eyes than my own (which saw the speech as yet another example of our President's intelligence and talent) - which I suppose, was really the point of his words that day.

Was I editing the book, I might have made a few changes, though. First off - I would have let the writers know that the historical context of the speech would be provided at the beginning of the book. Many of them laid the groundwork of what was happening in the country and in the election at that time, and the repetition got tiresome by the third essay or so. Also, I would have either placed the text of the speech at the beginning, so that it was fresh in the reader's mind prior to reading the essays or would have broken the speech up - then grouping the essays that touched on each of those aspects together. (And then put the full text at the end of the book.) I found myself reading some parts of the speech over and over again when quoted in the essays, without having the text as a whole in the background of my thoughts.

It is fascinating, though, to share the same experience with other people whose lives are so different from mine. To know that others - like Alice Randall (as I did) "...first heard The Speech on a car radio. And so it came to me initially as words in air. It came to me as songs often come to me, as disembodied sound that reaches the body with a kind of anonymity that entices one to believe that the voice one hears in one's own."

To see pointed out very important elements that I missed: "At the center of The Speech are three words separating then from now: Not this time. These three words are Obama's victory. Not this time. Repeating this phrase twice and repeating the phrase "This time" six times, Obama begins to break with the past."

For me, the most important there of the speech was that "It requires all Americans to realize that your dreams do not have to come at the expense of my dreams; that investing in the health, welfare, and education of black and brown and white children will ultimately help all of America prosper." In our country, where "A recent study conducted at Princeton University revealed that a white felon stands an equal chance of being granted a job interview as a black applicant with no criminal record,". Because we finally have a black president does not mean that all the inequalities have been swept away. But it also does NOT mean, as pointed out by Obama, that the fulfillment of his dream to become president means that whites have lost their chance to succeed as he has.

This speech, this man, is a game changer for our country...in I believe, a wonderful way. Because of who he is, because of what he has done, because of what he will lead this country to become. Closing with an anecdote from Obama's senior adviser, David Axelrod:

"Obama wrote in the middle of the night for the two nights before this speech. At two A.M on the day of the speech, Axelrod woke up to see that Obama had sent it to him on his BlackBerry. Axelrod read it and e-mailed Obama back to say, "This is why you should be president."

Should be and is.
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