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Al-Qaeda's Armies: Middle East Affiliate Groups The Next Generation of Terror ePub download

by Dennis Ross,Jonathan Schanzer

  • Author: Dennis Ross,Jonathan Schanzer
  • ISBN: 156171884X
  • ISBN13: 978-1561718849
  • ePub: 1131 kb | FB2: 1428 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Politics & Government
  • Publisher: S.P.I. Books; First Edition edition (September 1, 2001)
  • Pages: 222
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 430
  • Format: lrf lit txt rtf
Al-Qaeda's Armies: Middle East Affiliate Groups  The Next Generation of Terror ePub download

These affiliates, Schanzer argues, represent the next generation of the global terrorist threat or stated differently, Al-Qaeda .

Additionally, affiliates "communicate with Al-Qaeda's command structure. These affiliates, Schanzer argues, represent the next generation of the global terrorist threat or stated differently, Al-Qaeda .

18 Jonathan Schanzer. In keeping with its resolve to promote stronger ties with Middle Eastern states, the .

By Ambassador Dennis Ross Director, The Washington Institute for Near East Policy. 18 Jonathan Schanzer. can work to build more robust relationships with states willing to fight their local al-Qaeda affiliates and to help stabilize the problematic areas under their sovereignty.

Al-Qaeda's Armies book. With its leadership tier significantly beheaded by the .  . Detailing the ties of these groups to Osama bin Ladens network of terror, Jonathan Schanzer examines the history and ideology of individual affiliates that hold current and future significance for Western interests. For example, Schanzer addresses the history and challenges posed by Ansar al-Islam, an al Qaeada affiliate based in northern Iraq, implicated in numerous attacks against .

Al-Qaeda still threatens the West despite the fact that thousands of its fighters have been killed or captured. Fighting affiliate groups will likely be the next challenge in the war on terror

Al-Qaeda still threatens the West despite the fact that thousands of its fighters have been killed or captured. The terror network’s resiliency lies in the existence of "affiliate groups. Numbering more than two-dozen worldwide, these groups maintain operatives from al-Qaeda’s training camps and battlefields. Fighting affiliate groups will likely be the next challenge in the war on terror. Schanzer provides a field guide to al-Qaeda’s Middle East armies and explores what it will take to successfully combat them.

Schanzer provides a field guide to al-Qaeda’s Middle East armies and explores what it will take to successfully . Al-Qaeda still threatens the West despite the fact that thousands of its fighters have been killed or captured

Schanzer provides a field guide to al-Qaeda’s Middle East armies and explores what it will take to successfully combat them. Al-Qaeda still threatens the West despite the fact that thousands of its fighters have been killed or captured. The terror network’s resiliency lies in the existence of affiliate groups. They are local and autonomous, but fight in the name of al-Qaeda’s global jihad.

These affiliates, Schanzer argues, represent the next generation of the global terrorist threat or stated differently, Al-Qaeda .

Al-Qaeda's Armies: Middle East Affiliate Groups & The Next Generation of Terror", Washington Institute for Near . Hamas vs. Fatah: The Struggle For Palestine (9780230609051): Jonathan Schanzer, Daniel Pipes: Books". Retrieved 2011-05-23.

Al-Qaeda's Armies: Middle East Affiliate Groups & The Next Generation of Terror", Washington Institute for Near East Policy (October 1, 2004) References.

Al-Qaeda’s Armies: Middle East Affiliate Groups and the Next Generation of Terror (Washington Institute for Near East . Jonathan has studied Middle East history in four countries. He earned his PhD from King’s College London, where he wrote his dissertation on the .

Al-Qaeda’s Armies: Middle East Affiliate Groups and the Next Generation of Terror (Washington Institute for Near East Policy 2004) was the first to explore the al-Qaeda franchises of the Middle East. Jonathan testifies often before Congress and publishes widely in the American and international media. Congress and its efforts to combat terrorism in the 20th century. He speaks Arabic and Hebrew.

Al-Qaeda's Armies: Middle East Affiliate Groups & The Next Generation of Terror", Washington Institute for Near East Policy (October 1, 2004). "Foundation for Defense of Democracies".

