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Real Parents, Real Children: Parenting the Adopted Child ePub download

by Lisa M. Bartels-Rabb,Holly Van Gulden

  • Author: Lisa M. Bartels-Rabb,Holly Van Gulden
  • ISBN: 0824515145
  • ISBN13: 978-0824515140
  • ePub: 1831 kb | FB2: 1780 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Politics & Government
  • Publisher: The Crossroad Publishing Company; Revised ed. edition (September 1, 1995)
  • Pages: 288
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 326
  • Format: mobi azw doc lrf
Real Parents, Real Children: Parenting the Adopted Child ePub download

Real Parents, Real Children goes beyond the question of when to tell children they are adopted with practical advice for parents .

Real Parents, Real Children goes beyond the question of when to tell children they are adopted with practical advice for parents on how to talk with their children about adoption. Throughout, the special concerns and challenges of interracial, international, and older-child adoptions are also addressed. Real Parents, Real Children. offers confidence and assurance as well as sought-after answers to lifelong questions. This practical, informative book: Real Parents, Real Children: Parenting the Adopted Child by Holly Van Gulden and Lisa M. Bartels-Rabb covers many topics of vital importance to adoptive parents with sensitivity and insight.

As an adopted child I was able to understand the feelings I have been feeling all my life. it opened up communication with me and my parents.

book by Lisa M. Bartels-Rabb. Required reading for adoptive families, those considering adoption, or professionals in the field. This practical, informative book covers topics of vital importance to adoptive parents with sensitivity and insight. As an adopted child I was able to understand the feelings I have been feeling all my life. I would truly recommend this book to all people.

Real Parents, Real Children book. This is an informative book for adoptive parents (adopting ANY age of child, or fostering) and professionals who work with families. It is very thorough, although at times a bit dated.

Real Parents, Real Children goes beyond the question of when to tell children they are adopted with practical advice for parents on how to talk . Additional Product Features. Holly Van Gulden, Lisa Bartels-Rabb. Place of Publication. See all 3 brand new listings.

van Gulden, Holly; Bartels-Rabb, Lisa M. Parenting an adopted child is, for the most part, the same as parenting any other child, but is different in some unique and critical ways related to the child's separation from birth parents and genetic roots. Understanding how a child interprets, understands, and feels about adoption, and why, can help the parent guide the adopted child struggling with issues of his or her adoption.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Real Parents, Real Children: Parenting the . Read full description. See details and exclusions.

This practical, informative book covers topics of vital importance to adoptive parents with sensitivity and insight.

Real Parents, Real Children: Parenting the Adopted Child. Holly van Gulden, Lisa M. Resolving conflicts between HMO systems and group practices. Lisa M. Innovative CEO gives Group Health an edge in tough Twin Cities.

Real Parents, Real Children: Parenting the Adopted Child by y Holly Van Gulden and Lisa M. Three Little Words: A Memoir by Ashley Rhodes-Courter. Instant Mom by Nia Vardalos. Older Parent Adoption. Hot Flashes, Warm Bodies by Nancy London, MSW. Adoption Nation: How the Adoption Revolution is Changing Our Families-and America by Adam Pertman. Single Parent Adoption.

Real Parents, Real Children: Parenting the Adopted Child: Holly Van Gulden, Lisa M. I wanted to take this opportunity to highlight how social workers are helping children to remain a part of or find safe and loving families.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. One of our former Foster Youth Interns, Christina Miranda, recently spoke at ou. elly Muratorri.

Real Parents, Real Children: Parenting the Adopted Child by Holly van Gulden and Lisa M. This is a great resource. It provides an overview of many of issues surrounding adoptive parenting such as attachment, contact with biological family and adopting older children. A fantastic resource!

Required reading for adoptive families, those considering adoption, or professionals in the field. This practical, informative book covers topics of vital importance to adoptive parents with sensitivity and insight. The authors bring years of experience to the complex emotional issues that parents will negotiate, and expert advice on establishing a healthy, loving parent-child relationship.
Mr.Champions
Great book Love the author as she is one of my mentors who has made a difference in many lives. I trust her with my child's life.
Phain
We're considering adopting so purchased this. So far some of the chapters have been applicable to us as individuals not just potential adoptive parents, such as the section about how as you grow and your brain develops you reprocess experiences and trauma. Wish there was an updated version but this is still useful.
Worla
Not only is this a fantastic resource for adoptive parents, but an incredible review of normal childhood development and the grieving process. The authors address all scenerios for adoption (foreign, domestic, cross-cultural, from infancy and beyond, from foster care, etc.) in a clear and informative way. The research into this book must have been phenomenal. Recommended reading for parents well into the process as well as prospective parents. It's both honest and hopeful. Bravo!
Rocky Basilisk
I recommend this book to ANYONE who is looking into adoption. This book gives great information what what it truly is like to adopt. Happy reading!
Hi_Jacker
A good book to read for those who are thinking about of have already adopted a child.
Cia
Required reading for adoptive families, those considering adoption or professionals in the field. This practical, informative book: Real Parents, Real Children: Parenting the Adopted Child by Holly Van Gulden and Lisa M. Bartels-Rabb covers many topics of vital importance to adoptive parents with sensitivity and insight. The authors bring years of experience to the complex emotional issues that parents will negotiate, and expert advice on establishing a healthy, loving parent-child relationship.

I do not recommend this book, only read this one if it is a requirement from your adoption agency.

This book was on a list of books our agency recommended reading. By the time I got to it I had read many adoption books. This seemed to be repeating what all the other ones had said and the writing didn’t keep my attention as the others did. I really struggled getting through this book. It does have good basic information on adoption or how to parent the adopted child. While I was reading this I was constantly checking my phone hoping for a message from our birth mother as she was having contractions, I have been struggling with this part of the process. The waiting and then I read this page:

“A pregnant woman can do many things to help ensure everything goes well with the pregnancy, including taking care of her health through diet, rest, exercise, and regular doctor visits. Both she and her partner can experience the reality and inevitability of the baby-to-be every time it kicks, makes her nauseous, or causes her body to change. Expectant adoptive parents, however, often feel at the will of agencies, courts, governments, and birth parents, not only for information and reassurances that all is moving along well, but also for ultimate “permission” to have a child…”

It goes on to share other feelings I am going through as an adoptive parent. It encouraged me a lot to know I am not the only one that feels this way. It is much harder to wait when you can’t feel the baby and you at the will of other people’s decisions.

I rate this book a 3 out of 4 stars.
Delirium
Gulden and Bartels-Rabb cover a large number of issues that adoptive parents would greatly benefit knowing about, even if some don't apply to their personal situation, such as adoption of an older child and the consequent issue of bonding and attachment and re-naming the child. Also, the book offers a great bibliography. I could identify with several points brought up. Preplacement and postplacement stress (and joy!) is one issue I can still vividly remember. Also the fact that parenting adopted children is, in fact, different from parenting birth children. In our case, I found this to be especially true during the first year of our daughter's life when nature had not prepared me for the arrival of a child. Our daughter was four days old and loved around the clock. However, I found that the difference between her and our two birth children lasted only as long as the milk flowed. After that, I saw three unique individuals, and as the years went by, the issue of adoption was no more a household word than the issue of biological birth. We spoke lovingly of her birthmother and brought her up at special events, yet our daughter, very easy-going in temperament, never seemed to suffer an identity crisis or later, an interest in searching. When her birthmother appeared 29 years later, she began a cordial relationship with her but claims that the reunion has not made her whole while before she was fragmented. She had merely made a new friend. Perhaps our daughter was like the little eleven-year old boy quoted by Gulden and Bartels-Rabb: "You know all those things you've been saying about my birth parents? Well, I've come to the conclusion that those poor suckers lost a good thing." It would be nice if all adopted kids felt as confident, but that's sadly not true.
Gisela Gasper Fitzgerald, author of ADOPTION: An Open, Semi-Open or Closed Practice?
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