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Shame and Endurance: The Untold Story of the Chiricahua Apache Prisoners of War ePub download

by H. Henrietta Stockel

  • Author: H. Henrietta Stockel
  • ISBN: 0816524149
  • ISBN13: 978-0816524143
  • ePub: 1143 kb | FB2: 1408 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Publisher: University of Arizona Press (September 1, 2004)
  • Pages: 191
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 156
  • Format: lrf doc lit txt
Shame and Endurance: The Untold Story of the Chiricahua Apache Prisoners of War ePub download

History, Chiricahua Indians - Wars, Chiricahua Indians - Relocation, Chiricahua Indians - Government policy, Chiricahua children - Relocation . Books for People with Print Disabilities.

History, Chiricahua Indians - Wars, Chiricahua Indians - Relocation, Chiricahua Indians - Government policy, Chiricahua children - Relocation, Indians, Treatment of - Oklahoma - Fort Sill, Indians, Treatment of - Florida - Fort Pickens, United States - Politics and government - 19th century, United States - Race relations. Tucson : University of Arizona Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; trent university;. Trent University Library Donation. Internet Archive Books.

Shame and Endurance book. It tells of the Chiricahua Apaches’ 27 years of imprisonment as recorded in American dispatches, reports, and news items: documents that disclose the confusion, contradictions, and raw emotions expressed by government and military officials regarding the Many readers may be familiar with the wartime exploits of the Apaches; this book relates the untold story of their postwar fate.

Many readers may be familiar with the wartime exploits of the Apaches; this book relates the untold story of their postwar fate.

Shame and Endurance : The Untold Story of the Chiricahua Apache Prisoners of War. by H. Henrietta Stockel. Many readers may be familiar with the wartime exploits of the Apaches; this book relates the untold story of their postwar fate.

Henrietta Stockel is the author of several books about the Chiricahua Apaches and other Native Americans. She is co-founder and former executive director of the Albuquerque Indian Center and currently teaches the ethnohistory of the Chiricahua Apaches at Cochise College in Sierra Vista, Arizona. H. Henrietta Stockel (1 Titles). The Untold Story of the Chiricahua Apache Prisoners of War. View Book. The University of Arizona Press publishes the work of leading scholars from around the globe.

The Chiricahua, one of seven tribes of the Apache Nation, were considered at the time to be the most violent and dangerous of all Native Americans on the frontier and were pursued relentlessly in the mountainous regions of New Mexico and Arizona. After surrendering to the Army in 1866, the Apache warriors and their families were relocated from their tribal homelands to St. Petersburg, Florida. In 1887, they were sent to southeast Alabama. There, within 8 years, nearly half of them perished from diseases to which they had no immunity.

Stockel, H. Henrietta (2004). Shame and Endurance: The Untold Story of the Chiricahua Apache Prisoners of War. Tucson, Arizona: University of Arizona Press. ISBN 978-0-8165-2414-3. Scott, Hugh L. (2016). Hugh Lenox Scott Remembers Indian Country. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press.

Author of 11 books, mainly about Chiricahua Apache history and culture, including events affecting Cochise and Geronimo. Shame and Endurance: The Untold Story of the Chiricahua Apache Prisoners of War Sep 1, 2004. The 12rh book is in press - interviews with contemporary Apaches about their lives on and off the reservation. Live among the Apache people in southcentral NM. Am founder of a local writers' group, university and college teacher, and personal friend to many Apaches.

Geronimo Surrenders – The 1886 . .

In Shame & Endurance: The Untold Story of the Chiricahua Apache Prisoners of War, Stockel chronicles the difficult fate of Geronimo's Apaches after they surrendered to the . They and their families were removed from tribal lands in the southwest and relocated first to Florida and then to Alabama. Almost half of them died within a few years, succumbing to infectious diseases. Many of the children were sent to Indian schools in Pennsylvania. Not until 1894, after intense pressure from lobbyists and activists, were the surviving 260 prisoners relocated to Oklahoma.

January 2005 · The Journal of Military History. The subtitle is misleading, since Stockel herself told the story in Survival of the Spirit: Chiricahua Apaches in Captivity (Reno: University of Nevada Press, 1993), a book over 120 pages longer than her latest work.

Many readers may be familiar with the wartime exploits of the Apaches; this book relates the untold story of their postwar fate. It tells of the Chiricahua Apaches’ 27 years of imprisonment as recorded in American dispatches, reports, and news items: documents that disclose the confusion, contradictions, and raw emotions expressed by government and military officials regarding the Apaches while revealing the shameful circumstances in which they were held. First removed from Arizona to Florida, the prisoners were eventually relocated to Mount Vernon Barracks in Alabama, where, in the words of one Apache, "We didn’t know what misery was until they dumped us in those swamps." Pulmonary disease took its toll—by 1894, disease had killed nearly half of the Apaches—and after years of pressure from Indian rights activists and bureaucratic haggling, Fort Sill in Oklahoma was chosen as a more healthful location. Here they were given the opportunity to farm, and here Geronimo, who eventually converted to Christianity, died of pneumonia in 1909 at the age of 89, still a prisoner of war. In the meantime, many Apache children had been removed to Carlisle, Pennsylvania, for education—despite earlier promises that families would not be split up—and most eventually lost their cultural identity. Henrietta Stockel has combed public records to reconstruct this story of American shame and Native endurance. Unabashedly speaking on behalf of the Apaches, she has framed these documents within a readable narrative to show how exasperated public officials, eager to openly demonstrate their superiority over "savages" who had successfully challenged the American military for years, had little sympathy for the consequences of their confinement. Although the Chiricahua Apaches were not alone in losing their ancestral homelands, they were the only American Indians imprisoned for so long a time in an environment that continually exposed them to illnesses against which they had no immunity, devastating families even more than warfare. Shame and Endurance records events that ought never to be repeated—and tells a story that should never be forgotten.
Hunaya
This Book is like an open Book: You can find most information splintered over different books, but to read all this information in one Book is a historical achievement at a high level. Her writing is precise and meticulous with wide variety of documentary resources.

George Damme, The Netherlands
Kulasius
It's the story of the treatment of a once proud people AFTER they surrendered and what they had to endure to survive. The author uses the Apaches and the U.S. governments own words from documented records to tell the real story of how the process of erasing a culture took place. But the book also show the resilience of the Apace people to endure and survive despite the governments attempt to scatter and relocate to desolate areas with unfulfilled promises of proper living conditions.
Tygralbine
The author seems intent on portraying the Apache people as pitiful, helpless individuals. There is much more to the story which could be told from a more positive perspective.

Bud Shapard
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