» » It Could Always Be Worse: A Yiddish Folk Tale

It Could Always Be Worse: A Yiddish Folk Tale ePub download

by Margot Zemach

  • Author: Margot Zemach
  • ISBN: 0374336504
  • ISBN13: 978-0374336509
  • ePub: 1922 kb | FB2: 1241 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Social Sciences
  • Publisher: Farrar Straus & Giroux (April 1, 1990)
  • Pages: 32
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 741
  • Format: lit azw lrf docx
It Could Always Be Worse: A Yiddish Folk Tale ePub download

Mar 05, 2016 Samantha Williamson rated it it was amazing. It Could Always Be Worse, is a Yiddish folktale adapted by Margot Zemach.

The structure of the two stories are basically the same. Of course I have to love the one I grew up with more and look at this one as a h wanna-be. ) But I did enjoy the story and the lesson it teaches. Mar 05, 2016 Samantha Williamson rated it it was amazing. It’s a humorous story that teaches an important lesson. In the story, a poor man is upset by his crowded, noisy, living conditions.

quarters in this Yiddish folktale; Zemach's exuberantly chaotic illustrations earned her a Caldecott Honor. I was born with a disability and have been through a lot of surgeries and I find that as a grown adult, I’m constantly muttering to myself It could always be worse

A wise rabbi doles out surprising advice to a man complaining of overcrowded quarters in this Yiddish folktale; Zemach's exuberantly chaotic illustrations earned her a Caldecott Honor. I was born with a disability and have been through a lot of surgeries and I find that as a grown adult, I’m constantly muttering to myself It could always be worse. It sounds silly to say, but this book has had a tremendously positive impact on my entire life! However, it’s a good story for EVERYONE, even if your life is mostly void of struggles.

A Yiddish version of an old tale with colorful, humorous. Caldecott Honor Book, 1978. Extremely narrow margins. As he follows the Rabbi's unlikely advice, the poor man's life goes from bad to worse, with increasingly uproarious results. In his little hut, silly calamity follows foolish catastrophe, all memorably depicted in full-color illustrations that are both funnier and lovelier than any this distinguished artist has done in the past.

In this retelling of a classic Yiddish tale, the poor protagonist visits the local Rabbi with a complaint. This timeless tale is set long ago in a crowded city. A peasant seeking spiritual relief from the misery of his struggling household seeks help of the rabbi. The sagacious cleric, in an ironic twist, shows the man that expectations are all relative!This book is wonderful for reading to individual kids, but it also serves very well in religious education to preschoolers across all faiths.

Written and Illustrated by Margot Zemach. A poor man lives with his wife, mother, and six children in a crowded one-room hut. The children fight and the man argues with his wife. Leveled Reading Passage: The Camel and the Pig (Medium).

Margot Zemach; Pictures by the author. Caldecott Honor Book. Connect with the author.

When the poor man was unable to stand it any longer, he ran to the Rabbi for help

In his little hut, silly calamity follows foolish catastrophe, all memorably depicted in full-color illustrations that are both funnier and lovelier than any this distinguished artist has done in the past. com/?book 0374436363 Same great deal with amazing new steals! We have added thousands of books to our CLEARANCE SALE! Go check it out and see what great deals you can find! Books

Margot Zemach (November 30, 1931 – May 21, 1989) was an American illustrator of more than forty children's books, some of which she also wrote.

Margot Zemach (November 30, 1931 – May 21, 1989) was an American illustrator of more than forty children's books, some of which she also wrote. Many were adaptations of folk tales from around the world, especially Yiddish and other Eastern European stories. She and her husband Harvey Fischtrom, writing as Harve Zemach, collaborated on several picture books including Duffy and the Devil for which she won the 1974 Caldecott Medal.

Unable to stand his overcrowded and noisy home any longer, a poor man goes to the Rabbi for advice.
felt boot
The story and pictures part of the book are fine. It's a great story. However, the book was not properly cut at the manufacturer's. About ¼ inch of the top of the cover is white with random colored strips rather than just the front panel image. I had to separate every page of the book by cutting the top with a sharp knife.
It would make a poor gift presentation but I bought it for my grandkids and they won't even notice. They look at the pictures, not technical deficiencies.
I'm only posting this as a heads up to anyone wanting to buy it as a gift. I probably could have returned it but what's the point: It could always be worse! ;)
Dobpota
It may be considered a humorous story, but makes me consider when I think life isn't going well, and who doesn't wish for it to be better, that it could always be worse. I remember to be thankful that I do have life good enough to be able to help out some who really do need life to be just a little bit better.
Stylish Monkey
I have a grandchild hope chest. I am very selective about what goes into it. This book along with "I Love You Forever" are the first 2 books to make the cut. I loved it with my kids and I love it well into the future...
uspeh
"It could always be worse" is an old Yiddish folk tale, marvelously re-told by Margot Zemach. I used to hear this tale from my grandmother and it has long become part of the Eastern European Jewry' folklore. I now had an opportunity to share this funny tale with my child and he absolutely loved it. The book's design is wonderful and prompts questions about how Jews really lived in the Pale. Also, great emphasis on the rabbi's influence on the community's everyday life. My personal question was why the rabbi was called "Holy Rabbi."
Simple fellow
Why are there not six stars? I love this book. The drawings are darling and the story is good for the whole family. I bought it to help one of my children stop complaining so much about how so-and-so has it better. It turns out that I am being blessed by the perspective in the book as well! The father in the book is given instructions by his rabbi that make his life increasingly terrible, but ultimately the man learns that our comfort and appreciation is often relative. By focusing on how good we have it compared to how bad it could be, it is easy to see life's blesings.
Fearlessdweller
This was my favorite book as a child. My dad would read it with different voices and it was the best! I was born with a disability and have been through a lot of surgeries and I find that as a grown adult, I’m constantly muttering to myself “It could always be worse”. It sounds silly to say, but this book has had a tremendously positive impact on my entire life! However, it’s a good story for EVERYONE, even if your life is mostly void of struggles.
Kegal
I use this as a great "lesson" book. ITs great for kids, its great for parents or anyone as a great story to help someone cope with the feeling of being overwhelmed. Great for any age. My daughter used it in her phd class to prove a point, and I bought her a copy. I have bought several in my life for just the right moments.
Bought 2 for adult gifts both pastors. They deal with a lot of us who grumble about simple things.
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