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The New Machiavelli: How to Wield Power in the Modern World ePub download

by Jonathan Powell

  • Author: Jonathan Powell
  • ISBN: 0099546094
  • ISBN13: 978-0099546092
  • ePub: 1782 kb | FB2: 1945 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Politics & Government
  • Publisher: Random House UK; Reprint edition (November 28, 2011)
  • Pages: 320
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 138
  • Format: lrf doc mbr txt
The New Machiavelli: How to Wield Power in the Modern World ePub download

Jonathan Powell served as chief of staff to British Prime Minister Tony Blair from his election in 1997 until his . While not quite the "New Machiavelli", this book is a great read and I would highly recommend it to anyone interested in modern British politics.

Jonathan Powell served as chief of staff to British Prime Minister Tony Blair from his election in 1997 until his resignation in 2007. The only senior member of staff to remain at Blair's side throughout his time at the top of British politics, he was described by the Guardian as being "at the heart of all key foreign policy initiatives. One person found this helpful.

The New Machiavelli book.

It gives an insight into the Blair Years from an insider, Blair's Chief of Staff. Well written and structured, it is a book for political.

Электронная книга "The New Machiavelli: How to Wield Power in the Modern World", Jonathan Powell

Электронная книга "The New Machiavelli: How to Wield Power in the Modern World", Jonathan Powell. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The New Machiavelli: How to Wield Power in the Modern World" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The reader of this elegant little work will learn more about the workings of the new Labour court than he will . As the author makes clear from the outset, his purpose is not to feed the cynicism, all too prevalent in the modern world.

The reader of this elegant little work will learn more about the workings of the new Labour court than he will from many weightier volumes, including perhaps that of the Prince himself, Tony Blair. It is much more than a memoir, full of acute observations and advice that will be of interest to any student of power.

In a 21st-century reworking of Niccolò Machiavelli's influential masterpiece, Jonathan Powell argues that the Italian philosopher is misunderstood, and explains how the lessons derived from his experience as an official in 15th-century Florence can still apply today.

Taking the lessons of Machiavelli derived from his experience as an official in fifteenth-century Florence, Powell shows how these lessons can still apply today.

Jonathan Nicholas Powell (born 14 August 1956) is a British diplomat who served as the first Downing Street Chief of Staff . The New Machiavelli: How to Wield Power in the Modern World, The Bodley Head, 2010.

Jonathan Nicholas Powell (born 14 August 1956) is a British diplomat who served as the first Downing Street Chief of Staff, under British prime minister Tony Blair from 1997 to 2007. He was the only senior adviser to last the whole period of Blair's leadership. During this period Powell was also the chief British negotiator on Northern Ireland  . Talking to Terrorists: How to End Armed Conflicts, The Bodley Head, 2014

Illustrating each of Machiavelli’s maxims with a description of events that occurred during Tony Blair's time as prime minister, Blair's former close adviser gives a devastating, frank, and insightful analysis of how power is wielded in the modern world
Pruster
Powell provides an insightful account of his tenure in the Blair government and the lessons he learned from those experiences. While not quite the "New Machiavelli", this book is a great read and I would highly recommend it to anyone interested in modern British politics.
Dukinos
The most "political" thing I've read since the "Yes Minister" scripts and for someone like me who is definitely not a political animal, an easy read. A life in politics comes across as an ongoing, lifelong war with outbreaks of peace.
Nawenadet
Political Veil"Positioning For Power" is a better read! This book lingers on before the power punch is giving.
Androwyn
It was pretty bad. Powell simply gives a history of his tenure with Blair and peppers his story with "Machiavelli said this..." and gives an example. Then he drones on for 10 pages of unsubstantive material.

If you're looking for an updated "The Prince" or something along the lines of "The 48 Laws of Power," don't bother with this book. It's pretty bad.
Dianaghma
Waste of time and money
Mavegelv
One key difference between listening to a book and reading a book is that you can skim read a book, whereas skim listening is a more tricky art. This book is a case in point as, probably unbeknown to the author, he has a habit of using the same phrases over and over again.
A particularly annoying example that must have occured at least 10 times is starting a sentence with "I wrote in my diary that..."

This little niggle out of the way, this is a surprisingly well narrated audio book, and Steven Crossley is a superb choice to fit the charactor of the text. As with all good narrators, you can easily be seduced into thinking that the narrator is what the author would sound like were he reading the book - something of a rare talent.

The content is also compelling. If you, like me, are a politics junkie then this book is a compelling insight into the Blair years. Compared to Blair's memoirs, it is more analytical and less obsessed about the Iraq war. Compared to the Alastair Campbell diaries, it comes over far less bleak and emotional, but more as a well-reasoned assessment of Blair's leadership qualities through the lens of Machiavelli (often with Gordon Brown as a foil example of what not to do).

One other thing that Powell should be credited with is that he uses Machiavelli with skill and wisdom whilst exalting Machiavelli's ideas (rather than his own). So many times have I read imitations of Machiavelli that are like some sort of cynical parody (e.g. Machiavellian Economics). As Powell critiques early in the book, these lesser books are written by authors who write of Machiavelli "whom only 'The Prince' hath read".

So, although the audio book version is slightly spoiled by various annoying and repetitive phrases, the insightful analysis and measured tone of the book fulfil its promise to apply the precepts of Machiavelli to the New Labour government whilst avoiding pretension or fawning over Blair.
It is my fond hope that one day a chief of staff in the United States will replicate Powell's efforts and use a scholarly understanding of Machiavelli to analyse the work of Obama. Still, in the meantime, as this book reveals, we still have the truly timeless lessons of The Prince.
IWAS
Although Machiavelli is thought of as espousing a politics of deviousness and treachery, in Powell's recounting, his writings have direct application to the practical realities of modern politics. Powell, Tony Blair's chief of staff from 1994 to 2007, provides an insider's look of the twists and turns - and there are so many - of governing in England. With all the constant tumult, the pressures exerting themselves from all directions, it's amazing that anything ever gets done. Mr. Powell presents incidents from his bird's eye view of the Prime Minister's office, along with the presentation and discussion of relevant excerpts from both Machiavelli's best known book, The Prince, as well as from the Discourses. Abundant detail is sure to please even the most committed politics junky.
Around Labour's centenary MP Tony Wright published the People's Party, a history in which the people were notable by their absence. Similarly Powell presents a picture of the Blair years in which you would be hard pressed to recognise a democracy in the country. Of course this is presaged by his comparison of Blair with Machiavelli's Prince. It never ceases to amuse me that the chosen role model for so many contemporary British politicians is an idealised leader from medieval Italy. Meanwhile the champions of democracy in Locke and Hobbes, and its critics like Filmer, Rousseau and Mill are ignored in favour of Italian feudalism. It is tempting to suggest that that says everything about British politics , and Blair, and leave it at that.
Those who, like Powell, use the Machiavelli analogy do so in the hope of providing gravitas and depth when it really demonstrates ignorance and self-importance. Whilst I enjoyed the book as a piece of elite gossip and found its pretensions hilarious, as a piece of history it is self-serving and shallow. It plays to the British desire for strong leadership whilst simultaneously demonstrating that Blair was not a leader of strength.
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