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The Politics of Regional Trade in Iraq, Arabia, and the Gulf 1745-1900 ePub download

by Hala Fattah

  • Author: Hala Fattah
  • ISBN: 0791431134
  • ISBN13: 978-0791431139
  • ePub: 1519 kb | FB2: 1601 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Politics & Government
  • Publisher: SUNY Press (June 5, 1997)
  • Pages: 266
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 569
  • Format: lrf rtf docx azw
The Politics of Regional Trade in Iraq, Arabia, and the Gulf 1745-1900 ePub download

The region has been an entrepôt for centuries, its residents reliant on trade brought by the annual monsoon winds for basic daily necessities (Fattah, 1997). Port cities emerged around pearls, dates and slaves-the mainstays of the Gulf economy until the early twentieth century-creating a wealthy class of mobile merchants (Fuccaro, 2009: 33. .

This history of trade in Iraq, Arabia, and the Gulf basin over the course of 150 years establishes the interconnectedness of the Gulf region by charting the regional ties that bound disparate districts together through long-distance trade networks

This history of trade in Iraq, Arabia, and the Gulf basin over the course of 150 years establishes the interconnectedness of the Gulf region by charting the regional ties that bound disparate districts together through long-distance trade networks.

This history of trade in Iraq, Arabia, and the Gulf basin over the course of 150 years establishes the interconnectedness of the Gulf region by charting the regional ties that bound disparate districts together through long-distance trade networks. Hala Fattah redraws the parameters of the history of this area, tracing the social history of the regional market from its beginnings to its last-ditch efforts to stand up to the onslaught of superior firepower, more efficient technology, and the inexorable rise of the world market.

In Politics of Regional Trade, Hala Fattah chronicles well the transnational forces which have shaped the region and the people of Iraq. They describe a region which seems to have significant potential for cultural and social unity.

Fattah's analysis of the actual structure of the larger regional market also is impressive.

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This history of trade in Iraq, Arabia, and the Gulf basin over the course of 150 years establishes the interconnectedness of the Gulf region by charting the regional ties that bound disparate districts together through . Hala F. Specifications. Suny Series, Social & Economic History of the Middle East. State University of New York Press.

Centre for Arab Gulf Studies, University of Exeter, . Published online by Cambridge University Press: 29 January 2009.

Fattah, Hala Mundhir (1997). The Politics of Regional Trade in Iraq, Arabia, and the Gulf, 1745-1900. Bennis, Phyllis; Moushabeck, Michel (1991). Beyond the Storm: A Gulf Crisis Reader. p. 30. ISBN 978-0-7914-3113-9. Retrieved 13 May 2012. 39. ISBN 978-40793-82-8.

The book was translated into English as Kuwait and the Sea: a Brief Social and Economic History by Fahad Ahmad ‘Isa Bishara (London: Arabian Publishing, 2010).

For examples of studies that use Ibn Bishr’s work, see Hala Fattah, The Politics of Regional Trade in Iraq, Arabia and the Gulf, 1750–1900 (Albany, NY: SUNY Press, 1997)Google Scholar. Ahmad Mustafa Abu-Hakima, History of Eastern Arabia, 1750–1800: the Rise and Development of Bahrain, Kuwait and Wahhabi Saudi Arabia (Beirut: Khayats, 1965). 12. Abdul-Aziz al-Reshaid, Tarikh Al-Kuwayt (Beirut: Dar al-Hikma, 1971). The book was translated into English as Kuwait and the Sea: a Brief Social and Economic History by Fahad Ahmad ‘Isa Bishara (London: Arabian Publishing, 2010).

Examines the development of a socioeconomic region in Iraq, Arabia, and the Gulf during a 150-year period, focusing on regional ties through long-distance trade networks.
Saberdragon
A scholarly and detailed study of trade and commerce in Arabia which was derived in large part from the ancient diplomatic reports of the British Residents (diplomats and Consuls) stationed in Baghdad. Of particular interest are the extracts from Major-Gen. William Tweedie and Sir. Henry C. Rawlinson, on the Arabian horse trade with India, which annually amounted to over 2,000 horses. However, the book also contains an abundance of data on all types of commerce
Laizel
In Politics of Regional Trade, Hala Fattah chronicles well the transnational forces which have shaped the region and the people of Iraq. These include: the economics of trade in a number of commodities, both local, regional, and external; trade routes and the emergence of market towns; the powerful politics of ideology, security, the significant Wahhabi religious influence, some pre-Islamic cultural influences, and the resultant social tensions and movements sparked from all. Language and ethnicity had their impacts, as did family and tribal influences - each of which Fattah also addresses. All of these are contextualized by Fattah into a fairly comprehensible explanatory narrative, coherently interweaving these various influences in a better way than has been presented in similar narratives, at least in this reviewer's experience. They describe a region which seems to have significant potential for cultural and social unity.

