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Viewfinders: Black women photographers ePub download

by Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe

  • Author: Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe
  • ISBN: 0396086098
  • ISBN13: 978-0396086093
  • ePub: 1428 kb | FB2: 1835 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Photography & Video
  • Publisher: Dodd, Mead; 1st edition (1986)
  • Pages: 201
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 927
  • Format: rtf lit azw doc
Viewfinders: Black women photographers ePub download

Viewfinders: Black Women Photographers Paperback – October 1, 1993. As Moutoussamy-Ashe tells the story, these black women photographers have been there all along, apprenticing under the black men photographers, married to them or their daughters.

Viewfinders: Black Women Photographers Paperback – October 1, 1993. by Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe (Author). As the men were elevated to a partial visibility (after HARLEM ON MY MIND at the Metropolitan in late 60s), the women never rose to attention with them. Like everything else black people ever did that was worthwhile, photography became identified with being a man.

Viewfinders : Black women photographers. Viewfinders : Black women photographers. by. Moutoussamy-Ashe, Jeanne, 1951-. African American photographers, Women photographers. New York : Dodd, Mead.

Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe is a blessing, taking the time. I had been looking for a book that documented Black Women Photographers. The meet my expectations plus some

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Viewfinders: Black Women Photographers as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Read by Jeanne Moutaussamy-Ashe.

by Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe. Publisher's Description. Viewfinders offers an important selection of images that reflect the history of a people and the achievements of black women photographers in America. With growing interest in the contributions of black women to America's heritage, this informative work fills a void in the history of this strong yet little-known group by documenting their contributions through a period of more than one hundred years.

In 1985, Arthur Ashe’s widow, the photographer Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe, published a historical survey that she called Viewfinders: Black Women Photographers. Viewfinders chronicled the work of the (largely disregarded) black female photographers that Moutoussamy-Ashe had meticulously unearthed, dating back to 1866.

In 1986, photographer Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe challenged this narrative with the publication of Viewfinders: Black Women Photographers-a collection of images and biographies spanning the mid-1800s to the 1980s. Though singular, the volume ensured their accomplishments would not be lost to time. Three decades later, inspired by the work of pioneers like Dr. Deborah Willis and Moutoussamy-Ashe, Laylah Amatullah Barrayn and Delphine Fawundu sought to create a new historical document that spotlighted a younger generation of black women photographers.

Photographer ~ Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe. What others are saying. July Arthur Ashe becomes the black man inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame

Photographer ~ Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe. Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe talks about her wonderful husband and the legacy he left behind thru the Arthur Ashe Foundation. Viewfinders: Black women photographers: Moutoussamy-Ashe, Jeanne. Photographer ~ Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe. July Arthur Ashe becomes the black man inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame. He said he felt vindicated after his many years of struggling to get ahead in the predominantly. Three time a tennis a grand slam winner Arthur Ashe (.

As a young photographer growing up in Brownsville, Brooklyn, Laylah Amatullah Barrayn was deeply influenced by Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe’s book Viewfinders: Black Women Photographers

As a young photographer growing up in Brownsville, Brooklyn, Laylah Amatullah Barrayn was deeply influenced by Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe’s book Viewfinders: Black Women Photographers. I’ve always been waiting for an update, Ms. Barrayn said. Had she left it to others, she’d still be keeping vigil.

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Unnis
Anyone who thinks about it knows that the African-American community has ALWAYS had its own photographers. Not as many took up this, essentially, middle-class occupation as they did mortuary science, but there must be hundreds of unknown black photographers who documented the American experiences of the communities in which they lived and work. At one time there were *hundreds* of black newspapers, magazines and pictorial guidebooks, advertising needed them as well, and someone had to provide black movie makers with stills!

Photography was a profession women could access, was non-threatening to the majority, and provided a wonderful communitarian service. Add to that the commercial photographers, the military photographers and this book serves as a gateway to a world of image-making largely untold. A fantastic guide to these accomplished women and the conditions under which they made their images. Modern photographers would do well to known who they were!
Voodoosida
Its a great book for the coffee table. I was expecting more photos inside though. Now they tell me I need more words to complete this review. So basically I was expecting a photo/history in photos.
Ndlaitha
Great Read! The historical treasure of Black Women Photographers found in this book.
Ariurin
Great book. Black history on Black females with solid careers in photography starting from the 1800! These women weren't using point & shot cameras!
Zacki
Reflections in Black: A History of Black Photographers 1840 to the Present

This difficult to find book was a classic from the moment it first appeared, which I remember-- although I had no idea when it first came out how difficult it was going to be to subsequently put my hands on it again. It is a classic history of the black female participants in the field of photography, mostly journalistic or portrait photography (which I frankly prefer for the unsung aspects of history it drags with it).

As Moutoussamy-Ashe tells the story, these black women photographers have been there all along, apprenticing under the black men photographers, married to them or their daughters. As the men were elevated to a partial visibility (after HARLEM ON MY MIND at the Metropolitan in late 60s), the women never rose to attention with them. Like everything else black people ever did that was worthwhile, photography became identified with being a man.

Despite this mindless attempt to separate black men and women in yet another way, black photographers of whatever gender remain marginalized and underrated. Not quite sure why this is but it can be clearly perceived in looking at the present status of the two most famous African American male photographers ever-- Gordon Parks and James VanDerZee. That they are both dead after long rich lives doesn't help. Why doesn't everybody who graduates from college, black or white, know these two photographers, just as they know who Martin Luther King and Malcolm X are?

I think this may not be just the fault of the white corporatization and establishment control of communication resources but also because of the tendency black book audiences have to be oddly stingy when it comes to buying serious books of any kind, most particularly books including visual images and any sort of thoughtful commentary. And needless to say, no other category of reader can be guilt tripped at all concerning these works. Even if you can guilt trip other groups into buying our photography, the effectiveness of it comes and goes Only the people whose legacy is represented can be counted upon to stick with it. I witness this stinginess on a daily basis in my own household and all around me in Englewood, where there isn't a single bookstore worthy of the name and in upper Harlem where I work.

My suspicion is that a lot of us buy books to look at and display, which we don't bother to read so that information contained therein does no good, doesn't lead to anything. People don't know anything more than when they bought the book, maybe less because now they think they've done all they can do for the good health of the black image. It's not the buying of the book that transforms. It's the reading of the book! Of course, there isn't any time these days for reading so who is to blame?xz

Maybe you don't dig my analysis. Nevermind. Just get this book if you can find it-- it should be in the library somewhere or weed through the second hand market-- and it will straighten you out along with Deborah Willis's history of photography with link herein.
Rrinel
What a gem this book is! This is certainly an area of photography unexplored by most. Though I've loved photography for decades, until I found this book I hadn't given much thought to women of color who photographed. When I think of difficulty that women such as Gilpin and Cunningham had in simply supporting themselves in the early days, how must it have been for these women, seemingly doubly handicapped!
One must respect the difficulty Mrs. Ashe encountered trying to uncover so many of the more obscure figures. My favorites were the women who operated commercial photographic studios, taking all types of 'hack' photography. Of course, we have now come to respect that type of photography as a form of documentary work, and some of these women did it beautifully. 'Tex', the military photographer, was another favorite.
Regardless of who you may find as a favorite of yours, as a work en toto this is a superb addition to any fan of photography.
Gtonydne
I am so glad I came across this book. I was not disappointed. Very easy to read and very well written. Excellent book to add to your book collection.
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