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Ike the Soldier ePub download

by Merle Miller

  • Author: Merle Miller
  • ISBN: 0399132015
  • ISBN13: 978-0399132018
  • ePub: 1762 kb | FB2: 1308 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Politics & Government
  • Publisher: G.P. Putnam's Sons; First Edition edition (November 10, 1987)
  • Pages: 859
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 908
  • Format: mobi lrf doc txt
Ike the Soldier ePub download

Merle Dale Miller (May 17, 1919 – June 10, 1986) was an American writer, novelist, and author who is perhaps best remembered for his best-selling biography of Harry S. Truman, and as a pioneer in the gay rights movement.

Merle Dale Miller (May 17, 1919 – June 10, 1986) was an American writer, novelist, and author who is perhaps best remembered for his best-selling biography of Harry S. Miller came out of the closet in an article in the New York Times Magazine on January 17, 1971, titled "What It Means to Be a Homosexual". The response of over 2,000 letters to the article (more than ever received by that newspaper) led to a book publication later that year.

Ike the Soldier Hardcover – November 10, 1987. This was Merle Miller's last biography before he died, and he ended his writing career on a very fine note with this volume about Dwight D. Eisenhower's military career. by. Merle Miller (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. It's unfortunate that the book cannot cover his presidential years, which were equally vital to the history of our nation and the world. However, what Miller covers in this book is outstanding - Ike's life from birth to V-E Day. The detail is immense, the analysis thoughtful, the anecdotes fascinating.

Bringing together thousands of hours of interviews with the men and women who were closest to him, Merle Miller has constructed a revealing and personal biography of the man who would become the supreme commander. From his childhood in Kansas to West Point, World War I, and Europe where he led the Allied Forces to a hard-won victory in World War II, Ike the Soldier goes behind the historic battles and into the heart and mind of Ike Eisenhower. Miller has crafted the defining biography on the life of the thirty-fourth president, bringing more depth to the man many thought they knew.

Ike the Soldier book. Merle Miller, born in Montour, Iowa, wrote almost a dozen books, including more than half a dozen novels. His first, ''That Winter'' (1948), was considered one of the best novels about the postwar readjustment of World War II veterans. His other novels included ''A Day in Late September,'' set in suburban Connecticut on a Sunday in September 1960, ''The Sure Thing,'' ''Reunion,'' and his Merle Miller, born in Montour, Iowa, wrote almost a dozen books, including more than half a dozen novels.

Ike the Soldier : As They Knew Him. by Merle Miller. Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780399514838.

By the late author of Plain Speaking: An Oral Biography of Harry S. Truman, this 896-page volume explores the kind of man Eisenhower was and how he developed as he did. Working with newly mined anecdotes and unpublished papers, Miller concentrates on the formation of Ike's character in his youth and then shows him in action.

Miller, Merle, 1919-1986. Eisenhower, Dwight D. (Dwight David), 1890-1969, United States. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by LineK on January 27, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Written by Merle Miller, Audiobook narrated by Peter Berkrot. Called a great book worthy of a great man, this definitive biography of the Commander in Chief of the Pacific Fleet in World War II is considered the best book ever written about Admiral Chester W. Nimitz. Highly respected by both the civilian and naval communities, Nimitz was sometimes overshadowed by more colorful warriors in the Pacific such as MacArthur and Halsey.

Miller even managed to uncover some new material, most notably perhaps, Ike's letters to his boyhood love, Gladys Harding

Miller even managed to uncover some new material, most notably perhaps, Ike's letters to his boyhood love, Gladys Harding. On the subject of Eisenhower's alleged affair with Kay Summersby, however, the author is noncommital to the point of reticence. A monumental (896-page) but vivid and consistently absorbing record of Dwight D. Eisenhower's military career; from an author who had a genuine flair for putting latter-day notables in human perspective. Miller (Plain Speaking; Lyndon) spent five years on the text, which was completed shortly before his death last year.

Merle Miller was born on May 17, 1919 in Montour, Iowa, and grew up in. .

Merle Miller was born on May 17, 1919 in Montour, Iowa, and grew up in Marshalltown, Iowa. He attended the University of Iowa and the London School of Economics. His best-known books are his biographies of three presidents: Plain Speaking: An Oral History of Harry Truman, Lyndon: An Oral Biography, and Ike the Soldier: As They Knew Him. His novels include That Winter, The Sure Thing, Reunion, A Secret Understanding, A Gay and Melancholy Sound, What Happened, Island 49, and A Day in Late September.

