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The Second Plane: September 11: Terror and Boredom (Vintage International) ePub download

by Martin Amis

  • Author: Martin Amis
  • ISBN: 1400096006
  • ISBN13: 978-1400096008
  • ePub: 1976 kb | FB2: 1261 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Politics & Government
  • Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (April 7, 2009)
  • Pages: 224
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 272
  • Format: lit docx lrf mobi
The Second Plane: September 11: Terror and Boredom (Vintage International) ePub download

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and the duplication on his own body of the injuries sustained by his alter ego in constant assassination attempts.

The Second Plane: September 11: Terror and Boredom. At the end of the author's note that prefaces this brilliant collection, Martin Amis asks of extremism: "Where are its gifts to humanity? Where are its works?" These are rhetorical questions, of course. Religious extremists are more likely to fly planes into buildings or carry bombs onto buses than to write a novel worth reading or curate an exhibition worth seeing, or carry out a life-saving operation or discover a new treatment for cancer. The positive contributions of pure religion are as thin on the ground as the remains of the twin towers.

The Second Plane : September 11: Terror and Boredom. Vintage International. By (author) Martin Amis. Free delivery worldwide. Martin Amis's best sellers include the novels Money, London Fields, and The Information, as well as his memoir, Experience.

In The Second Plane, his collection of noisy, knowing writings about theocracy and terror, Martin Amis goes . But he appears to believe that an insult is an analysis.

In The Second Plane, his collection of noisy, knowing writings about theocracy and terror, Martin Amis goes out on a limb. He hates Islamism and he hates Islamist murder. And so he should: if certain forms of evil are not hated, then they have not been fully understood. Amis enjoys the moral element in contempt, and he is splendidly unperturbed by the prospect of giving offense.

This is an incomplete list of books about the September 11 attacks. In the first 10 years since the September 11, 2001 attacks, dozens of books were published that focus specifically on the topic or on subtopics such as just the attacks on World Trade Towers in New York City, and more have been published since. A number of publications have released their own rankings of books about 9-11. The Guardian, in September 2011, provided a listing by three panelists of what they felt to be the 20 best.

September 11: Terror and Boredom. About The Second Plane. Part of Vintage International. Category: Domestic Politics. Category: Nonfiction. A master not only of fiction but also of fiercely controversial political engagement, Martin Amis here gathers fourteen pieces that constitute an evolving, provocative, and insightful examination of the most momentous event of our time. At the heart of this collection is the long essay Terror and Boredom, an unsparing analysis of Islamic fundamentalism and the West’s flummoxed response to it, while.

September 11: Terror and Boredom, 93–122. The Moronic Inferno and Other Visits to America. London: Penguin Books. New York: Vintage International. Visiting Mrs Nabokov and Other Excursions. Ashcroft, Bill, Gareth Griffiths, and Helen Tiffin. Key Concepts in Post-Colonial Studies.

A master not only of fiction but also of fiercely controversial political engagement, Martin Amis here gathers fourteen. You're getting the VIP treatment! With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items. Your Shopping Cart is empty. There are currently no items in your Shopping Cart.

The Second Plane September 11: Terror and Boredom. September 11 Consciousness. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 11 years ago. Martin Amis's political books have typically been the least well received of his oeuvre

The Second Plane September 11: Terror and Boredom. Martin Amis's political books have typically been the least well received of his oeuvre. His 1987 collection of stories & Monsters' felt too contrived and naively over heavy on the big ideas (nuclear weapons) compared to the two satirical masterpieces - Money and London Fields, it was chronologically sandwiched between, and his 2002 Koba the Dread, a book to honour the victims of Stalin, was a bit of a hash of an exercise that strained too hard.

A master not only of fiction but also of fiercely controversial political engagement, Martin Amis here gathers fourteen pieces that constitute an evolving, provocative, and insightful examination of the most momentous event of our time.At the heart of this collection is the long essay “Terror and Boredom,” an unsparing analysis of Islamic fundamentalism and the West's flummoxed response to it, while other pieces address the invasion of Iraq, the realities of Iran, and Tony Blair's lingering departure from Downing Street (and also his trips to Washington and Iraq). Whether lambasted for his refusal to kowtow to Muslim pieties or hailed for his common sense, wide reading, and astute perspective, Amis is indisputably a great pleasure to read—informed, elegant, surprising—and this collection a resounding contemplation of the relentless, manifold dangers we suddenly find ourselves living with.
Kekinos
Martin Amis writes with great insight and tremendous feeling in this collection of essays and short stories about September 11th, the War on Terror, and the Iraq War.

