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Winnie: My Life in the Institution ePub download

by Jamie Pastor-Bolnick

  • Author: Jamie Pastor-Bolnick
  • ISBN: 0312882300
  • ISBN13: 978-0312882303
  • ePub: 1459 kb | FB2: 1644 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Publisher: St Martins Pr; 1st edition (October 1, 1985)
  • Pages: 248
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 813
  • Format: mobi rtf mobi rtf
Winnie: My Life in the Institution ePub download

Jamie Pastor Bolnick lives with her family and dogs in New York City. Author Jamie Pastor Bolnick, who first came to know Winnie as a young girl visiting the institution, spent many hours interviewing Winnie.

Jamie Pastor Bolnick lives with her family and dogs in New York City. An ex-journalist and photographer, her work has appeared in Redbook, New York Newsday Sunday Magazine, The New York Daily News, and Interview Magazine. She is the author of two nonfiction books, "Living at the Edge of the World" - recently adapted theatrically by actress Rachel Morgan, titled "The Most Beautiful High", and mounted for a limited Chicago run in late 2012 - and "Winnie: My Life in the Institution", which was made into an NBC-TV Movie of the Week.

But when I got back to the institution I was still real mad. All I was thinking was, why did he have to go and call me that nasty thing? I said to myself, "I'm gonna set down and write a book. Cause mentally retarded people can't write books, so I'll show Willy just how retarded I am!" And I told everybody I was writing a book, boy, I let everyone know it. Some of the attendants, they teased me, said I thought I was a big shot 'cause I was writing a book.

With the help of journalist Jamie Pastor Bolnick, Winnie tells a story that is both chilling and inspiring, a story that at. .

With the help of journalist Jamie Pastor Bolnick, Winnie tells a story that is both chilling and inspiring, a story that at times sounds unbelievable but is, according to public and medical records and those who knew her best, true.

Jamie Pastor Bolnick. Winnie Sprockett was just six years old in 1938 when she was committed by her stepmother to a state institution for mentally retarded females, where she remained for most of her life. Her parents had died when she was two, and she grew up shunned by most of her remaining family. Despite her isolation and some harsh-and, in a few cases, cruel-treatment, she became a compassionate and generous woman, and among the many remarkable things about her one stands out: She wrote a book-a book that grew to become the one about which you're now reading.

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Jamie Pastor Bolnick is an American writer, journalist, and photographer . Bolnick was born in Huntington, Long Island, New York. She attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York City and began acting professionally while still a teenager. Jamie's current project is a book about the two Port Authority policemen who were the last to be rescued alive from the ruins of the World Trade Center on 9/11, told from their perspectives. The book's working title is 'Recovery'. Winnie: My Life in the Institution – A Memoir of a Special Woman (Paperback), 2007 (forthcoming), Book&Arts Press, ISBN 978-795861-2-5.

Jamie Pastor Bolnick is the author of Winnie: My Life in the Institution, which was made into an NBC-TV movie. Her work has also appeared in magazines and newspapers, including Redbook and Newsday. She lives in New York City with her family. Jamie Pastor Bolnick.

Jamie Pastor Bolnick is the author of Winnie: My Life in the Institution, which was made into an NBC-TV movie view moreJamie Pastor Bolnick is the author of Winnie: My Life in the Institution, which wa.

Jamie Pastor Bolnick is the author of Winnie: My Life in the Institution, which was made into an NBC-TV movie view moreJamie Pastor Bolnick is the author of Winnie: My Life in the Institution, which was made into an NBC-TV movie.

WINNIE: My Life in the Institution. By Jamie Pastor Bolnick. Twenty years ago, a woman who had lived her life in a mental institution wrote a book to prove she wasn't retarded. Of below-average intelligence, Gwynna Sprockett was orphaned as an infant, treated badly by foster parents and committed to an institution at the age of 6. She was brutalized by some of the attendants, but a teacher encouraged her to read and write. She struggled with a mind able to sense its limitations but often incapable of overcoming them. She later died, still in an institution. Winnie Sprockett's voice gives life to this familiar story.

Winnie is a 1988 NBC network television movie which aired on October 10, 1988. The movie is based on the fact-based book "Winnie: My Life in the Institution" written by Jamie Paster Bolnick. David Morse as Thomas. Barbara Barrie as Mrs. Drake. Jenny O'Hara as Miriam. Peggy McCay as Mrs Mckenna. Tabi Cooper as Estelle.