Based on interviews with Dwight D. Eisenhower's closest associates, this biography follows Ike from his Kansas childhood to his station as Supreme Allied Commander during World War II
Lucam
Excellent, if a bit long - but necessarily so. A niece happened to see this book on my end table, and I was surprised that she was surprised to discover that Eisenhower had a military career before his presidency. What little she's learned of Ike in school has been confined to his relatively inconsequential presidential years. It's dismaying that his WWII accomplishments seem to be taken for granted now, as if victory over Hitler was a foregone conclusion, when it was anything but, especially early on. This collection of accounts by Ike's contemporaries reminds us what a massive challenge the Supreme Allied Commander faced, not only tactically, but politically. The fact that he managed to coordinate the war effort *and* keep Patton and Montgomery from killing each other is remarkable in and of itself. Recommended, especially for those of a certain (tender) age who assume that Ike came out of nowhere in 1952 to live in the White House and play golf for 8 years.
Fordredor
Tremendous service. The book was exactly as described. A pleasure to do business with. I highly recommend.
Flash_back
This was Merle Miller's last biography before he died, and he ended his writing career on a very fine note with this volume about Dwight D. Eisenhower's military career. It's unfortunate that the book cannot cover his presidential years, which were equally vital to the history of our nation and the world.

However, what Miller covers in this book is outstanding -- Ike's life from birth to V-E Day. The detail is immense, the analysis thoughtful, the anecdotes fascinating. Ike's character and his evolution come through -- his increasing ability to manage the fractious egos of his subordinates, his gaining self-confidence, his grasp of the morale of the common soldiers he commanded.

As he advanced in rank and life, he became more able to sack or rein in subordinates, for example. His relief of Lloyd Fredendall for gross incompetence at Kasserine is far less harsh than his sacking of a West Point classmate, Henry Miller, in early 1944, for blurting out critical D-Day secrets at a London party, for example.

Eisenhower also showed ample understanding of what World War II in Europe was about when he visited his "first horror camp" at Ohrdruf. He went through "every nook and cranny of the camp" so that he could report on it to the world. He then requested American and British politicians to see these camps, Allied troops visit them, and German civilians walk through them, so that nobody could deny "60 years later" that these atrocities had happened. Ike was very prescient there -- he knew that decades later, racists and Hitler adherents would seek to minimize and deny the Nazi atrocities and genocide.

The book also shows us other sides of Eisenhower -- the warm man behind the infectious grin, who enjoyed baseball and football. There are anecdotes about how near his death, he only wanted to talk about West Point and the teams, for example. There are stories about his close relationship with his son, John S.D. Eisenhower, a serving Army officer who graduated from West Point on June 5, 1944, served under his father, and became a fine historian in his own right. Miller notes that one of Ike's main demands on his staff was loyalty. When PR chief Harry Butcher published his own diary of serving with Eisenhower, which made all kinds of sarcastic attacks on anyone but Ike, the general was furious -- he saw the book as a betrayal of confidences, and cut Butcher off.

Indeed, Eisenhower was quite clear in his relations with his staff -- you could insult someone for their behavior, but not their ethnicity. That was critical in keeping harmony in the first successful modern joint national command, where Britons commanded Americans and vice versa. Despite the periodic arguments (mostly for the record) between Britons and Americans over the next big move, Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force was the model for NATO and all future joint commands. That was also Ike's legacy to history.

There is considerable weight given to the tiresome subject: did Ike have an affair with his Irish chauffeur, Kay Summersby. Miller's verdict on this issue: Summersby provided Eisenhower with warmth and personal friendship but probably did not share his bed.

Perhaps the most moving segment of the book does not come from Ike himself, but from his son John, referring to Bill Mauldin and a cartoon the iconoclastic former sergeant drew when the general died in 1969. It showed a US Military Cemetery, presumably somewhere in Europe, with the rows of crosses, and a simple caption, a voice saying, "It's Ike himself. Pass the word."

When John Eisenhower saw the cartoon, he saw its point immediately, and retreated to his study, moved to tears. The cartoon, Miller's description of it, and its use in the book, says so much about Eisenhower and how his men saw him, and exemplifies perfectly the title and theme of the book: "Ike the Soldier: As They Knew Him."

Most highly recommended.
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