» » Boiling Mad: Behind the Lines in Tea Party America

Boiling Mad: Behind the Lines in Tea Party America ePub download

by Kate Zernike

  • Author: Kate Zernike
  • ISBN: 0312610548
  • ISBN13: 978-0312610548
  • ePub: 1267 kb | FB2: 1729 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Politics & Government
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin; First edition (September 27, 2011)
  • Pages: 288
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 470
  • Format: docx lrf txt lit
Boiling Mad: Behind the Lines in Tea Party America ePub download

Kate Zernike’s "Boiling Mad: Inside Tea Party America" epitomizes well journalistic strengths and . If you wonder, "What are they thinking?!" this book will help you peel back the rhetoric to see the human beings behind the signs.

Kate Zernike’s "Boiling Mad: Inside Tea Party America" epitomizes well journalistic strengths and weaknesses. We learn quite a lot about several key organizers at the grass roots level, how they came to focus on this arena, and engage in the political activism engendered in the 2009-2010 time frame. We also learn that the Tea Party is much more than an Astroturf organization ginned up by well-funded organizations.

Boiling Mad is Kate Zernike's eye-opening look inside the Tea Party, introducing us to its cast of unlikely activists and the philosophy and zeal that animate them.

Concise elegantly written. Boiling Mad is Kate Zernike's eye-opening look inside the Tea Party, introducing us to its cast of unlikely activists and the philosophy and zeal that animate them. She shows how the movement emerged from an unusual alliance of young, Internet-savvy conservatives and older people who came to the movement out of fear and frustration.

Boiling Mad is Kate Zernike's eye-opening look inside the Tea Party, introducing us to its cast of unlikely . She takes us behind the scenes as well-connected groups in Washington move to mobilize the grassroots energy, and inside the campaign that best showed the movement's power and its contradictions.

A surprising and revealing look inside the Tea Party movement-where it came from, what it stands for, and what it means for the future of American politicsThey. Boiling Mad. by Kate Zernike. Select Format: Hardcover.

Kate Zernike on 'Boiling Mad: Inside Tea Party America'". Christian Science Monitor. Retrieved December 14, 2016. She is author of the book Boiling Mad: Inside Tea Party America. She is a graduate of the University of Toronto and Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She lives with her family outside New York City.

Author of Boiling Mad: Behind the Lines In Tea Party America Get all the Latest news, Breaking headlines and . National K-12 Education correspondent for the New York Times. Author of Boiling Mad: Behind the Lines In Tea Party America.

Author of Boiling Mad: Behind the Lines In Tea Party America Get all the Latest news, Breaking headlines and Top stories, photos & video in real time.

What lies behind the Tea Party movement? . Inside Tea Party America. 243 pp. Times Books/Henry Holt & Company.

What lies behind the Tea Party movement? Some of it is purely partisan. It has close ties to the Republican Party. Kate Zernike, a national correspondent for The New York Times, has interviewed a number of Tea Partiers in an effort to understand what they believe and what they want. Her book, Boiling Mad: Inside Tea Party America, is an anecdotal description of the movement, supplemented by an April 2010 New York Times/CBS News poll (already a generation away from the fast-moving character of the insurgents).

"Concise [and] elegantly written. . . . A convincing portrait of the movement's most ardent activists."―Los Angeles Times

They burst on the scene at the height of the Great Recession―thousands of angry voters railing against bailouts and big government―and within the year, the Tea Party had changed the terms of debate in Washington. This new populist movement set the agenda for the 2010 midterm elections, propelling a historic shift of power in Congress and capturing the mood of an anxious country. By election day, a remarkable four in ten voters called themselves Tea Party supporters.

Boiling Mad is Kate Zernike's eye-opening look inside the Tea Party, introducing us to its cast of unlikely activists and the philosophy and zeal that animate them. She shows how the movement emerged from an unusual alliance of young, Internet-savvy conservatives and older people who came to the movement out of fear and frustration. She takes us behind the scenes as well-connected groups in Washington move to mobilize the grassroots energy, and inside the campaign that best showed the movement's power and its contradictions. Putting the Tea Party in the context of other conservative revolts, Zernike shows us how the movement reflects important philosophical and cultural strains that have long been a feature of American politics.