Chronicles the life of a woman who was committed to a state institution at the age of six and who wrote a book in an effort to prove her intelligence
Marad
I had read this book previously but wanted to do so again and could not find it new. When I was finished with my second read this time, I passed it on to a now retired school and family counselor who went on to become a teacher of special needs students on the high school level. I am grateful that book was available and that it arrived so promptly.
Vertokini
Beautifully written!
Rarranere
Note: This review is for the newly released (2010) paperback second edition; I received a free review copy of this book directly from the publisher. You can read a more detailed version of my review for this book on the web site Metapsychology Online Reviews.

The "Winnie" of the title is Winifred (actually Gywnna, as readers come to know later) Sprockett. In 1938, when she was just six years old, Winnie's foster mother told her she was going away. Winnie was forced to leave behind her three older sisters and her dog, and after a very long car ride, she and her foster mother arrived at "the institution" (a state institution for mentally retarded females). In the days that followed, Winnie had to share a room with many other children, wear ill-fitting clothes, take public baths, and have all of her hair cut off. Shortly thereafter, however, Winnie begins to adjust--not only does she make friends, but also she learns basic skills, such as how to dress herself and to brush her teeth. When she turns eight, Winnie also starts to attend the institution's school, where she studies hard in hopes of learning to read and asks her teacher for extra help to improve her speech.

Sadly, visits from Winnie's family were few and far between. And while life in the institution could be difficult--from the conflicts with the other girls to the lack of stimulation to the outright abuse by a few of the attendants--it was all Winnie knew, at least until she was about 30 years old. At that point, she was given a trial in a supervised nursing home placement, and although she briefly enjoyed this new-found freedom, she eventually became overwhelmed and requested to be returned to the institution. Ultimately, Winnie remained institutionalized for her entire life. Prior to her death, however, Winnie wrote a book about her experiences, which she originally titled My Growing Up in the Institution. Unfortunately, Winnie never got to see her book published: she passed away in 1976, at the young age of 44.

This book is based on Winnie's original 28 hand-written pages (excerpts of which are reproduced at the start of each chapter). Author Jamie Pastor Bolnick, who first came to know Winnie as a young girl visiting the institution, spent many hours interviewing Winnie. To write this book, Pastor combined these tape-recorded interviews with Winnie's actual written words and then put everything in the first-person, present-tense format. The resulting pages printed here are, according to Pastor "Winnie's voice and Winnie's story." Given this, I think it may have made more sense for the author's byline to read "By Winnie Sprockett, as told to Jamie Pastor Bolnick," or perhaps "The Story of Winnie Sprockett, edited by Jamie Pastor Bolnick."

In the end, however, this is a compelling, poignant account, especially given the lingering thought that had she been born today, Winnie would probably never have been institutionalized. Does that make Winnie's story a tragic tale? Perhaps, or perhaps, as the dedication suggests, simply one of what might have been.
Xurad
This book is an amazing read. It is eye-opening, heart-wrenching and heart-warming all in one. I have family with "dis"abilities and work with individuals on the spectrum. I was so glad and proud to read a book by such an amazing woman. So many of these individuals have incredible stories, all they need is a voice and someone to listen. This book should be a required reading for high school students in order to help give some perspective and insight into the real thoughts of another REAL PERSON. Everyone needs to understand that they are people too and deserve to be listened to an acknowledged as much as the next person.

Winnie did not need to be given a voice, she was loud enough on her own, she just needed someone to help her be heard. She was lucky enough to find someone like Jamie to help her with that. Thanks to Jamie we all get to hear what Winnie has to say...take the time to listen.

Read this book, give it as a gift, think about what it means.
Washington
I have read this book over and over. It is so well written and the story is out of this world. I wrote my own memiours because of this book and I also started getting kids to visit me from and Orphanage because of this book.It will change your thinking so much.
I love this story!!
Perongafa
If this book doesn't move you, check your pulse. My heart was turned and twisted every page as Winnie told her story. With moments of joy, sorrow, anger, and more times than not disappointment with the way society treated this unfortunate, very human, being. I wish, dear Lord, I wish I could have known her even for one day. How much richer my life would be. I never wanted the book to end. How sad for those who came into her life, even those who gave her life, and never saw her beauty in this world.
Brajind
It was a gift for my sister and she LOVED it!
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