Al-Qaeda's Armies: Middle East Affiliate Groups & The Next Generation of Terror. Jonathan Schanzer, Dennis Ross. Exposes the most significant terrorist threats from the world's most dangerous terror group and its affiliates; The first in a series of select co-publications between SPI Press and The Washingto. More).

Al-Qaeda still threatens the West despite the fact that thousands of its fighters have been killed or captured. Attacks continue, even as Usama bin Laden and his top lieutenants hide in distant caves. The terror network’s resiliency lies in the existence of "affiliate groups." Numbering more than two-dozen worldwide, these groups maintain operatives from al-Qaeda’s training camps and battlefields. They are local and autonomous, but fight in the name of al-Qaeda’s global jihad.

Using never-before published material, Arabic language sources, and personal interviews from the Middle East, Schanzer examines affiliates in Egypt, Lebanon, Algeria, Yemen and Iraq. The author also shares research from a fact-finding mission in Iraq, where he interviewed al-Qaeda fighters and one of Saddam Hussein’s former intelligence officers.

Fighting affiliate groups will likely be the next challenge in the war on terror. Schanzer provides a field guide to al-Qaeda’s Middle East armies and explores what it will take to successfully combat them.

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Al-Qaeda's Armies, in which this reviewer is thanked in the acknowledgments, surveys the most notorious affiliates of Al-Qaeda in the Middle East by which Schanzer means "homegrown, organic Islamist terror groups with nationalist objectives" that have been trained by Al-Qaeda in Afghanistan and elsewhere. Additionally, affiliates "communicate with Al-Qaeda's command structure ... share Al-Qaeda's ascetic and militant approach to the implementation of Islamic law, and their shared goal of world Islamic dominance."

Following September 11, 2001, Al-Qaeda metastasized from a hierarchal and centralized organization into a decentralized movement; Schanzer explains how it adjusted to this new reality by relying to a large degree on the infrastructure of surviving affiliate groups. These affiliates, Schanzer argues, represent the next generation of the global terrorist threat or stated differently, Al-Qaeda 2.0. Schanzer predicts that "affiliates will increasingly constitute Al-Qaeda's outer perimeter and the pools from which new terrorists can be drawn."

He provides exceptional perspective on affiliates in Egypt, Lebanon, Yemen, Algeria, and northern Iraq. Additionally, the book includes information on their evolution, their activities, and offers a convincing strategy for the United States and its allies to deal with this menace. Often overlooked because of their small size and because they operate in areas outside the reach of state authority, the affiliates' activities should sound alarm bells in Western capitals. To defeat Al-Qaeda requires a two-pronged approach: hunting the central leadership and the affiliates.

Undertaking a strategy of combating affiliates would certainly yield much needed victories against Al-Qaeda. With troops in two theatres of war-Afghanistan and Iraq-the United States ought to consider small-scale operations against affiliates, which "may prove a less complicated, less time consuming, and less expensive mode of fighting terrorism," Schanzer argues. By their nature, these operations would require the support of Muslim governments. Convincing these-an unlikely prospect under the best of circumstances-would demonstrate to Al-Qaeda and other jihadis that the West and the Muslim world alike consider them pariahs. Schanzer also posits that this would begin the real battle: the battle between moderate Islam and radicals.

Avi Jorisch

Foundation for the Defense of Democracies
Dianaghma
Bringing back "cut and run" - bad choice of mantras for Schanzer. Oh brother...watched this guy on C-Span brainwashing some impressionable youngsters at the Student's Conference of the "Young America Foundation". He claims there was a cut and run pattern in Lebanon, Iran, Somalia, etc, and his point is that we shouldn't cut and run in Iraq. He doesn't address whether we shouldn't have been in any of those conflicts to begin with - nobody like him even leaves that as an option - he builds into his argument that conflict is assumed. He dismisses the possibility that the reason for "cutting and running" was that the US government got into conflicts the US people never wanted. If you "buy" this book, please just forget we first quartered troops in their neighborhoods, not the other way around...then they finally attacked us on our soil after tens, hundreds of thousands of THEIR deaths prior. Just another chickenhawk neocon AIPAC crony pulling us into something we never asked for, and don't want.
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