Fattah posits as a premise to the book that, during 18th and 19th centuries there was "a broad trading region encompassing Iraq, Arabia, and the Gulf."

Dr. Fattah brings an interesting synthesis to bear on the subject of trade in the region under scrutiny. Apparently for the first time in this type of monograph, Fattah integrates British diplomatic sources with contemporary indigenous histories and also deals effectively with highly respected secondary literature from other scholars in the field. Dealing with the influences of local merchants and trade, focusing on the horse and grain trades, as set against the external and internal influences of the Ottoman Empire and the British Empire - Fattah also focuses the lens on the intriguing influences of the Wahhabist political-religious pan-Arabic movement, which is that part of the narrative perhaps most applicable to questions of nascent Iraqi nationalism.

Fattah's thesis is straightforwardly presented:
"This book is ...[an] attempt in the reconceptualization of the socioeconomic history of one corner of the [Indian Ocean] region...during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, regional networks of trade tied tribal markets in Najd to the markets and port of lower Iraq..., which in turn provided most of the foodstuffs and articles of clothing necessary for Kuwait and Arabistan...; this network stretched all the way to western India ...as a result of the interconnection of disparate and far-flung districts from eastern Arabia to India, regional merchants sustained a large economic region with a wide array of local, regional and international goods, and were in turn provided with the funds and markets required to conduct their extensive business on a transnational basis."

Hala Fattah's most powerful contribution is the discussion of regional unifying influences, of trade groups and of the rising social classes of these new merchantmen of the region, whose caravans delivered every staple of existence throughout a region whose floods, droughts and natural environment made such trade necessary for survival. These appear to be basically three. First, there was the resistance to monopolies, causing new classes to emerge as well as creating some significant migrations. Next, there were the Wahhabist influences from Saudi Arabia - who were fully aware of the impact of the socioeconomic background of the first Saudi imara on the material and strategic contours of the region as a whole. Fattah argues that long overland voyages and relationships had a huge impact in terms of their cultural and political unifying effects, as well as by their related religious overtones and undertones.

Of course, of primary interest to the study of national identities in the area of present-day Iraq must be the many insurgencies which sprang from abuses by trade monopolies, local, regional, and international. Also, Fattah's unifying influences, in many cases, seem to have been no more complex or exotic than the simple impulse for survival, which drove both the trade regimes, and the sometimes powerful reactions to them. British influences were a factor, but it seems that the local influences were as inspirational to massive resistance as they. There were many abuses of trade, as chronicled by Fattah, and much suffering (even starvation); but there were also powerful reactions to that abuse, and this must be the focus of the contribution to the study of modern Iraq by use of the Politics of Regional Trade. Clearly, as documented by Fattah, the Ottoman Empire had a significant impact on concepts of social and cultural unity in the region which is now Iraq, as delivered by the many powerful economic influences of that empire through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries - and all in a time before the impact of the combustion engine-driven industrial economies of the modern world with their insatiable appetite for oil.

Works Cited

Fattah, Hala. Politics of Regional Trade in Iraq, Arabia, and the Gulf 1745-1900. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1997.

C.A. Bayly, Imperial Meridian: The British Empire and the World, 1780-1830, (New York: Longman), 1989

K.N. Chaudhuri, Trade and Civilization in the Indian Ocean: An Economic History from the Rise of Islam to 1750, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 1985

Subrahmanyam, Sanjay. "The Portuguese, the port of Basrur and the Rice Trade, 1600-1650" in Subrahmanyam, ed. Merchants, Markets and the Early State in Early Modern India. (Delhi: Oxford University Press), 1990.
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