» » Fear, Myth and History: The Ranters and the Historians

Fear, Myth and History: The Ranters and the Historians ePub download

by J. C. Davis

  • Author: J. C. Davis
  • ISBN: 0521894190
  • ISBN13: 978-0521894197
  • ePub: 1215 kb | FB2: 1597 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Politics & Government
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (May 9, 2002)
  • Pages: 222
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 964
  • Format: mobi azw txt docx
Fear, Myth and History: The Ranters and the Historians ePub download

Fear, Myth, And History book. Flourishing briefly in the aftermath of the English Revolution (), the Ranters have been seen as the ultimate counter-cultural group or movement of seventeenth-century England.

Fear, Myth, And History book.

Fear, Myth and History: The Ranters and the Historians by . Davis Cambridge, 208 pp, £2. 0, September 1986, ISBN 0 521 26243 7. Professor . Davis has written a book to show that the Ranters did not exist. There was no Ranter sect: no organisation: no acknowledged Ranter leadership.

Recommend this journal.

Davis' 1986 work Fear, Myth and History: The Ranters and the Historians was particularly noted for questioning whether the radical, nonconformists known as the Ranters ever existed per se, being rather a myth.

Published in 2001, Davis' comprehensive study Oliver Cromwell was described as the best analysis we have of Cromwell's religion and its politics by the Journal of Modern History. Davis' 1986 work Fear, Myth and History: The Ranters and the Historians was particularly noted for questioning whether the radical, nonconformists known as the Ranters ever existed per se, being rather a myth. created by conservatives to endorse traditional values by comparison with an unimaginably radical other

Greaves, R. L, (1988).

Greaves, R.

Similar books and articles. Fear, Myth, and History. Myth in History, Philosophy of History as Myth: On the Ambivalence of Hans Blumenberg's Interpretation of Ernst Cassirer's Theory of Myth. The Ranters and the Historians. J. C. D. - 1988 - History and Theory 27 (1):110. Myth, History, and Theory. Peter Heehs - 1994 - History and Theory 33 (1):1-19. The Myth of Historical Evidence. Jeffrey Andrew Barash - 2011 - History and Theory 50 (3):328-340. Reckless Inaccuracies Abounding': André Malraux and the Birth of a Myth Myth, Memory, and History.

Fear, myth, and history. There's no description for this book yet. Published 1986 by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge, New York. Includes bibliographical references and index.

This book address the relationship between utopian and radical thought, particularly in the early modern period, and puts forward alternatives approaches to. .Fear, Myth, and History: The Ranters and the Historians.

This book address the relationship between utopian and radical thought, particularly in the early modern period, and puts forward alternatives approaches to imagined ‘realities’. Alternative Worlds Imagined, 1500-1700 explores the nature and meaning of radicalism in a traditional society; the necessity of fiction both in rejecting and constructing the status quo; and the circumstances in which radical and utopian fictions appear to become imperative. Preface Note List of abbreviations 1. The historians and the Ranters 2. Who were the Ranters?

Flourishing briefly in the aftermath of the English Revolution (1649-1650), the Ranters have been seen as the ultimate counter-cultural group or movement of seventeenth-century England.

Flourishing briefly in the aftermath of the English Revolution (1649-1650), the Ranters have been seen as the ultimate counter-cultural group or movement of seventeenth-century England.

Myth - Myth - Myth and history: Myth and history represent alternative ways of looking at the past.

Flourishing briefly in the aftermath of the English Revolution (1649-1650), the Ranters have been seen as the ultimate counter-cultural group or movement of seventeenth-century England. Their apparent rejection of sin, hell and all moral constraints, authorities and limitations imposed from above has drawn considerable attention to them as illustrative of an irreligious popular culture and the determination of the people to have a revolution of their own making. Acting out a plebeian permissiveness in denial of the Protestant ethic at the moment of its achievement of dominance, they have drawn the attention, in particular, of those seeking to record the history of a popular tradition rejecting the hegemony of bourgeois values. This book calls in question that framework. The author argues that there was no Ranter group or movement: that the Ranters did not exist. Rather, a myth of the Ranters was projected in a press sensation and was sustained by heresiographers and sectarian leaders. The projection of this myth in the early 1650s is explained in terms of fears aroused by a revolutionary crisis and the dilemma of authority within sectarianism. In this sense the work forms a case study in the projection of deviance consequent upon a 'moral panic'. The elements out of which the mythic identity of the Ranter was composed are examined in detail, as is the projection of the myth.
E-Books Related to Fear, Myth and History: The Ranters and the Historians: