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Locke in America: The Moral Philosophy of the Founding Era (Modern War Studies) ePub download

by Jerome Huyler

  • Author: Jerome Huyler
  • ISBN: 0700606424
  • ISBN13: 978-0700606429
  • ePub: 1401 kb | FB2: 1477 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Politics & Government
  • Publisher: Univ Pr of Kansas; First Editiion edition (January 1, 1995)
  • Pages: 394
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 260
  • Format: azw lit rtf mobi
Locke in America: The Moral Philosophy of the Founding Era (Modern War Studies) ePub download

Books on John Locke abound, but until now none have captured the real . Huyler is one of the few that is equipped to deal with both and bring this combined expertise to help sort out the contentious issues.

Books on John Locke abound, but until now none have captured the real Locke. By removing the layers of misperception that have clouded the philosopher's portrait for decades. The Spirit of Modern Republicanism: The Moral Vision of the American Founders and the Philosophy of Locke (Exxon Lecture Series). Rather than restrict himself to Locke’s social thought, Huyler shows the benefits of a full analysis of Locke’s whole philosophy.

Despite the book's many strengths, Locke in America suffers greatly from its presentation .

Despite the book's many strengths, Locke in America suffers greatly from its presentation of the "rosy scenario" of the American founding era. Huyler consistently overstates the freedom and religious tolerance of early American society and minimizes the elements of life that were anything but free. Locke in America will not end the debate over the character of the American founding era, but it makes a worthy addition to the conversation.

Locke in America book. Huyler’s book is distinguished by the excellence of its critical encounter with Locke scholarship. Indeed, the analysis of this scholarship is generally ingenious, and often brilliant.

Conciencia moral y libertad de conciencia en Locke. Manfred Svensson - 2011 - Ideas Y Valores 60 (146):141-164. Locke on Human Understanding: Selected Essays. John Locke and the Way of Ideas an Examination and Evaluation of the Epistemological Doctrines of John Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding, in its Relation to the Seventeenth-Century Criticisms and Defences, with Special Attention to the Impact of These Epistemological Doctrines Upon the Moral and Religious Traditions of His Day.

This study focuses on the inconsistencies in Locke’s political thought and writings related to equality and inequality.

Locke in America: The Moral Philosophy of the Founding Era (Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 1995), 1-28. 102 Richardson – John Locke and the Myth of Race in America. This study focuses on the inconsistencies in Locke’s political thought and writings related to equality and inequality. 5 The discussion begins with the impact of the Lockean tradition in relationship to the origin of Locke’s ideas in his personal circumstances. As such, the analysis examines the intersection of liberalism with illiberalism, democracy, and concepts of race and racism.

Huyler contends that authors as accomplished as .

book by Jerome Huyler. Huyler contends that authors as accomplished as .

Locke in America: The Moral Philosophy of the Founding Era. By Jerome Huyler. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1995. University of Cincinnati. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 02 September 2013.

Quoted in Jerome Huyler, LOCKE IN AMERICA: The Moral Philosophy of the Founding Era (p. 303) There's Hope America. 303).

Locke in America: The Moral Philosophy of the Founding Er. Banks and Politics in America from the Revolution to the Civil War. Article. Am hist rev. Jack Fruchtman. The author argues that previous writers have misread Locke's influence on the Founders: he portrays the philosopher as a moderate 17th-century moralist advocating an individualism that fits well with classic republicanism.

An account of the link between Locke's thought and the American Founding. The author argues that previous writers have misread Locke's influence on the Founders: he portrays the philosopher as a moderate 17th-century moralist advocating an individualism that fits well with classic republicanism.
Exellent
Huyler gets to the essence of colonial political thought leading up to and supporting the American revolution. If you’ve read the recent literature on the intellectual history during our republic’s founding, you’ll know this is not an easy task. Over the last 50 years there have been several schools of thought each with its own skew and emphasis. Wading through the literature can be daunting, without a solid basis in philosophy and history. Huyler is one of the few that is equipped to deal with both and bring this combined expertise to help sort out the contentious issues.

The first half of the book reviews and explains Locke. Rather than restrict himself to Locke’s social thought, Huyler shows the benefits of a full analysis of Locke’s whole philosophy. He sorts out Locke’s distinctive Aristotlean, Enlightenment, Calvinist, and Whig influences to explain Locke’s synthesis. Locke’s virtues of rationality and industry explain Locke’s social-political thought. Huyler clarifies some of the misconceptions about Locke’s thought when seen through 20th century conceptual lenses.

The second half of the book reviews American 18th century thought and how Lockean liberalism was at its core. He shows “Cato’s Letters” are thoroughly Lockean in character and not, as some have led us to believe, a disparate “republican” influence. He reviews 30-50 years of academic confusion, detours, and debates that sought to limit Locke’s ideas. He demonstrates the continuity of ethical thinking and the high regard that Locke was held by our founders.

As a bonus, he contrasts the Lockean influence with the utilitarian approach. While the formal founding of Utilitarianism is after the nation’s founding, the utilitarian impulse, to push aside “rights” for the sake of “privilege” to further the “collective good,” was a constant threat. He applies his analysis of this divergent political thought to the Federalist vs. anti-Federalist split and the limitations that kept the founders from fully implementing Lockean ideals.

My only regret it that I didn’t come across this book sooner. I started to untangle some of the confusion in the literature but realized the task is a full time job. Everything that I figured out had already been discovered by Huyler. Hopefully, this review will save others time, and aid their understanding of the extensive literature on the subject. Good reading!
Stick
This book demonstrates quite convincingly that America was founded on Lockean liberalism which championed individual rights. Our rights, according to Locke, are derived from our Creator and not from society but are simply given formal and legal recognition there. We enter into society - i.e., we form a government - solely to preserve those rights. The "public good" exists, not to triumph over private interests, but to protect and preserve those rights, which are: life, liberty and property. A government that is limited in this way, that does not cater to special interests, allows for true equality so that we may all pursue our dreams. Unfortunately, as this book goes to show, this Lockean philosophy "failed" almost the second that the Republic was founded; though, as Congressman Sam Pettengill pointed out, it failed because, "we have never permitted it to work."

I strongly recommend this book for anyone who is interested in the philosophy that influenced our Founding Fathers. It does an excellent job in explaining the "contradictions" between "public liberty" vs "private liberty". It is well-written, well-sourced and is a hard book to put down.
Uyehuguita
The author does an excellent job in demonstrating the influence of John Locke on the great thinkers who founded America. Backed by an enormous amount of scholarship, and written clearly, this book removes any doubt about the roots of classical American liberalism. The ideas on which "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness" are based were derived from the writing of Locke (and others). And ideas move men to action. The Founding Fathers were true believers, and not (as the leftist movement in academia would have us think) merely attempting to justify the economic supremacy of the wealthy class over the masses. Their beliefs stemmed from a long British tradition of freedom in which Locke played a major role. The author argues his case with cool and meticulous logic. "Locke in America" makes a major contribution and is a pleasure to read.
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