He's at his best here when discussing the dependent and literal mind the Islamists, as he does brilliantly in his essay discussing the father of Islamism, Sayyid al Qutb - a contemptible figure who is consumed by lust and who has, like Kimbote in Pale Fire, a self knowledge of less than zero. And in his quietly desvastating short story "The Last Days of Muhammad Atta," Amis reimagines Atta as an apostate who sticks with the "Planes Operation" simply because he likes the killing. His work in this collection contrasts the ideas of love and death; the inhuman obsession of Islamism with death, and the human feeling of love that pervades our lives and which may be, as Martin Amis posits, the only thing that remains of us once we're gone. This is a contrast he also described poignantly in talking about the murder of his cousin and the death of his father in his memoir, Experience.

Amis' entire body of work brims with wit and irony. Having read one or two of his novels and his wonderful memoir beforehand will be helpful, as they underscores just how much Amis must understand and loathe what we have been up against since September 11: a literal, unironic death cult and the frequent sullenness of a world in which such a cult is possible.
Jack
Here is Amis one of so many major writers of our time coming to terms with 9/11, in novels, interviews, articles. This is a chronological compilation of his writing on the subject of terrorism and Islamic Extremism. Always perceptive, keen on effect, as well as a writer whose opinion means something to him. We would say "he gives us his word" that this is what he thinks and how he feels (at least at the time when these essays were written). Read him. He is as good as it gets for us.
Zugar
In "The Second Plane, Martin Amis has produced an excellent book. It is a collection of his journalism since the events of 11 September 2001. The collection is coherent, well researched and a compelling read.

Amis has no sympathy for the barbarians of the Islamic world. In many respects, he is close to the views of his colleague, Christopher Hitchens. His perspective, however, is somewhat more European. He endeavours to see a bigger picture while, at the same time, calling a spade a spade. He sees modern Islam for what it is; namely, a pretence for barbarism.

Perhaps the best chapter from the book is his reconstruction of the last days and hours in the life of Muhammad Atta, the pilot of the second plane to hit the twin towers in New York. Here, we see raw fanaticism. Atta was a psychopath, totally loathsome in all respects. Yet, there is little doubt that there are other such individuals who would love to emulate his "achievements". Amis has little time for such people. He sees them for the shallow but dangerous individuals that they are. He also has no time for the religious fundamentalism that they represent.

Yet despite his views on Atta and his horrible clique, Amis has no sympathy for the likes of George W Bush. This is a man that he identifies as being incompetent at best and stupid at worst. However, by some strange means, this backwoods Texan came to be the leader of the free world. Surely, we can do better?

I suspect that the far right in America will not like some of the arguments put by Amis. Too bad! Amis is a breath of fresh air in the modern political discourse. His book is time and money well spent.
Kakashkaliandiia
Amis is an introspective intellectual who's not afraid to tackle the problems of our time. A must-read for everyone who remembers what the pre-911 world was like and why we will never be the same again.
Wafi
Martin Amis, best known for his outstanding fiction, here offers a collection of previously published essays, as well as a couple of short stories, on the topic of September 11, 2001 and its aftermath. The works range (in their original date of publication) from just after the horrible attacks through September 11, 2007. In his forward to this slim collection, Amis admits he was tempted to revise essays which, over time, show their flaws. But bravely, he allows us to see his original work untouched by the corrective pen.

As such, these materials afford Amis' fierciest critics ample opportunity to selectively slice quotations out of context in an attempt to show the writer in deceptively unflattering light (NY Times critic Michiko Kakutani immediately comes to mind). But chuckleheaded critics' opinions notwithstanding, Amis' gift for turning a phrase and cutting to the essence of an idea is without peer. If there is a living writer who matches Amis' vocabulary, stinging humor, poetic nuance and worldly insight I have yet to read him or her.

Take, for example, this excerpt:

"It is by now not too difficult to trace what went wrong, psychologically, in the Iraq War. The fatal turn, the fatal forfeiture of legitimacy, came not with the mistaken but also calculated emphasis on Saddam's weapons of mass destruction: the intelligence agencies of every country on earth, Iraq included, believed that he had them. The fatal turn was the American President's all to palpable submission to the intoxicant of power. His walk, his voice, his idiom, right up to his mortifying appearance in the flight suit on the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln ("Mission Accomplished") - every dash and comma in his body language betrayed the unscrupulous confidence of the power surge."

Bloody brilliant. This excerpt alone makes "The Second Plane" worth the twenty clams.

Still, it is in his short stories that Amis' dark humor and unmatched skill as a fictionalist comes most alive. "In the Palace of the End" genuinely evokes Kafka, and was, in places, as haunting to read as "House of Meetings."
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