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Going Down to the Barrio: Homeboys and Homegirls in Change ePub download

by Joan Moore

  • Author: Joan Moore
  • ISBN: 087722854X
  • ISBN13: 978-0877228547
  • ePub: 1549 kb | FB2: 1596 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Publisher: Temple University Press; First edition (November 21, 1991)
  • Pages: 181
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 125
  • Format: doc lrf rtf mbr
Going Down to the Barrio: Homeboys and Homegirls in Change ePub download

Home Browse Books Book details, Going down to the Barrio . Both of our barrios are small pieces of an area known generally as East Los Angeles.

Home Browse Books Book details, Going down to the Barrio: Homeboys and Homegirls. Going down to the Barrio: Homeboys and Homegirls in Change. As a sequel to the author's award-winning study, Homeboys (Temple, 1979), this book returns to the same neighborhoods to chart the development of gang behavior, especially in terms of violence and drug use, and to compare experiences of male and female gang members.

This book examines the changes and continuities among three generations of barrio gangs. It explores the neighborhoods to chart the development of gang behavior.

Start by marking Going Down To The Barrio: Homeboys and . This book examines the changes and continuities among three generations of barrio gangs.

Start by marking Going Down To The Barrio: Homeboys and Homegirls in Change as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. It explores the neighborhoods to chart the development of gang behavior, especially in terms of violence and drug use, and to compare experiences of male and female gang members. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia.

Though the book rests primarily on data from one project, it reflects the findings of many previous studies as well. A'" Going Down to the Barrio homeboys and home girls in change. This is a study of two Chicano gangs in East Los Angeles and how they have changed over time. The gangs originated in the 1940s in a climate of hysteria. They continue to operate in a climate of renewed hysteria.

Going Down to the Barr. In this illuminating look at two Chicano gangs in East Los Angeles, Joan W. Moore examines the changes and continuities among three generations of barrio gangs. As a sequel to the author's award-winning study, "Homeboys" (Temple, 1979), this book returns to the same neighborhoods to chart the development of gang behavior, especially in terms of violence and drug use, and In this illuminating look at two Chicano gangs in East Los Angeles, Joan W. Moore examines the changes and continuities among three generations of barrio.

In this illuminating look at two Chicano gangs in East Los Angeles, Joan W.

Joan Willard Moore, American Sociologist, educator.

This book has focused on change in two of Los Angeles’ Chicano neighborhood gangs. We have discovered some very real changes over the years, but also some important continuities in the long history of the two gangs. El Hoyo Maravilla and White Fence are old, long-standing, traditional gangs, with their own norms

In this illuminating look at two Chicano gangs in East Los Angeles, Joan W.

In this illuminating look at two Chicano gangs in East Los Angeles, Joan W. Moore examines the changes and continuities among three generations of barrio gangs. As a sequel to the author's award-winning study, Homeboys (Temple, 1979), this book returns to the same neighborhoods to chart the development of gang behavior, especially in terms of violence and drug use, and to compare experiences of male and female gang members.

In a remarkable research collaborative effort, Moore and gang members worked together to develop an understanding of both male and female gangs and an internal vision of gang members' lives. By using excerpts from individual interviews, the author depicts more about the gangs than simply their life together as a unit; she gives them a voice. Gang members discuss their personal reaction to violence, drug using and selling, family relations and intra-gang dating; they share intimacies that reveal varying levels of loyalty to and dependency on their affiliations, which often become a family substitute.

After maintaining neighborhood ties for 17 years, Moore's research group has established a relationship with these communities that gives her a rare perspective. This is a fascinating and informative book for anyone interested in sociology, criminology, youth behavior and deviance, and ethnic studies.