JOGETIME
I should no longer be surprised by journalistic accounts. They always have the same strengths—and there are some in this book—and weaknesses which are also present here. Kate Zernike’s "Boiling Mad: Inside Tea Party America" epitomizes well journalistic strengths and weaknesses. First the strengths; it is a well-written account that humanizes the people associated with the Tea Party. We learn quite a lot about several key organizers at the grass roots level, how they came to focus on this arena, and engage in the political activism engendered in the 2009-2010 time frame. We also learn that the Tea Party is much more than an Astroturf organization ginned up by well-funded organizations. Those organizations were present, of course, but they were tapping into a broad discontent with the American culture and seeking to channel it to their agenda, which they succeeded in doing only to a certain extent.

Zernike emphasizes people who had usually not been politically active previously but were distressed by what they saw happening around them. Keli Carender, for example, came out of liberal household in Seattle to become a spark plug in the movement. Zernike also profiles Diana Reimer from a suburb of Philadelphia who had a mortgage under water and had been stretched economically to the point where the middle class lifestyle she expected was at risk. There are many other ordinary Americans mentioned in this book and what we see to the last one is that they are not crazed racists, radicals, or right wing nutcases. They were reacting, and to some extend continue to react to a set of issues that they see crippling them personally and society as a whole. The result was an emotional and almost primal opposition to what they saw as the status quo.

I would add, and this is one of the weaknesses of this work, that the desperation felt by the Tea Party protestors on the American right was also the same desperation felt on the left manifested in the Occupy Wall Street movement. Both groups differed over where to place the blame for the current situation, and offered different remedies for it, but they both tapped into the zeitgeist of anxiety felt by many Americans. Both sides expressed a sense that the game was rigged, that there was no possibility of success for the ordinary citizen, and that the ruling elites was either unwilling or incapable of making any systemic changes to the structure of society. Hence, a revolutionary/populist effort to change from without was in order.

This is a fine book in many ways. I would like greater analysis, more scholarly rigor, and a broader perspective. But this book is what it is, and it is a good start at helping to understand the Tea Party protests.
Ionzar
Terrific and cogent journey through this somewhat puzzling new political landscape. Neither positive nor negative. Great reporting. Gave me lots of things to contemplate. Often scary. But, hey, this is now real
Realistic
Great book to read if you want to become informed on how the tea party movement came about. Great book for Democrats, Republicans, and Independents alike.
Manarius
If you wonder, "What are they thinking?!" this book will help you peel back the rhetoric to see the human beings behind the signs. It's a brief history of the diverse local groups that self-identify as the Tea Party, from their grassroots anger over bank bailouts and health care reform to their sometime alliances with politicians and organizations also seeking a smaller role for government--though these traditional federal foes often oppose many more programs than the typical Tea Partier, who tends to be at or near retirement age and doesn't want Medicare or Social Security eliminated. Tea Party members enjoy a strong sense of mission and community, they embrace some of the vigorous reform methods of Abbie Hoffman and MoveOn, and they revere the Constitution as an almost religious text that is selectively and narrowly interpreted. There is some divide between the libertarian side which wants to focus on strictly economic matters and those who want to include opposition to issues like abortion and gay marriage. This book is particularly interesting right now because it covers the primary campaigns, the how-did-they-win, of some Tea Party endorsed candidates in next Tuesday's election, including Rand Paul and Sharon Angle (who is opposing Senate Majority leader Harry Reid).
Bynelad
Sadly, I have not read this book but I did buy it for a liberal looney co-worker and she said that it is full of crap....This tells me that the book would be a good read for me. Think I will borrow if from her and then give you a better review here.
E-Books Related to Boiling Mad: Behind the Lines in Tea Party America: