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Unpeople: Victims of British Policy ePub download

by Mark Curtis

  • Author: Mark Curtis
  • ISBN: 0099469723
  • ISBN13: 978-0099469728
  • ePub: 1137 kb | FB2: 1288 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Politics & Government
  • Publisher: Vintage Books (December 28, 2004)
  • Pages: 400
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 267
  • Format: rtf mbr docx lit
Unpeople: Victims of British Policy ePub download

Mark Curtis introduces the concept of "Unpeople" ― those whose lives have been deemed expendable, worthless.

Mark Curtis introduces the concept of "Unpeople" ― those whose lives have been deemed expendable, worthless.

In his ground-breaking new book, Mark Curtis reveals the secret history of British collusion with . Similar British policies continue today in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Unpeople: Britain’s Secret Human Rights Abuses.

In his ground-breaking new book, Mark Curtis reveals the secret history of British collusion with radical Islamic and terrorist groups. Curtis shows that Britain is complicit in the deaths of ten million people since 1945.

Город: Oxford, EnglandПодписчиков: 40 ты. себе: on UK foreign polic. себе: on UK foreign policy. Books include Secret Affairs, Web of Deceit, Unpeople, The Great Deception.

The principal victims of British policies are Unpeople – those whose lives are deemed worthless, expendable in the pursuit of power and commercial gain.

Mark Curtis is a British historian and journalist who has been involved with developmental charities

Mark Curtis is a British historian and journalist who has been involved with developmental charities. He is a former director of the World Development Movement.

Unpeople Quotes Showing 1-1 of 1. The principle victims of British policies are Unpeople-those whose lives are deemed worthless, expendable in the pursuit of power and commercial gain

Unpeople Quotes Showing 1-1 of 1. The principle victims of British policies are Unpeople-those whose lives are deemed worthless, expendable in the pursuit of power and commercial gain. They are the modern equivalent of the ‘savages’ of colonial days, who could be mown down by British guns in virtual secrecy, or else in circumstances where the perpetrators were hailed as the upholders of civilisation. Mark Curtis, Unpeople: Britain's Secret Human Rights Abuses.

In Unpeople, Mark Curtis shows that the Blair government is deepening its support for many states promoting terrorism and, using evidence unearthed from formerly secret documents, reveals for the first time the hidden history of unethical British policies, including: support for th. .

In Unpeople, Mark Curtis shows that the Blair government is deepening its support for many states promoting terrorism and, using evidence unearthed from formerly secret documents, reveals for the first time the hidden history of unethical British policies, including: support for the massacres in Iraq in 1963; the extraordinary private backing of the US in its aggression against Vietnam; support for the rise.

Victims of British Policy. Published December 28, 2004 by Vintage Books.

The overseas book value of British invest-ments was £2,000 million. The overseas book value of British invest-ments was £2,000 million.

Mark Curtis introduces the concept of "Unpeople" ― those whose lives have been deemed expendable, worthless, in the pursuit of foreign policy objectives. The book is based on new revelations from declassified government documents.

Gralsa
From an American point of view what really disturbed me was the enabling that goes on between the U.S. and Great Britain. Mr. Curtis goes into some detail about the role Britain played in legitimizing and containing world condemnation for America's war in Vietnam. Although the British policy makers knew that this war was a lost cause, and knew of some of the U.S. military's more nefarious policies they still shielded the U.S. from as much criticism as they could.

For those of us here in the U.S. hoping that Britain could become a voice of reason, this book does not do much to nurture that hope. I was surprised when Curtis writes about how British foreign policy seems to be run by elites much like here in the U.S. Foreign policy is not subject to the will of the people, but instead is hidden from the public. It seems that whichever political party is in charge the direction of foreign policy rarely changes much.

The most frightening aspect of the book is how media is becoming more consolidated. Media is such an essential element for any democracy that this trend is perhaps the biggest threat to our freedoms than any terrorist or rogue state out there. As the media becomes more and more consolidated, the easier it will be to manipulate our information and thus the people. Reading that the British media is following the same trends as media here in the U.S. is a frightening prospect.

The British government's arms deals with the Ugandan dictator Idi Amin is another similarity between the U.S. and every other country with a highly developed military industrial complex. When a large portion of government revenue comes from exporting materials used for war or murder how can that nation ever be an honest broker for peace? When large sectors of an economy of any country is devoted entirely too military arms what will be that country's main export peace or war? We in the industrialized must make the tough decisions about whether we are willing to keep our enormous wealth even if that means we continue to export death and destruction to those less fortunate nations.

I believe one has to work to change his/her own home before they should criticize someone else's, and I did not read this book looking to criticize British policy, but instead I wanted to learn what kind of help the U.S.'s biggest ally might be in curbing our aggressive policies. In this regard, I found Mr. Curtis's book to be rather disappointing. It's very disturbing when you look at a country's polls and see that policy is in direct contradiction to what the people want. When a nation's foreign policy is not subject to its citizens or humanitarian standards then will that country ever be an honest defender of human rights or ever have the moral authority to demand morality from any other nation?

Until we the people arm ourselves with this knowledge and demand that our governments behave humanely these policy makers will be able to export death in our names. Like it or not, we all share responsibility for what our governments do.
Garr
Whilst my main reading interests lie firmly in crime fiction, I do like to read a bit of non-fiction now away, whether it's memoirs, history, politics or social commentary. Last year I read about 13 non-fiction books, this year Unpeople was only the second after Dominic Streatfeild's Cocaine back in January. Unpeople has been in the car for months and months now, and probably due to the subject matter didn't really lend itself to dipping in and dipping out whenever I had those 10 spare minutes while waiting for my better half to finish work or during a waiting period on my Taxi-Dad duties.

In the end irritated by the lack of progress with the book, I decided to just get stuck in and read it. I'm not too interested in spouting my political views or engaging in a debate over successive British government's foreign policies, I`d rather chat about whether or not I should read a few Golden Age Mysteries or stick to my current diet of crime.
Unpeople was interesting enough. There were some examples of some British policies and interventions that occurred in the post-war years that I was unaware of. More recent examples, such as Iraq and Afghanistan; well you would probably have to be living in a cave in Pakistan to remain unaware of these.

The author obviously has an agenda and whilst all his examples are supported by the evidence presented, after a while it just wearied me. Governments do awful things in the name of national interest and security and it would be difficult to consider some of the policies discussed objectively and condone the actions taken. Would the world be a different place if different decisions and policies had been made and followed? Would the death toll have been less in Iraq, in Chile, in Nigeria or in Uganda? Maybe.

I suppose the saddest fact is that so much of what is decided goes unnoticed or unchallenged with little debate in parliament or by the press. Iraq probably being the exception. I'm probably a little bit more naive than I had previously reckoned, unaware of the regularity with which Prime Ministers lied to the House of Commons.

When I was younger, I used to think that voting for one party or another made a difference; Unpeople confirms my latter-acquired cynicism that there is little to choose between the parties at least in respect of foreign policy. Government has decided that a life in Africa, or Asia or South America has less value than big business. and the balance of payments.

Unpeople rated a 3 from 5.

Acquired second hand from a local charity shop earlier in the year.
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